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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Utveckling och design av spegelskåp för badrum

Gustavsson, Evelina, Schough, Camilla January 2007 (has links)
<p>This report is a documentation of a Master’s thesis of 20 credits performed at the educational program of Technical Product- and Production Development with Design at Halmstad University. The project is carried out in cooperation with Hafa AB in Halmstad.</p><p>The purpose of this project was to bring forth a concept of a bathroom cabinet for Hafa’s new selection Young through creative design methods. The selection is supposed to attract the younger purchaser but also a target group that dare to experiment with home furnishing and appreciates new design. This group is referred to as Young at Heart. </p><p>To satisfy the needs identified in the initial development phase a specific design process model was developed that originates from Ullman´s “The Mechanical Design Process” and Landqvist’s “Vilda idéer och djuplodande analys”. The realization of the project was performed in four parts; problem analysis phase, idea generation phase, realization phase and resulting phase.</p><p>In the design process it was included to carry out a thorough analysis of functionality, characteristics and design the bathroom cabinet should represent. Moreover, choice of material, construction details and lighting were other aspects of great importance for the mirror cabinet’s performance.</p><p>A great range of tools were used with the purpose of reaching understanding of the product, the industry and the design process. Through quantitative interviews with the target group and the staff at Hafa, benchmarking and trend analysis, valuable information was gathered considering the preferred characteristics and design of a bathroom cabinet.</p><p>The project resulted in a mirror cabinet representing innovative design, offering both open and concealed storage. The design differs from the competition, however represents the core values of Hafa, quality and elegance to reasonable price.</p>
2

Utveckling och design av spegelskåp för badrum

Gustavsson, Evelina, Schough, Camilla January 2007 (has links)
This report is a documentation of a Master’s thesis of 20 credits performed at the educational program of Technical Product- and Production Development with Design at Halmstad University. The project is carried out in cooperation with Hafa AB in Halmstad. The purpose of this project was to bring forth a concept of a bathroom cabinet for Hafa’s new selection Young through creative design methods. The selection is supposed to attract the younger purchaser but also a target group that dare to experiment with home furnishing and appreciates new design. This group is referred to as Young at Heart. To satisfy the needs identified in the initial development phase a specific design process model was developed that originates from Ullman´s “The Mechanical Design Process” and Landqvist’s “Vilda idéer och djuplodande analys”. The realization of the project was performed in four parts; problem analysis phase, idea generation phase, realization phase and resulting phase. In the design process it was included to carry out a thorough analysis of functionality, characteristics and design the bathroom cabinet should represent. Moreover, choice of material, construction details and lighting were other aspects of great importance for the mirror cabinet’s performance. A great range of tools were used with the purpose of reaching understanding of the product, the industry and the design process. Through quantitative interviews with the target group and the staff at Hafa, benchmarking and trend analysis, valuable information was gathered considering the preferred characteristics and design of a bathroom cabinet. The project resulted in a mirror cabinet representing innovative design, offering both open and concealed storage. The design differs from the competition, however represents the core values of Hafa, quality and elegance to reasonable price.
3

The Effects of Color on Visual Perception and Visual Clutter

Medwetz, Abigail 29 May 2019 (has links)
No description available.
4

International design project collaboration issues: comparing differences in organization and culture of American and Asia design firms

Lien, Yu Cheng January 2005 (has links)
No description available.
5

A theoretical framework for research in interior design: implications for post-secondary interior design education in Canada and the United States

Karpan, Cynthia M. 17 January 2005 (has links)
A growing number of interior design stakeholders believe that increased levels of research will lead to the legitimization of the profession, an expanded and specialized body of knowledge, professional recognition, disciplinary status, and sustainability of the profession. Despite the potential importance of research in the profession, few strategies exist for how research can have a more effective role within interior design. The main purposes of this study were to provide a strategy for incorporating research into interior design, and provide educators with information about how interior design programs could utilize the strategy. The qualitative study was based on a triangulated research design that included: (a) semi-structured telephone interviews with 29 participants (11 from educational institutions, 14 from professional practice, and 5 from professional organizations); (b) the collection of documents from all study participants; and (c) a case study, conducted over a five day period, within a professional practice firm in the United States. The study findings provide insight into the perceptions held by educators, practitioners, and members of professional organizations about research, and research in interior design specifically. These perceptions, combined with other information, led to the Theoretical Framework for Research in Interior Design. Consisting of three distinct, but interconnected, cultures: (a) design, (b) research, and (c) knowledge management, the Framework explains who, what, when, where, why, how, and with what consequences research is conducted, translated, used, and disseminated in interior design. The implications of the Framework for post-secondary interior design education programs suggest that first-professional undergraduate programs could focus on interior design, first-professional masters programs could focus on knowledge management, and post-professional masters and Ph.D. programs could focus on research. This arrangement would provide each level of post-secondary education and each program type with a specific focus, and would provide the discipline with a range of graduates capable of taking on a variety of roles within professional firms, educational institutions, professional organizations, industry, or government. Overall, the Framework provides a strategy for ensuring that the interior design profession retains its design identity, and expands and capitalizes on its research identity. At the same time, the Framework introduces a new identity that can bring designers and researchers together in more productive and beneficial ways. / February 2005
6

