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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Individual Investors and Financial Disclosure

Lawrence, Alastair 10 January 2012 (has links)
Using detailed data of individual investors, this dissertation investigates whether and how individuals use financial disclosure and analysts’ signals. Chapter 1 shows that, on average, individuals invest more in firms with readable, concise, and transparent financial disclosures. The results indicate that these relations are less pronounced for overconfident investors, and that individual investors appear to place a greater weighting on such financial disclosure attributes relative to institutional investors. In supplementary analyses, I further examine cross-sectional variations among individuals in their use of disclosure, and find two main subgroups that do not display a preference for accessible and transparent disclosures. The first subgroup is speculative investors, whose investment strategies rely on conjecture rather than knowledge, and the second subgroup is financially literate investors, those with lower information processing costs. These findings support the notion that more accessible and transparent disclosures are used by those individuals who need them the most: i.e., the average American. Lastly, I examine whether individuals’ investment performance varies with financial disclosure attributes and show that individuals’ returns are, on average, increasing in firms with more accessible and transparent disclosures. Chapter 2 examines how individuals react to revisions in analysts’ recommendations and earnings forecasts. First, the analyses show that individuals’ abnormal trading activity increases by 30 percent in response to analysts’ recommendation revisions and by 15 percent in response to analysts’ earnings forecast revisions. Second, the analyses indicate that 47 percent of individuals trade consistently with analyst guidance and 53 percent trade contrarian to analysts’ guidance, which opposes the belief that individuals are a homogenous group of investors. The contrarian behavior is most common in response to analyst downgrades (i.e., purchasing after downgrades) and is most evident among individuals with better prior performance, individuals who trade infrequently, men, and older individuals. Lastly, the study provides evidence suggesting that trading contrarian to analysts is in general hazardous to individuals’ financial health. Taken together, the results indicate that individuals respond to analyst guidance and that individuals’ use of analyst guidance varies significantly with respect to their personal attributes.
2

Individual Investors and Financial Disclosure

Lawrence, Alastair 10 January 2012 (has links)
Using detailed data of individual investors, this dissertation investigates whether and how individuals use financial disclosure and analysts’ signals. Chapter 1 shows that, on average, individuals invest more in firms with readable, concise, and transparent financial disclosures. The results indicate that these relations are less pronounced for overconfident investors, and that individual investors appear to place a greater weighting on such financial disclosure attributes relative to institutional investors. In supplementary analyses, I further examine cross-sectional variations among individuals in their use of disclosure, and find two main subgroups that do not display a preference for accessible and transparent disclosures. The first subgroup is speculative investors, whose investment strategies rely on conjecture rather than knowledge, and the second subgroup is financially literate investors, those with lower information processing costs. These findings support the notion that more accessible and transparent disclosures are used by those individuals who need them the most: i.e., the average American. Lastly, I examine whether individuals’ investment performance varies with financial disclosure attributes and show that individuals’ returns are, on average, increasing in firms with more accessible and transparent disclosures. Chapter 2 examines how individuals react to revisions in analysts’ recommendations and earnings forecasts. First, the analyses show that individuals’ abnormal trading activity increases by 30 percent in response to analysts’ recommendation revisions and by 15 percent in response to analysts’ earnings forecast revisions. Second, the analyses indicate that 47 percent of individuals trade consistently with analyst guidance and 53 percent trade contrarian to analysts’ guidance, which opposes the belief that individuals are a homogenous group of investors. The contrarian behavior is most common in response to analyst downgrades (i.e., purchasing after downgrades) and is most evident among individuals with better prior performance, individuals who trade infrequently, men, and older individuals. Lastly, the study provides evidence suggesting that trading contrarian to analysts is in general hazardous to individuals’ financial health. Taken together, the results indicate that individuals respond to analyst guidance and that individuals’ use of analyst guidance varies significantly with respect to their personal attributes.
3

Corporate image and reputation of large mainland enterprises listed in Hong Kong

Tso, Sophia Yuk Fai January 2007 (has links)
This research focuses on the retail investor???s perception of the corporate image and reputation of large Mainland enterprises listed in Hong Kong. Such enterprises have grown and are expected to grow, in both number and significance in the local securities market. Despite the effort to align themselves with international business practices, these enterprises are generally still perceived as being less accountable and transparent, and have a less favourable corporate image and reputation when compared to the other blue chip companies listed in Hong Kong. / Our results indicate that only three factors, namely, corporate management and communication, financial prospects, and market presence, significantly influence retail perception. Four implications arise: how companies communicate with retail investors is as important as how companies are perceived to be managed; maximising leadership driven communication, communicating clearly to retail investors the financial prospects of the company and communicating and impressing retail investors with the market presence of the company. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2007
4

