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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Bubble-particle capture in turbulent flotation systems

Pyke, Brendan January 2004 (has links)
Mineral flotation is an important industrial process that involves the collection of particles with bubbles. The bubble-particle collection process involves collision, followed by attachment and the establishment of a stable bubble-particle aggregate. In this fundamental study, flotation experiments involving different minerals have been conducted in a Smith and Partridge flotation column and Rushton turbine flotation cell to determine the effect of particle hydrophobicity, size and density, gas flow rate and turbulence on the mineral flotation rate constant. Measurements of bubble size, bubble velocity and turbulence (e) were also conducted to determine the influence of these physical variables on the flotation rate. / thesis (PhDAppliedScience)--University of South Australia, 2004.
2

A kinetic study of flotation

Cashman, Gerald Thomas, 1947- January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
3

Column flotation froths

Yianatos, Juan B. January 1987 (has links)
A fundamental study on the behaviour of flotation column froths is presented. Three main aspects were considered: hydrodynamic, cleaning (rejection of hydraulically entrained particles) and selectivity (separation between particles of different hydrophobicity). / Column froth hydrodynamics were studied in a two phase (gas-liquid) system. A model to estimate gas holdup from electrical conductivity was developed. Bubble coalescence was evaluated by means of local measurement of gas holdup and bubble size distribution, consequently bubble surface loss along the froth was determined. Mathematical models are developed to describe liquid entrainment and drainage throughout the froth. / The cleaning action was evaluated by monitoring feed water penetration at different levels in the froth, which corresponds to the boundary (worst) condition of fine particles entrainment. Laboratory and plant-scale tracer tests showed that the main cleaning action occurs close to the froth/collection zone interface. / Local grade and solids percentage along column froths, together with a mathematical model describing mass transport, was used to analyse mineral selectivity in column froths. Quantification of mineral loss from the froth, due to detachment and cleaning, is presented. / A generalized model to describe particle settling against a bubble swarm was developed. Entrainment and segregation of particles in the wake of bubbles gives insight into the characteristics of the pulp entering the froth in a flotation column.
4

Fine particle flotation /

Miettinen, Tatu. Unknown Date (has links)
The recovery of fine particles has become of great importance during recent years, since the demand for minerals is increasing and the extent of available ore is decreasing. To recover fine particles by flotation is very difficult due to their low flotation rate, which leads to poor recoveries and long residence times in flotation circuits. In this thesis, the reasons for the low flotation rate of fine particles are studied by focusing on the role of hydrodynamics and surface chemistry in bubble-particle collection. / In this study, fine particle flotation was investigated using 0.5 to 5 mm diameter graphite and quartz as model particles. The graphite particles are naturally hydrophobic whereas the quartz particles are hydrophilic but their surfaces can be modified to various degrees of hydrophobicity. Particle contact angles were determined using the film flotation technique, modified with the addition of a calibration curve of advancing water contact angle and critical surface tension. The film flotation technique was found to be suitable for the determination of the contact angle of these very fine and angular particles, whereas conventional particle contact angle techniques failed. / The flotation behaviour of model particles was investigated using single bubbles and bubble swarms in quiescent conditions in a modified Hallimond tube and at constant gas flow rate in turbulent conditions in a Rushton turbine cell. The results from these experiments showed that to float particles smaller than 5 mm in diameter, an advancing water contact angle of 54° - 3° or higher was needed. This critical contact angle for fine particle flotation is in agreement with the predictions of the Scheludko model, when a correct line tension is used. Importantly, this critical contact angle is independent of the flotation environment within which capture occurs. / The “experimental” bubble-particle attachment efficiencies were obtained by dividing the measured bubble-particle collection efficiencies by the Generalised Sutherland Equation (GSE), assuming that the bubble-particle stability efficiency is equal to unity. A new approach to attachment model was developed using the electrostatic double layer, the van der Waals and the hydrophobic interaction energies. This 1/W attachment model is based on the ratio between the rate of interaction force controlled interparticle collision and the rate of interaction force controlled interparticle collision without electrostatic double layer repulsion. / The 1/W model, the modified Dobby and Finch model and the Yoon and Mao model were compared with the “experimental” attachment efficiencies. The modified Dobby and Finch and 1/W models agreed with experimental findings in this study and others. The Yoon and Mao model shows entirely opposite behaviour. / Bubble-particle collision efficiency increases with increasing particle size. Thus, it is theoretically possible to improve the flotation rate of fine particles by particle aggregation. It was found that the maximum size of aggregates increased with decreasing agitation speed and increasing particle hydrophobicity, electrolyte concentration and condition time. An increase in graphite aggregate size resulted in an increase in graphite flotation recovery and rate in a mixed mineral suspension of graphite and quartz. Selectivity was assured providing that the advancing water contact angle of the quartz particles was below 54°. / A copper sulphate ore was floated in a Rushton turbine cell to validate results obtained using model particles. The flotation experiments showed conventional results for flotation of different size fractions, where the intermediate size fraction floated best. A particle size fraction of -6 mm did not respond to the methods outlined in this study to increase the flotation rate of fine particles, whereas the response of a particle size fraction of -53 +6 mm was as expected. The results indicated that the particle size fraction of -6 mm was highly oxidised and their contact angle was below the critical contact angle needed for flotation, in contrast to the larger particles. / Thesis (PhDEngineering)--University of South Australia, 2007.
5

Bubble-particle capture in turbulent flotation systems /

Pyke, Brendan. Unknown Date (has links)
Mineral flotation is an important industrial process that involves the collection of particles with bubbles. The bubble-particle collection process involves collision, followed by attachment and the establishment of a stable bubble-particle aggregate. In this fundamental study, flotation experiments involving different minerals have been conducted in a Smith and Partridge flotation column and Rushton turbine flotation cell to determine the effect of particle hydrophobicity, size and density, gas flow rate and turbulence on the mineral flotation rate constant. Measurements of bubble size, bubble velocity and turbulence (e) were also conducted to determine the influence of these physical variables on the flotation rate. / Thesis (PhDAppliedScience)--University of South Australia, 2004.
6

Particle-bubble heterocoagulation /

Zongfu, Dai. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (PhD)--University of South Australia, 1998
7

Bubble-particle capture in turbulent flotation systems

Pyke, Brendan January 2004 (has links)
Mineral flotation is an important industrial process that involves the collection of particles with bubbles. The bubble-particle collection process involves collision, followed by attachment and the establishment of a stable bubble-particle aggregate. In this fundamental study, flotation experiments involving different minerals have been conducted in a Smith and Partridge flotation column and Rushton turbine flotation cell to determine the effect of particle hydrophobicity, size and density, gas flow rate and turbulence on the mineral flotation rate constant. Measurements of bubble size, bubble velocity and turbulence (e) were also conducted to determine the influence of these physical variables on the flotation rate. / thesis (PhDAppliedScience)--University of South Australia, 2004.
8

Oils and flotation

Clayton, Charles Yancey, Peterson, Clarence Eugene. January 1916 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (B.S.)--University of Missouri, School of Mines and Metallurgy, 1916. / The entire thesis text is included in file. Typescript. Illustrated by authors. Title from title screen of thesis/dissertation PDF file (viewed April 8, 2009)
9

Contributions to an improved understanding of the flotation process /

O'Connor, Cyril Thomas. January 2005 (has links)
Dissertation (DEng)--University of Stellenbosch, 2005. / Bibliography. Also available via the Internet.
10

Scale-up of column flotation /

Mankosa, Michael James, January 1990 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1990. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references. Also available via the Internet.

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