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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

A comparison of theory with laboratory and field observations of wave propagation in grease ice /

Newyear, Karl D. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1997. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [121]-127).
42

Messung dielektrischer Eigenschaften polarer Eiskerne = Measuring the dielectric properties of polar ice cores /

Wilhelms, Frank. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Univ., Diss.--Bremen, 2000. / Im Anhang gekürzte Fassung einer Doktorarbeit. Literaturverz. S. 155 - 170. Nebent.: Dielektische Eigenschaften von Eiskernen.
43

Ice nuclei and convective storms.

Isaac, George A. January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
44

A mathematical and experimental study of anchor ice

Qu, Yuexia 13 October 2010 (has links)
The existence of anchor ice in supercooled water can have a profound impact on the management of water resource infrastructures in cold regions. For example, it can raise a tailrace water level and cause significant losses in generation revenue. So far, there have been limited studies on anchor ice, therefore, many problems still exist and much more study is needed. In the present research, experimental and mathematical studies of anchor ice were carried out. Experiments were conducted in a counter-rotating flume, located in a cold room at the University of Manitoba. The experiments were mainly focused on anchor ice evolution around rocks and on gravel beds under different hydro-meteorological conditions. The results are compared to a mathematical model developed herein and some important parameters such as anchor ice porosity and frazil ice deposition coefficient are examined. The growth process of anchor ice was monitored by two CCD cameras. A digital processing program was developed to analyze anchor ice images and determine the growth rate of anchor ice. In addition, anchor ice density, an important factor when studying anchor ice, was estimated and the effect of air temperature, Froude number and Reynolds number is explored. By analyzing torque load signals from the counter-rotating flume, the variation of bed roughness with the growth of anchor ice is elucidated. The deposition coefficient of anchor ice growth was also determined from the experiments. A mathematical model was developed based on a two-stage method to simulate the process of frazil ice transportation and deposition. Both frazil ice attachment and heat transfer between the supercooled water and ice crystals are considered in the model. Four governing equations related to the distribution of velocity and frazil ice transportation and deposition inside and outside the roughness layers were built. A fourth-order Runge- Kutta numerical method was used and programmed in Matlab to solve the governing equations. The growth rate of anchor ice under different hydro-meteorological conditions can be simulated by this numerical model. The proposed experimental and mathematical studies of anchor ice are presented intuitively in this paper and the results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the anchor ice growth mechanism. This study will help to develop better management strategies to mitigate ice related complications associated with hydroelectric generating stations and other hydraulic structures in cold regions.
45

A mathematical and experimental study of anchor ice

Qu, Yuexia 13 October 2010 (has links)
The existence of anchor ice in supercooled water can have a profound impact on the management of water resource infrastructures in cold regions. For example, it can raise a tailrace water level and cause significant losses in generation revenue. So far, there have been limited studies on anchor ice, therefore, many problems still exist and much more study is needed. In the present research, experimental and mathematical studies of anchor ice were carried out. Experiments were conducted in a counter-rotating flume, located in a cold room at the University of Manitoba. The experiments were mainly focused on anchor ice evolution around rocks and on gravel beds under different hydro-meteorological conditions. The results are compared to a mathematical model developed herein and some important parameters such as anchor ice porosity and frazil ice deposition coefficient are examined. The growth process of anchor ice was monitored by two CCD cameras. A digital processing program was developed to analyze anchor ice images and determine the growth rate of anchor ice. In addition, anchor ice density, an important factor when studying anchor ice, was estimated and the effect of air temperature, Froude number and Reynolds number is explored. By analyzing torque load signals from the counter-rotating flume, the variation of bed roughness with the growth of anchor ice is elucidated. The deposition coefficient of anchor ice growth was also determined from the experiments. A mathematical model was developed based on a two-stage method to simulate the process of frazil ice transportation and deposition. Both frazil ice attachment and heat transfer between the supercooled water and ice crystals are considered in the model. Four governing equations related to the distribution of velocity and frazil ice transportation and deposition inside and outside the roughness layers were built. A fourth-order Runge- Kutta numerical method was used and programmed in Matlab to solve the governing equations. The growth rate of anchor ice under different hydro-meteorological conditions can be simulated by this numerical model. The proposed experimental and mathematical studies of anchor ice are presented intuitively in this paper and the results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the anchor ice growth mechanism. This study will help to develop better management strategies to mitigate ice related complications associated with hydroelectric generating stations and other hydraulic structures in cold regions.
46

Radio sounding of Antarctic ice

Jiracek, George R. January 1965 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1965. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 118-122).
47

Ice forces on a faceted cone due to the passage of a level ice field /

Lau, Michael Wai-Hung. January 1999 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.), Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1999. / Restricted until June 2000. Bibliography: p. 306-330.
48

The flow dynamics and buttressing of ice shelves

Wearing, Martin January 2017 (has links)
In this thesis, I explore the flow dynamics associated with ice shelves confined within channels and the buttressing they provide to grounded ice. Ice shelves are the floating extensions of ice sheets and act as the interface between the ice sheet and the ocean. They form when ice flows out from the interior of the ice sheet towards the coast and begins to float as the ice thins. Ice shelves are often found within a channel or pinned in place by stationary bedrock outcrops. The interest in their dynamics is motivated by the buttressing effect they provide to the grounded ice, which strongly controls the rate of ice discharge and thereby the contribution to sea-level rise. I use a combination of mathematical modeling, fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments and geophysical data analysis to develop an improved understanding of ice-shelf flow dynamics. Initially, geophysical data in the form of Antarctic ice-surface velocity data is analysed, producing maps of strain rate, shear rate and strain orientation for Antarctic ice shelves. This allows the geophysical setting and flow processes to be explored, particularly by identifying areas where resistance to ice flow is generated and regions of the shelf that make no contribution to buttressing. Using the geophysical data, I find good agreement between a theoretical scaling relationship for ice flow at the ice-shelf calving front and data from Antarctic ice shelves. I proceed to develop an idealized mathematical model of an ice shelf confined to flow in a channel. By assuming shear-dominated dynamics within the shelf, analytical solutions are obtained for steady-state ice-shelf thickness profiles in parallel and diverging channels. This model is developed further to include both shear and extensional stresses, from which numerical solutions for steady-state shelves are calculated. The results from these two models are then compared. It is found that shear stresses dominate the dynamics throughout the majority of the shelf, with adjustment regions at the upstream and downstream boundaries where extensional dynamics become important. Output from these models is also compared with geophysical data and it is observed that there is good agreement between several features of the thickness profiles and velocity fields. In addition to the geophysical data, comparisons are made with fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a channel. The advantage of performing experiments of this kind is that parameters such as the fluid rheology can be varied, allowing for direct comparison with a range of parameters in the mathematical models. From these experiments, surface velocity fields and thickness profiles are collected, which are used to make comparisons with the models. Clear differences are observed in the velocity and strain-rate fields produced using fluids with different rheologies, for which there is qualitative agreement with the output from the mathematical models.
49

Identifying fast glacier flow : the sedimentological and micromorphological signature of surges and ice streams

Leighton, Iain Douglas Leighton January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
50

Internal stress in a floating cover of sea ice

Wright, B. D. January 1974 (has links)
No description available.

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