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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Response shaping in a spherical fast neutron detector

Bhutta, Sakhi M. January 1965 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Michigan, 1965.
2

Evaluation of risks to human health in Hong Kong from consumption of chemically contaminated seafood : a risk assessment approach /

Shaw, Brenda Jo. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references.
3

Soil Contamination Analyses Of Urban Agricultural Sites And Health Risk Assessments Of The Urban Agricultural Community In New Orleans, Louisiana

January 2016 (has links)
Kyle Marshall Moller
4

The use of risk assessment in US environmental protection agency regional operations

Deihl, Susan Margaret 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
5

An analysis of health promoting and risky behaviours of health science students of the University of the Western Cape.

Steyl, Tania. January 2007 (has links)
<p>Assessing and understanding the health needs and abilities of university and college students is vital in creating healthy campus communities. Student learning is a central part of the higher education academic mission, and health promotion serves this mission by supporting students and creating healthy learning environments. Findings from various studies suggest that students entering the university setting put themselves at risk through unhealthy behaviours. Health science students are the future health professionals who will teach health promotion and disease prevention. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse health risk behaviours and health promoting behaviours among health science students at the University of the Western Cape. The study further aimed to identify the factors influencing these students' engagement in these risk behaviours.</p>
6

Prevalence and determinants of adolescent sexual risk behavior

Siperko, Christel Marie Helene. 10 April 2008 (has links)
No description available.
7

The ENCOURAGEing workplaces project: the addition of a fitness based health risk assessment to a physical activity counseling intervention

Hamm, Naomi 13 September 2016 (has links)
There has been a large growth in workplace wellness initiatives; however, use of fitness based health risk assessments (fHRAs) remains largely unexplored. I hypothesized that adding an fHRA to a physical activity counseling intervention (PAC+HRA) would greater increase physical activity levels compared to physical activity counseling alone (PAC). A 4 month, two- group quasi-experimental design was used to test this hypothesis. Over time, there was an increase in total, moderate to vigorous, and moderate physical activity ≥10-minute bouts. Self-Efficacy for Exercise increased and symptoms of depression decreased. Subgroup analysis of the PAC+HRA group found a significant improvement in overall fitness levels. Participants progressed to more advanced stages of change. In conclusion, PAC+HRA did not increase physical activity levels more than PAC. This is likely due to the characteristics of the counseling, fHRA, and outcome measurements. / October 2016
8

Characterization, bioavailability and health risk assessment of mercury in dust impacted by gold mining

