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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Der Einfluss von Spleissstellen auf die Rev-abhängige HIV-1-env-Expression

Kammler, Susanne. January 1900 (has links)
Düsseldorf, Universiẗat, Diss., 2004. / Erscheinungsjahr an der Haupttitelstelle: 2003.
2

Die biochemische Analyse der Proteinacetylierung am Beispiel des HIV-1-Tat- Proteins

Dormeyer, Wilma. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Bochum, Universiẗat, Diss., 2004.
3

Der Einfluss unterschiedlicher Leadersequenzen auf die HIV-1-Genexpression

Krummheuer, Jörg. January 2004 (has links)
Düsseldorf, Universiẗat, Diss., 2004.
4

Der Einfluss von Spleissstellen auf die Rev-abhängige HIV-1-env-Expression

Kammler, Susanne. January 1900 (has links)
Düsseldorf, Univ., Diss., 2004. / Erscheinungsjahr an der Haupttitelstelle: 2003. Computerdatei im Fernzugriff.
5

Der Einfluss von Spleissstellen auf die Rev-abhängige HIV-1-env-Expression

Kammler, Susanne. January 1900 (has links)
Düsseldorf, Univ., Diss., 2004. / Erscheinungsjahr an der Haupttitelstelle: 2003. Computerdatei im Fernzugriff.
6

Die biochemische Analyse der Proteinacetylierung am Beispiel des HIV-1-Tat- Proteins /

Dormeyer, Wilma. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Bochum, Univ., Diss., 2004. / Computerdatei im Fernzugriff.
7

Markers of HIV-1 infection and its pathogenesis

Maas, Jacob Jan. January 1900 (has links)
Proefschrift Universiteit van Amsterdam. / Auteursnaam op omslag: Jaap Maas. Met bibliogr., lit. opg. - Met samenvatting in het Nederlands.
8

Barriers, Access, Resources and Knowledge: An Analysis of HIV Testing vis Women's Voices in Ottawa

Vannice, Sarah January 2016 (has links)
Women within African, Caribbean, and Black (ACB) communities are experiencing a higher burden of the HIV epidemic than other groups of women in Canada and a low uptake of HIV testing and counseling. As HIV testing is a well recognized HIV prevention strategy, increasing HIV testing within those most affected by HIV in Canada is a high priority. Therefore, this study gathers and describes the perceptions, experiences, and knowledge of HIV and HIV testing and counseling among women within ACB communities in Ottawa. These perceptions and experiences provide rich context to current barriers to HIV testing and counseling access among these groups of women; context that is utilized to ground recommendations to improve experiences of HIV testing and counseling and to increase the uptake of HIV testing and counseling among ACB women. In essence, this study provides recommendations by ACB women for ACB Women.
9

HIV prevalence and socio-demographic characteristics of patients in a forensic unit at Sterkfotein psychiatric hospital - South Africa

