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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Individuals and societies a methodological inquiry.

Chattopadhyaya, Debiprasad. January 1900 (has links)
Rev. version of the author's PH. D. thesis, University of London, 1963. / Includes bibliographical references.
2

Individuals and societies a methodological inquiry.

Chattopadhyaya, Debiprasad. January 1900 (has links)
Rev. version of the author's PH. D. thesis, University of London, 1963. / Includes bibliographical references.
3

The nature and meaning of historical knowledge.

Fleer, Edward H. January 1939 (has links)
No description available.
4

Professional practice and perspectives in the teaching of historical empathy

Cunningham, Deborah Lynn January 2004 (has links)
To empathise, in a historical sense, generally means to entertain the perspectives and values of people in the past through consideration of the circumstances they faced. Widely acknowledged as a fundamental part of the historian's craft, empathy has had a more tenuous place in school history due to the conceptual confusion of the term, its association with the promotion of a leftist political agenda, and its difficulty for pupils. Scholarship on empathy has focused upon its philosophical meaning and students' thought processes, but has largely neglected to explore teachers' knowledge and practice about how to cultivate it. Instead, it has tended to offer norms for good practice that take little account of differing contexts or the sometimes competing goals that teachers seek to achieve. It has been guided as well by a particular image of empathy teaching as dedicated exercises, often involving immersion in many historical sources. My study begins to address the lack of attention to teachers' actual ideas and practices for fostering empathy by presenting a case study of four experienced history educators in England. Through extensive analysis of lesson and interview transcripts, I derive a new framework for thinking about empathy teaching that takes into account both the major activities and smallscale discourse strategies - heretofore largely unexamined - that the teachers use to promote understanding. It attends to their ways of conceptualising empathy, their means of establishing the conditions they view as essential, their negotiations of myriad factors helping or hindering their efforts, and their complex deployments of various types of relevant knowledge. The framework shows how, in making decisions about empathy teaching, they consider student factors such as capacities, preconceptions and motivation, structural factors such as time, resources, and examination priorities, and factors concerning their own knowledge, beliefs and state - then utilise a broad and flexible repertoire of strategies to address the shifting variables they encounter. Finally, the study explores curriculum as an interaction between teachers, pupils and educational context, recognising the influence of each on understanding in particular classrooms. Significant divergences between how teachers think and practice and how empathy teaching is discussed in the educational literature emerge for a spectrum of issues. These include how empathy is conceptualised, what sorts of strategies are enacted, who the historical subjects of empathetic efforts are, how students' achievements are assessed, and how empathy-related dilemmas are construed and managed. All of these discrepancies suggest that research stands to benefit by attending more closely to teachers' ideas. For their part, the teachers appear to be oriented toward self-improvement - learning and changing through experience, collegial contact, and focused reflection of the sort prompted by this research. Implications for teachers' professional development and for future research approaches are explored.
5

Borders and objects : representing the geopolitical in new world art histories, 1990-2010

Hou, Fang-Lin January 2013 (has links)
Several contemporary art historians have been interested in exploring how their discipline could respond to the increasing globalisation of knowledge and information by encompassing global perspectives into the methodologies that underpin their approaches to art historiography. This dissertation aims to explore how, in developing their new approaches to world art history, they have drawn on a range of natural and social sciences, thus enabling their work to be placed in a wider social, political and indeed global context. While their individual approaches are many and varied it is important to identify commonalities between them so as to highlight unifying approaches across such diversity. The dissertation begins with literature review of the key concepts I want to explore. The work of the 19th century historian, Aby Warburg is highlighted to draw attention to his early pioneering attempts to provide an intercultural perspective to art history. Recent attempts to develop new approaches to world art history are then analysed. These include works by David Carrier, Ben-Ami Scharfstein, David Summers, Esther Pasztory and John Onians. The thesis concludes with a discussion on the recent exhibition at the British Museum entitled A History of the World in 100 Objects. The dissertation will show that despite the diverse methodologies used by all of these writers and the challenges of the different media employed, all utilise concepts of borders and objects in an explicitly geopolitical context.
6

Voltaire's philosophy of history and historical method

Brumfitt, J. H. January 1953 (has links)
No description available.
7

Teaching historical thinking: what happened in a secondary school world history classroom

Chowen, Brent William 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
8

Children learning from children of the past: a study of fifth graders' development of empathy with historical characters

Geneser, Pamela Vivien Loomis 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
9

The idea of a hermeneutic of history.

Posel, Rosalind. January 1982 (has links)
Constantly confronted by history, man has what may be termed a natural impulse to make sense of the past. And indeed, the past cannot be understood without also understanding the present. Thus that fundamental historical impulse is profoundly philosophical in the Socratic sense. It is because hermeneutics explicitly identifies itself with the Socratic tradition, that my attempt to elucidate the nature of written history as an academic discipline has been located within a hermeneutic point of view. In the course of this thesis I refer to several major debates in social theory. However, I make no pretense at covering these debates fully. They are cited insofar as they bear on issues arising in the development of the idea of a hermeneutic of history. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Durban, 1982.
10

An oral history of the April 1, 1946 tsunami at Laupāhoehoe, Hawaiʻi: a case study in the educative value of constructing history from memory and narrative

Nishimoto, Warren S 12 1900 (has links)
The tsunami of April 1, 1946 was the deadliest natural disaster in the history of modern Hawaiʻi. Of the 159 casualties in the islands, twenty-four died at Laupahoehoe, a sugar plantation community on Hawaiʻi island. This study presents and analyzes oral history narratives of five survivors and eyewitnesses. In one-to-one interviews, four students and one teacher of Laupahoehoe School recalled their early life experiences, as well as what they saw and heard that morning in 1946; how and why they reacted to the unfolding drama the way they did; and how the events of that day affected them to the present. The oral histories are examined through two lenses. First, as living historical documents, they reveal a human side of the tragedy, a side often overlooked by researchers pre-occupied with statistical and scientific explanations. Documenting people's life experiences and values, the oral histories provide us with knowledge and understanding of tsunamis from humanistic as well as scientific perspectives. Second, as case studies, the interview narratives reflect oral history's role in an emerging trend in social science research, in which the process of gathering data is almost as closely analyzed as the data itself. This study examines memory, or how and why we recall life experiences; narrative, or how and why we tell stories about what we remember; and history, or how and why we preserve these stories for present and future generations. Oral history involves an interviewee/narrator who, in a conversational, question-and-answer setting with an interviewer/researcher, recalls details of his/her life experiences. The interviews are recorded, processed, preserved, and transmitted in various formats for posterity. This examination of oral history, or the "alchemy" of transmuting memory into history, demonstrates its educative role to all involved in the process: the interviewee/narrator, who has lived through and remembers his/her life experiences; the interviewer/researcher, who collaborates with the interviewee/narrator to construct historical narratives; and present and future generations of scholars, students, and the lay community, who will utilize the narratives as primary accounts about the past. / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2002. / Mode of access: World Wide Web. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 219-231). / Electronic reproduction. / Also available by subscription via World Wide Web / ix, 231 leaves, bound 29 cm

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