Yalala, Bongani Ndhlovu 25 May 2015 (has links)
A Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Science, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 2015. / Gold mining in South Africa has been the backbone of the economy for many years. With it came economic well-being, the growth and development of satellite towns, cities and metropolitan cities, e.g. Johannesburg-a place of gold. Unfortunately, it also came with adverse effects, most of which are now evident, after a century of mining, with little or no regard for pollution prevention or any form of remediation. Of interest, in this study, is the presence of tailings storage facilities (TSFs) found within the residential areas, in close proximity to commercial district and industry, having been built around them. Currently, some 270 TSFs lie dormant, pregnant with vast number of toxic heavy metals from the initially low efficient but selective gold processing techniques. This led to the deposition of the sand dumps, with high sulphur, iron, chromium, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury amongst other toxic metals. Exposure to oxygen, and water, the pyrites were oxidized and formed acid mine drainage (AMD), which resulted in the leaching out all toxic heavy metals into ground water and surface water causing serious water pollution and environmental degradation. Due to the low efficient gold processing technique, some gold amount was discarded together with the tailings materials. The reprocessing of these dumps led to the generation of dust, which is easily distributed over large areas of land. The unrehabilitated, semi-rehabilitated, and the abandoned TSFs contributed to all forms of pollution, majorly, windblown dust from unprotected tops and sides, AMD leaching toxic heavy metals. In this study, mercury, one of the most toxic elements found within the vast TSFs was determined. This was carried out as part of a larger environmental impact assessment on the effects and scale of pollution from the gold mining in the Witwatersrand. The study area consisted of the greater Johannesburg area, covering commercial business district (CBD), the industrial areas (Aeroton, City Deep, Germiston, Selby, Springs), and the residential areas (Alberton, Boksburg, Centurion, Germiston, Greenside, Sandton, Springs). Dust samples were collected from paved surfaces in the streets, and accessible buildings, were sieved into three sieved into three fractions (PM100, PM50, PM25), and most of the work focused on the smallest size fraction (PM25) in order to study impact of inhalable and respirable dust. Three sequential extraction procedures (modified BCR-the European Community Bureau of Reference, selective sequential procedure (SSE), and novel sequential extraction procedure (n-SEP)) were applied for partitioning and evaluating the mobility, availability and persistence of mercury in urban dusts. Bioavailability of mercury was assessed by leaching dust with artificial gastric and lung fluids which mimicked body conditions. Contamination levels were assessed based on the enrichment factor (EF), contamination factor (Cf) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) were calculated to further assess the environmental risk and provide a preliminary estimate of the main sources of mercury in street dust. Non-carcinogenic effects and carcinogenic effects due to exposure to urban street dusts were assessed for both children and adults. The total mercury (HgTOT) ranged from 269 to 1350 μg kg-1. In the PM25 size fraction, mercury exhibited the following decreasing order of HgTOT: industrial area > CBD > residential area. This order shows that the HgTOT concentration in the street dust decreased with increased distance from the TSFs. The highlight was that the highest HgTOT was reported in industrial areas next to the TSFs, tailings reprocessing areas, and tailings footprints. Furthermore, in residential areas grossly affected by TSFs and tailings reprocessing, reported high HgTOT values similar to those reported for industrial samples. These results indicated that the presence of TSFs were largely responsible for the mercury found in the dust. The results from the characterization of the dust showed a large concentration of fine particulate matter, with the characteristically high quartz (74 – 98 wt. %), and minor minerals phases such as chloritoid, chlorite, K-feldspar, jarosite, mica, muscovite, pyrite, and pyrophyllite, all below 10 wt. %. These have been known to enrich trace metals, hence a high concentration of mercury. The close proximity of the tailings to the communities led to the determination of bioavailability of mercury from dust. The bioaccessible Hg extracted by lung fluid (up to 3% of HgTOT) was higher than that of gastric fluid (up to 1% of HgTOT) and was related to the mobile pool of Hg in dust. This suggests that human exposure to Hg in dust via inhalation is greater than that via the gastric tract. These values were very similar to the values obtained from water soluble phase in the sequential extraction procedure (average 1.4% of HgTOT). This indicated that these fluids were able to extract the most bioavailable fraction of Hg, which is responsible for most of the transformation reactions involving mercury. Contamination assessment factor was carried out to classify the pollution levels and indicate whether they are from natural or anthropogenic sources. Based on the EF, Cf, and Igeo, 70, 82, and 84% of the street dust samples were classified as heavily enriched, very highly contaminated, and strongly polluted by mercury, respectively, indicating that they are of anthropogenic origin. The human health risk model was useful in identifying the areas of health risks from exposure to mercury pollution. It showed that children were more vulnerable than adults when exposed to mercury in dust via ingestion. The cancer risk for exposure to As, Cd, and Cr by both children and adults was significantly high for oral ingestion of dust. Cr (VI) was the highest contributor followed by As and lastly Cd. For inhalation pathway, the possibility of developing cancer after a lifetime exposure was low and below the acceptable limits (10-6).
9

An analysis of health promoting and risky behaviours of health science students of the University of the Western Cape.

Steyl, Tania. January 2007 (has links)
<p>Assessing and understanding the health needs and abilities of university and college students is vital in creating healthy campus communities. Student learning is a central part of the higher education academic mission, and health promotion serves this mission by supporting students and creating healthy learning environments. Findings from various studies suggest that students entering the university setting put themselves at risk through unhealthy behaviours. Health science students are the future health professionals who will teach health promotion and disease prevention. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse health risk behaviours and health promoting behaviours among health science students at the University of the Western Cape. The study further aimed to identify the factors influencing these students' engagement in these risk behaviours.</p>
10

Willingness to pay for health risk reductions : the importance of scenario adjustment, household structure and type of disease /

Johnson, Erica H. January 2009 (has links)
Typescript. Includes vita and abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 146-150). Also available online in Scholars' Bank; and in ProQuest, free to University of Oregon users.

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