Beke, Masase G January 2015 (has links)
A research report submitted to the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Medicine in the speciality of Psychiatry. Johannesburg, September 2015 / BACKGROUND Human Immunodeficiency virus infection remains a fearsome health condition and South Africa remains the epicentre of the pandemic. The relationship between HIV and psychiatric disorders is clearly established. Patients in mental institutions fit into the definition of key populations due to the higher incidence of the condition in relation to the general population. Whereas the prevalence in the general population has been thoroughly researched over the years, the magnitude and distribution of HIV/AIDS in psychiatric patients is not consistently studied and little is known about the sub-group of forensic patients in South Africa. The aim is to determine the prevalence of HIV and describe the socio-demographic characteristics of inpatients in a forensic unit in a psychiatric hospital in South Africa. OBJECTIVES The objectives of this research study are:  To describe the socio-demographic characteristics of the forensic inpatients.  To describe the psychiatric disorders of forensic inpatients.  To describe the types of crime necessitating admission to the forensic unit.  To ascertain the HIV seroprevalence of forensic inpatients. METHODS A cross-sectional study design was employed. Data was extracted retrospectively from inpatient records on socio-demographic characteristics and health status, including HIV status, using a standardised data collection tool. The study population consisted of all adult patients admitted at Sterkfontein Hospital from 01 January 2007 - 31 December 2011 on forensic grounds, in terms of Section 42 of the Mental Health Act 17 of 2002, with a concomitant psychiatric disorder and undergoing care at the forensic unit. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of the Witwatersrand and the Hospital Research Committee. RESULTS A total of 137 subjects were studied. The study subjects comprised of mainly males (92%), a large number of unmarried people (84.7%) and people who were unemployed (89.8%) at the time of admission. The mean age was 36 years with 75% of the inpatients aged less than 43 years on admission. Two diagnoses accounted for over 80% of the patients with an Axis l diagnoses, namely: schizophrenia (49.1%) and psychosis secondary to GMC (31.2%). Axis II diagnoses were made in 67 patients and the conditions were mainly Mental Retardation (MR) and Anti-social Personality Disorder (ASPD), both accounting for 94.2% of the diagnoses made. Multiple crimes were committed by 21% of study subjects and serious offences included: rape (45.3%); assault with grievous bodily harm (32.9%); theft (19.7%) and murder (19%). These accounted for almost 90% of the crimes that led to admission. Serological test for HIV were done on 124 (90%) of the patients and the HIV seroprevalence proportion was 21.8%. The highest prevalence of 37.5% was found in patients with bipolar mood disorder followed by mood/psychosis secondary to GMC and psychosis NOS at 35.3%. However, there was no statistically significant association between HIV status and Axis l diagnoses. Further analysis also revealed no statistically significant association, at p<0.05, between HIV status and Axis II diagnosis, gender, age, marital status, educational status, employment status, access to disability grants and substance use. However, previous crime was statistically significantly associated with HIV status. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION The seroprevalence of HIV in the Sterkfontein Hospital Forensic Unit is higher than the general population and justifies recognition of forensic psychiatric patients as a key population. With the exception of previous crime, there is no clinical (DSM Axis I and II diagnoses) nor socio-demographic factor associated with HIV status. Furthermore, HIV test was not done for 10% of the patients. Efforts should be made to make an early diagnosis among all patients, and manage the condition appropriately, with treatment offered to all eligible patients. Policies and procedures should be formalised to obtain 100% diagnostic testing of all patients. A comprehensive programme of action should be instituted and maintained to prevent transmission within the institution and break the cycle of transmission within the general society.
10

Correlates of delayed pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis among HIV-infected pulmonary tuberculosis suspects in a rural HIV clinic, South Africa

Boniface, Respicious Lwezimula 11 July 2012 (has links)
M.Sc.(Epidemiology), Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2011 / Title: Correlates of delayed pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis among HIVinfected pulmonary tuberculosis suspects in rural HIV clinic in South Africa Background South Africa is among the countries most heavily affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and tuberculosis. Delay in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) diagnosis is more prevalent in HIV-positive patients and is one of the factors associated with the high prevalence of co-infection in this population. This study sought to determine factors associated with delayed PTB diagnosis among HIV-infected PTB suspects attending an HIV/AIDS clinic in rural South Africa. Methods This was a secondary analysis of the data collected in a retrospective cohort study conducted by Rural Aids and Development Action Research Programme (RADAR). Data were collected using record review of patients assessed as PTB suspects over 2 years from January 2006 to December 2007 at Rixile clinic. TB diagnosis delay was defined as PTB diagnosis after 8 weeks (56 days) from the date of first sputum for acid fast bacilli (AFB) collection, taking into account those diagnosed by culture as it takes up to 8 weeks to culture mycobacterium tuberculosis using Lowenstein Jensen method. Results PTB diagnosis delay was found in 78/162 (48.15%) of the participants with subsequent TB diagnosis. Median delay was 55 days (IQR = 20 – 302). The delay was between 1 to 30 days in 27/78 (34.62%) participants, between 31 to 180 days in 26/78 (33.33%) participants and 25/78 (32.05%) participants remained undiagnosed for more than 180 days. Factors predicting PTB diagnosis delay in multivariate analysis were older age > 40 years (adjusted OR 3.43 95%CI 1.38 – 8.55, p=0.008), high HIV viral-load (adjusted OR 3.13 95%CI 1.13 – 8.71, p=0.03) and being on Antiretroviraltherapy (ART) at the time of PTB diagnosis (adjusted OR 4.19 95%CI 1.66 – 10.58, p=0.002). Conclusion There is a considerable delay from PTB suspicion to diagnosis in these rural HIVinfected patients. Older patients, those with elevated viral load and those who are on ART at the time of PTB diagnosis are at higher risk of PTB diagnosis delay. Therefore active and collaborative efforts to reduce the PTB diagnosis delay are very essential.

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