Corporate image and reputation of large mainland enterprises listed in Hong Kong

Tso, Sophia Yuk Fai January 2007 (has links)
This research focuses on the retail investor???s perception of the corporate image and reputation of large Mainland enterprises listed in Hong Kong. Such enterprises have grown and are expected to grow, in both number and significance in the local securities market. Despite the effort to align themselves with international business practices, these enterprises are generally still perceived as being less accountable and transparent, and have a less favourable corporate image and reputation when compared to the other blue chip companies listed in Hong Kong. / Our results indicate that only three factors, namely, corporate management and communication, financial prospects, and market presence, significantly influence retail perception. Four implications arise: how companies communicate with retail investors is as important as how companies are perceived to be managed; maximising leadership driven communication, communicating clearly to retail investors the financial prospects of the company and communicating and impressing retail investors with the market presence of the company. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2007
5

Corporate image and reputation of large mainland enterprises listed in Hong Kong

Tso, Sophia Yuk Fai January 2007 (has links)
This research focuses on the retail investor???s perception of the corporate image and reputation of large Mainland enterprises listed in Hong Kong. Such enterprises have grown and are expected to grow, in both number and significance in the local securities market. Despite the effort to align themselves with international business practices, these enterprises are generally still perceived as being less accountable and transparent, and have a less favourable corporate image and reputation when compared to the other blue chip companies listed in Hong Kong. / Our results indicate that only three factors, namely, corporate management and communication, financial prospects, and market presence, significantly influence retail perception. Four implications arise: how companies communicate with retail investors is as important as how companies are perceived to be managed; maximising leadership driven communication, communicating clearly to retail investors the financial prospects of the company and communicating and impressing retail investors with the market presence of the company. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2007
6

Private investment and partial planning in India

Bagchi, Amiya Kumar January 1963 (has links)
No description available.
7

Essays in Return Predictability After Large Price Shocks

Unknown Date (has links)
In Essay 1, I use cross-country differences in investors’ traits — trust, patience, overconfidence, and risk tolerance — to test the underreaction, overreaction, and uncertain information theories of stock returns. I find that investors’ reactions to large daily stock price shocks vary between lower and higher levels of these traits. Specifically, investors with lower levels of trust and more patience underreact more (or overreact less) to price shocks, which aligns with the predictions of the underreaction hypothesis. Investors with higher levels of overconfidence overreact more to positive price shocks and overreact less to negative price shocks. While this finding does not conform exactly to the predictions of the overreaction hypothesis, it is consistent with more refined theories of how overconfidence affects asset prices. Investors less tolerant of risk overreact less to positive price shocks. I also find that differences in institutional characteristics affect over/underreaction. Specifically, there is less overreaction in countries with stronger investor protections and less insider trading. Additionally, the ability to sell short is associated with more overreaction to negative shocks and less overreaction to positive shocks. In Essay 2, I investigate whether publicly available information (PAI) affects over/underreaction according to predictions of several theoretical models, and then I test if differences in investors’ traits modifies the association between publicly available information and returns. After identifying and correcting for a methodological issue in some prior research, I show that in a pooled international sample of stocks, investors overreact to price shocks not accompanied by information, and also overreact (or react efficiently in some models) to information-based price shocks. I find that the effect of PAI on returns is not the same in each country, which motivates my tests on how this variability relates to differences in investor traits. My results show that investors with higher trust tend to overreact less to shocks accompanied by PAI, while investors less tolerant of risk underreact to positive price shocks. Additionally, investors with higher overconfidence and self-attribution bias overreact more to positive price shocks, but less to negative price shocks, in accordance with behavioral theories. / Includes bibliography. / Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2018. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
8

