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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The development of solution algorithms for compressible flows /

Slack, David Christopher, January 1991 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1991. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 130-134). Also available via the Internet.
2

Magnetically assisted liquid-solid fluidization in a gradient magnetic field : theory and application

Sornchamni, Thana 18 March 2004 (has links)
Graduation date: 2004
3

Fluid dynamic means of varying the thrust vector from an axisymmetric nozzle / submitted by Steven Slavko Vidakovic.

Vidakovic, Steven Slavko January 1995 (has links)
Bibliography: leaves 190-212. / xxiii, 240 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / This thesis describes a thrust vectoring nozzle (TVN) which produces a jet which may be deflected at angles in excess of 80o from the nozzle axis by fluid dynamic means, while maintaining total thrust efficiency of the order of 50%, or at 50o with an efficiency of the order of 70%. The thrust vectoring by fluid dynamic means is achieved by injecting secondary fluid at the nozzle throat and partially separating the primary jet causing it to deform. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 1995
4

Topics on spatially high-order accurate methods and preconditioning for the Navier-Stokes equations with finite-rate chemistry /

Godfrey, Andrew Grady, January 1992 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1992. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 209-216). Also available via the Internet.
5

The development of solution algorithms for compressible flows

Slack, David Christopher 28 July 2008 (has links)
This work investigates three main topics. The first of these is the development and comparison of time integration schemes on two-dimensional unstructured meshes. Both explicit and implicit solution algorithms for the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids are presented. Cell-centered and cell-vertex finite volume upwind schemes utilizing Roe’s approximate Riemann solver are developed. For the cell-vertex scheme, a four stage Runge-Kutta time integration with and without implicit residual averaging, a point Jacobi method, a symmetric point Gauss-Seidel method, and two methods utilizing preconditioned sparse matrix solvers are investigated. For the cell-centered scheme, a Runge-Kutta scheme, an implicit tridiagonal relaxation scheme modeled after line Gauss-Seidel, a fully implicit LU decomposition, and a hybrid scheme utilizing both Runge-Kutta and LU methods are presented. A reverse Cuthill-McKee renumbering scheme is employed for the direct solver in order to decrease CPU time by reducing the fill of the Jacobian matrix. Comparisons are made for both first-order and higher-order accurate solutions using several different time integration algorithms. Higher-order accuracy is achieved by using multi-dimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. Results for flow over a transonic circular arc are compared for the various time integration methods. The second topic involves an interactive adaptive remeshing algorithm. The interactive adaptive remeshing algorithm utilizing a frontal grid generator is compared to a single grid calculation. Several device dependent interactive graphics interfaces have been developed along with a device independent DI-3000 interface which can be employed on any computer that has the supporting software including the Cray-2 supercomputers Voyager and Navier. Solutions for two-dimensional, inviscid flow over a transonic circular arc and a Mach 3.0 internal flow with an area change are examined. The final topic examined in this work is the capabilities developed for a structured three-dimensional code called GASP. The capabilities include: generalized chemistry and thermodynamic modeling, space marching, memory management through the use of binary C Input/Output, and algebraic and two-equation eddy viscosity turbulence modeling. Results are given for a Mach 1.7 three-dimensional analytic forebody, a Mach 1.38 axisymmetric nozzle with hydrogen-air combustion, a Mach 14.1 15° ramp, and Mach 0.3 viscous flow over a flat plate. The incorporation of these capabilities and the two-dimensional unstructured time integration schemes into a three-dimensional unstructured solver is also discussed. / Ph. D.
6

Numerical investigation of physical vapor and particulate transport under microgravity conditions

Tebbe, Patrick A. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 1997. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-110). Also available on the Internet.
7

Numerical investigation of physical vapor and particulate transport under microgravity conditions /

Tebbe, Patrick A. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 1997. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-110). Also available on the Internet.
8

Topics on spatially high-order accurate methods and preconditioning for the Navier-Stokes equations with finite-rate chemistry

Godfrey, Andrew Grady 06 June 2008 (has links)
This dissertation discusses two aspects of computational fluid dynamics: high order spatial accuracy and convergence-rate acceleration through system preconditioning. Concerning high-order accuracy, the computational qualities of various spatial methods for the finite-volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. The two-dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and dimensionally split ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy and computational cost. Standard variable extrapolation methods are included for completeness. Inherent steady-state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive-stencil algorithms. Methods for reconstruction error analysis are presented and an exact solution to the heat equation is used as an example. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock-reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the EN 0 scheme to excel in capturing unsteady high-frequency flow physics. Concerning convergence-rate acceleration, characteristic-wave preconditioning is extended to include generalized finite-rate chemistry with non-equilibrium thermodynamics Additionally, the proper preconditioning for the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Eigenvalue stiffness is resolved and convergencerate acceleration is demonstrated over the entire Mach-number range from the incompressible to the hypersonic. Specific benefits are realized at low and transonic flow speeds. The extended preconditioning matrix accounts for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium and its implementation is explained for both explicit and implicit time marching. The effects of high-order spatial accuracy and various flux splittings are investigated. Numerical analysis reveals the possible theoretical improvements from using preconditioning at all Mach numbers. Numerical results confirm the expectations from the analysis. The preconditioning matrix is applied with dual time stepping to obtain arbitrarily high-order accurate temporal solutions within an implicit formulation. Representative test cases include flows with previously troublesome embedded high-condition-number regions. / Ph. D.
9

Generalized spatial discretization techniques for space-marching algorithms

McGrory, William Dandridge 01 February 2006 (has links)
Two unique spatial discretizations employing generalized indexing strategies suitable for use with space-marching algorithms are presented for the numerical solution of the equations of fluid dynamics. Both discretizations attempt to improve geometric flexibility as compared to structured indexing strategies and have been formulated while considering the current and future availability of unstructured grid generation techniques. The first discretization employs a generalized indexing strategy utilizing triangular elements in the two dimensions normal to the streamwise direction, while maintaining structure within the streamwise direction. The second discretization subdivides the domain into a collection of computational blocks. Each block has inflow and outflow boundaries suitable for space marching. A completely generalized indexing strategy utilizing tetrahedra is used within each computational block. The solution to the flow in each block is found independently in a fashion similar to the cross-flow planes of a structured discretization. Numerical algorithms have been developed for the solution of the governing equations on each of the two proposed discretizations. These spatial discretizations are obtained by applying a characteristic-based, upwind, finite volume scheme for the solution of the Euler equations. First-order and higher spatial accuracy is achieved with these implementations. A time dependent, space-marching algorithm is employed, with explicit time integration for convergence of individual computational blocks. Grid generation techniques suitable for the proposed discretizations are discussed. Applications of these discretization techniques include the high speed flow about a 5° cone, an analytic forebody, and a model SR71 aircraft. / Ph. D.

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