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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Sources of anti-immigrant attitudes in Europe

Rustenbach, Elisa. Booth, Alan, January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Pennsylvania State University, 2009. / Mode of access: World Wide Web. Thesis advisor: Alan Booth.
2

New immigrants face mismatch of skills in the Hong Kong labour market /

Au, Wing-yee, Brenda. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M. Journ.)--University of Hong Kong, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 24-27).
3

A Comparison of Earnings of Chinese and Indian Immigrants in Canada: An Analysis of the Effect of Language Ability

Nath, Aaramya 12 October 2011 (has links)
The effect of knowledge of the official languages on the earnings of immigrants in Canada from its two largest source countries: China and India, is examined in this thesis. A visible difference is observed in the earning levels of these two immigrant groups. The difference is especially striking amongst the men of these groups. The role of language is assessed by estimating both annual earnings and weeks worked and by controlling for other variables that would affect the earning levels of individuals. The observed earnings gap between Chinese and Indian immigrants falls slightly when self-assessed language ability is controlled. / N/A
4

Education, earnings, and employment: an investigation of immigrants in Canadian cities

Baker, Shawn 20 January 2011 (has links)
Despite the increasing levels of education possessed by recent immigrants to Canada, the incomes and employment status of newcomers is declining. While there exists a significant body of research that tracks this decline, few focus on immigrants living outside the ‘traditional’ migrant communities of Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver. This thesis uses data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey to investigate earnings and employment chances of immigrants and non-immigrants based upon educational achievement throughout Canada. This study divides Canada into four tiers based on the number of immigrants received in order to assess the economic outcomes of the two groups. Economic outcome is judged through the lens of social capital framework and human capital theory to evaluate the influence of social networks and individual accomplishments. Results of the regressions analyses indicate that those who are Canadian-born have stronger returns to education in all but the 3rd-tier though the differences appear to be relatively minimal. Specifically, among foreign-born migrants, living in the 3rd-tier coincides with better earning returns to education while schooling is only important for employment for those residing in 1st-tier centres. Additionally, the influence of social networks is negligible regardless of nativity status. Despite lesser returns to education, immigrants appear to earn more than their native-born counterparts based upon occupation, though the results for employment suggest that reaching this point may be more difficult than for those Canadian-born. Lastly, there seems to be economic opportunities for immigrants outside of the 1st-tier leading to better monetary outcomes. The findings of this project contribute to current immigration literature in Canada and hold implications for the Canadian immigration policy.
5

Education, earnings, and employment: an investigation of immigrants in Canadian cities

Baker, Shawn 20 January 2011 (has links)
Despite the increasing levels of education possessed by recent immigrants to Canada, the incomes and employment status of newcomers is declining. While there exists a significant body of research that tracks this decline, few focus on immigrants living outside the ‘traditional’ migrant communities of Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver. This thesis uses data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey to investigate earnings and employment chances of immigrants and non-immigrants based upon educational achievement throughout Canada. This study divides Canada into four tiers based on the number of immigrants received in order to assess the economic outcomes of the two groups. Economic outcome is judged through the lens of social capital framework and human capital theory to evaluate the influence of social networks and individual accomplishments. Results of the regressions analyses indicate that those who are Canadian-born have stronger returns to education in all but the 3rd-tier though the differences appear to be relatively minimal. Specifically, among foreign-born migrants, living in the 3rd-tier coincides with better earning returns to education while schooling is only important for employment for those residing in 1st-tier centres. Additionally, the influence of social networks is negligible regardless of nativity status. Despite lesser returns to education, immigrants appear to earn more than their native-born counterparts based upon occupation, though the results for employment suggest that reaching this point may be more difficult than for those Canadian-born. Lastly, there seems to be economic opportunities for immigrants outside of the 1st-tier leading to better monetary outcomes. The findings of this project contribute to current immigration literature in Canada and hold implications for the Canadian immigration policy.
6

Identity formation(s) of mainland immigrants in Hong Kong /

Leung, Yvonne Yee Man. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.Phil.)--Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 156-165). Also available in electronic version.
7

Immigrant integration in Denmark /

Darin, Lisa Ann, January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.) -- Central Connecticut State University, 2008. / Thesis advisor: Richard Benfield. "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Geography." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-89). Also available via the World Wide Web.
8

New immigrants face mismatch of skills in the Hong Kong labour market

Au, Wing-yee, Brenda. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M.Journ.)--University of Hong Kong, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 24-27). Also available in print.
9

Housing tenure choice of immigrants in the United States

Pan, Zhenfeng, January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Louisville, 2005. / School of Urban and Public Affairs. Vita. "May 2005." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-112).
10

Immigration multiplier : a new method of measuring the immigration process /

Yu, Bin. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Brown University, 2005. / Vita. Thesis advisor: Michael J. White. Includes bibliographical references (leaves xii-xxvii). Also available online.

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