Active equity fund management: Benchmarking and trading behaviour

Lee, Adrian David, Banking & Finance, Australian School of Business, UNSW January 2009 (has links)
This thesis investigates key issues concerning how active equity fund managers add value: measuring alpha (Chapter 3), generating alpha (Chapters 4, 5 and 6) and transaction cost minimisation (Chapter 7). Chapter 3 proposes important methodological adjustments to the widely adopted benchmarking methodology of Daniel, Grinblatt, Titman and Wermers (1997). Applying this modified benchmark to a sample of active funds and simulated passive portfolios that mimic fund manager style characteristics, statistically lower tracking error is documented, compared with using the standard methodology. These findings suggest that improved specifications of characteristic benchmarks represent better methods in accurately quantifying fund manager skill. Chapter 4 examines a portfolio strategy which selects stocks using the undisclosed monthly holdings of Australian active funds. When considering a large range of strategies incorporating portfolio holdings information, the top performing strategies are robust to data-snooping and are economically and statistically significant when incorporating transaction costs. Accounting for look-ahead bias in the formation of a strategy, statistically significant alpha of at least 6.88 percent per year is found when following the best performing strategy holding 20 stocks or more in the previous month. Chapter 5 examines the relation of active equity fund managers location proximity to a stock??s corporate headquarter using portfolio holdings data. Contrary to much international research, this study reveals evidence inconsistent with a location advantage for Melbourne and Sydney-based funds. Chapter 6 examines retail investor trading on the Australian Stock Exchange. The performance of retail investors is highly heterogeneous: discount (non-discount) retail brokerage investors lose -0.59 (-0.05) percent intraday and experience negative (positive) returns over the subsequent year. These findings are inconsistent with retail investors exerting price pressure or providing liquidity to institutions. Chapter 7 examines whether equity fund managers use multiple brokers in a trade package in order to lower their price impact and brokerage costs. Using the daily trades of funds, multiple broker trades are not found to have lower costs compared to a single broker, even when controlling for the informativeness of the trade package and potential endogeneity. These findings suggest that fund managers do not lower their costs when using multiple brokers.
9

Active equity fund management: Benchmarking and trading behaviour

Lee, Adrian David, Banking & Finance, Australian School of Business, UNSW January 2009 (has links)
This thesis investigates key issues concerning how active equity fund managers add value: measuring alpha (Chapter 3), generating alpha (Chapters 4, 5 and 6) and transaction cost minimisation (Chapter 7). Chapter 3 proposes important methodological adjustments to the widely adopted benchmarking methodology of Daniel, Grinblatt, Titman and Wermers (1997). Applying this modified benchmark to a sample of active funds and simulated passive portfolios that mimic fund manager style characteristics, statistically lower tracking error is documented, compared with using the standard methodology. These findings suggest that improved specifications of characteristic benchmarks represent better methods in accurately quantifying fund manager skill. Chapter 4 examines a portfolio strategy which selects stocks using the undisclosed monthly holdings of Australian active funds. When considering a large range of strategies incorporating portfolio holdings information, the top performing strategies are robust to data-snooping and are economically and statistically significant when incorporating transaction costs. Accounting for look-ahead bias in the formation of a strategy, statistically significant alpha of at least 6.88 percent per year is found when following the best performing strategy holding 20 stocks or more in the previous month. Chapter 5 examines the relation of active equity fund managers location proximity to a stock??s corporate headquarter using portfolio holdings data. Contrary to much international research, this study reveals evidence inconsistent with a location advantage for Melbourne and Sydney-based funds. Chapter 6 examines retail investor trading on the Australian Stock Exchange. The performance of retail investors is highly heterogeneous: discount (non-discount) retail brokerage investors lose -0.59 (-0.05) percent intraday and experience negative (positive) returns over the subsequent year. These findings are inconsistent with retail investors exerting price pressure or providing liquidity to institutions. Chapter 7 examines whether equity fund managers use multiple brokers in a trade package in order to lower their price impact and brokerage costs. Using the daily trades of funds, multiple broker trades are not found to have lower costs compared to a single broker, even when controlling for the informativeness of the trade package and potential endogeneity. These findings suggest that fund managers do not lower their costs when using multiple brokers.
10

An investment decision framework for non specialist investors

Hickman, Thomas Nicolaas John 04 October 2010 (has links)
M.Comm. / Many people work for their money but do not know how to make their money work for them. The subject of investment is foreign and even daunting to many people that can potentially benefit from investing their money wisely. While earning money is something most people are actively focussed on through the application of their skills, talents and gained knowledge, not many people are so focused on or adept at the management of their money after they earned it. Such individuals include professionals like engineers, lawyers, doctors, accountants as well as managers, entrepreneurs or tradesmen. In actual fact it includes all people that have not been specifically trained or exposed to the selection and management of investments. It is for this reason that a decision framework to aid such non specialist investors in their investment decisions have been conceptualised. This study will demystify general considerations related to investments and investment management and to open the field of investment management to non specialist investors by providing them with an investment selection decision framework. The study conducted thorough research into the different investment types available as well as the considerations that go with the subject of investment and investment management. The research findings clarify why people need to invest their money, the options that exist to choose from, the distinguishing features and considerations of investments options, how to gain access to different investment options and also who the stakeholders in the investment industry are. The decision support framework combines the learnings from the research into a simple to use tool whereby potential investors are guided through structured questions to derive at a list of investment types that most likely will meet their investment needs and preferences.

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