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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A method for specifying complex real-time systems with application to an experimental variable stability helicopter

Bradley, Roy January 1992 (has links)
No description available.
2

On-line identification investigation

Ture, M. January 1992 (has links)
No description available.
3

Evolutionary design of robust flight control for a hypersonic aircraft

Austin, K. J. Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
4

Evolutionary design of robust flight control for a hypersonic aircraft

Austin, K. J. Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
5

Evolutionary design of robust flight control for a hypersonic aircraft

Austin, K. J. Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
6

Evolutionary design of robust flight control for a hypersonic aircraft

Austin, K. J. Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
7

Evolutionary design of robust flight control for a hypersonic aircraft

Austin, K. J. Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
8

The application of multivariable control methods to gust load alleviation analysis

Miftach, Fetri Emirudin Hartawan January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
9

Flying qualities of transport aircraft : precognitive or compensatory?

Field, Edmund J. January 1995 (has links)
The introduction of fly-by-wire electronic flight control systems into transport aircraft has given the flying qualities engineer the opportunity to optimise the flying qualities of these aircraft for their specific tasks. With this technology has come the opportunity to introduce new technologies into the cockpit, such as non-linked or backfed sidesticks and non-backfed throttle levers. A comparative survey of airline pilots flying such a very high technology unconventional aircraft and a high technology but conventional aircraft suggests that these technologies may reduce the available channels of communication to the pilot in the very high technology aircraft, resulting in the possibility of reduced situational awareness. A closed loop piloted simulation survey of ten transport aircraft in current operation was undertaken which demonstrated that they all suffered from flying qualities deficiencies, limiting the performance that the pilot could achieve. In particular poor dynamics precluded the pilot adopting tight closed loop, or compensatory, control. Instead it was necessary to adopt a more open loop, precognitive, technique with medium frequency modulation, resulting in a degradation in landing performance. Through appropriate flight control system design it should be possible to produce aircraft that can be flown using the full range of control inputs from open to closed loop. The major study of this thesis assessed, through piloted simulation evaluations, the suitability of a wide range of longitudinal commanded response types for the approach and landing tasks. It was concluded that a response type that closely resembles that of angle of attack is optimum for these tasks due to its conventional characteristics of speed stability on the approach and monotonic stick forces in the flare. Such a system, appropriately implemented, should allow the transport aircraft pilot the full range of piloted control inputs, from open loop, precognitive, to closed loop, compensatory, resulting in improved landing performance.
10

The design of a hingeline electro-mechanical actuator

Kendrick, Kevin Stuart 18 August 2015 (has links)
Aircraft control mechanisms, such as those that operate the flaps, ailerons, rudders, etc., are almost exclusively driven by hydraulic-based systems. Their popularity in flight control systems is not unfounded; hydraulic actuators are quite torque-dense and benefit from decades of development bringing operating performance to a high level. On the other hand the infrastructure to support this system increases weight, adds system development complexity, and reduces aircraft maintainability [Jensen et al, 2000]. Based on recent Electro-Mechanical Actuator (EMA) development and design efforts at the Robotics Research Group (RRG), a new opportunity exists to replace current hydraulic flight control systems with those powered by electricity through a national program [Tesar, 2005]. A literature review of the topic found a 30 year old effort by AiResearch to develop a similarly powered hingeline actuator with given traditional performance goals (torque capacity, redundancy, output speed, reliability). In this report,a thorough analysis is performed on each major component group to quantitatively evaluate this baseline device. Using component technologies developed at RRG, this report proposes a dual torque-summing electromechanical actuator, each with a star compound / hypocyclic combined gear train, designed to exceed the performance of the original (1976) AiResearch project. This preliminary design exercise includes a layout of the entire actuator along with an appropriate analysis of major components including bearings, gear train, motor, housing, and release mechanism. The performance of this gear train is critical to overall actuator success and fundamental analytics have already been developed in this area [Park and Tesar, 2005]. Finite Element Analysis on the gear train and housing provide early design feedback and verification of actuator performance characteristics. In particular, simulation results show the gear stiffness, load sharing, and torque capacities exceed analytical estimates. Finally, four different comparisons are presented that evaluate configuration variations of the two designs based on applicable performance criteria. Results show the RRG fault-tolerant actuator has a marked improvement over the baseline in average stiffness (14.2x), reflected inertia (3.2x) and nominal torque density (3.4x). The chapter next lists actuator test methods and aircraft qualification standards. Finally, a summary of future work is detailed in a ten step outline to bring this EMA technology to a level of early deployment in a large range of aircraft systems.

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