A theoretical framework for research in interior design: implications for post-secondary interior design education in Canada and the United States

Karpan, Cynthia M. 17 January 2005 (has links)
A growing number of interior design stakeholders believe that increased levels of research will lead to the legitimization of the profession, an expanded and specialized body of knowledge, professional recognition, disciplinary status, and sustainability of the profession. Despite the potential importance of research in the profession, few strategies exist for how research can have a more effective role within interior design. The main purposes of this study were to provide a strategy for incorporating research into interior design, and provide educators with information about how interior design programs could utilize the strategy. The qualitative study was based on a triangulated research design that included: (a) semi-structured telephone interviews with 29 participants (11 from educational institutions, 14 from professional practice, and 5 from professional organizations); (b) the collection of documents from all study participants; and (c) a case study, conducted over a five day period, within a professional practice firm in the United States. The study findings provide insight into the perceptions held by educators, practitioners, and members of professional organizations about research, and research in interior design specifically. These perceptions, combined with other information, led to the Theoretical Framework for Research in Interior Design. Consisting of three distinct, but interconnected, cultures: (a) design, (b) research, and (c) knowledge management, the Framework explains who, what, when, where, why, how, and with what consequences research is conducted, translated, used, and disseminated in interior design. The implications of the Framework for post-secondary interior design education programs suggest that first-professional undergraduate programs could focus on interior design, first-professional masters programs could focus on knowledge management, and post-professional masters and Ph.D. programs could focus on research. This arrangement would provide each level of post-secondary education and each program type with a specific focus, and would provide the discipline with a range of graduates capable of taking on a variety of roles within professional firms, educational institutions, professional organizations, industry, or government. Overall, the Framework provides a strategy for ensuring that the interior design profession retains its design identity, and expands and capitalizes on its research identity. At the same time, the Framework introduces a new identity that can bring designers and researchers together in more productive and beneficial ways.
7

A theoretical framework for research in interior design: implications for post-secondary interior design education in Canada and the United States

Karpan, Cynthia M. 17 January 2005 (has links)
A growing number of interior design stakeholders believe that increased levels of research will lead to the legitimization of the profession, an expanded and specialized body of knowledge, professional recognition, disciplinary status, and sustainability of the profession. Despite the potential importance of research in the profession, few strategies exist for how research can have a more effective role within interior design. The main purposes of this study were to provide a strategy for incorporating research into interior design, and provide educators with information about how interior design programs could utilize the strategy. The qualitative study was based on a triangulated research design that included: (a) semi-structured telephone interviews with 29 participants (11 from educational institutions, 14 from professional practice, and 5 from professional organizations); (b) the collection of documents from all study participants; and (c) a case study, conducted over a five day period, within a professional practice firm in the United States. The study findings provide insight into the perceptions held by educators, practitioners, and members of professional organizations about research, and research in interior design specifically. These perceptions, combined with other information, led to the Theoretical Framework for Research in Interior Design. Consisting of three distinct, but interconnected, cultures: (a) design, (b) research, and (c) knowledge management, the Framework explains who, what, when, where, why, how, and with what consequences research is conducted, translated, used, and disseminated in interior design. The implications of the Framework for post-secondary interior design education programs suggest that first-professional undergraduate programs could focus on interior design, first-professional masters programs could focus on knowledge management, and post-professional masters and Ph.D. programs could focus on research. This arrangement would provide each level of post-secondary education and each program type with a specific focus, and would provide the discipline with a range of graduates capable of taking on a variety of roles within professional firms, educational institutions, professional organizations, industry, or government. Overall, the Framework provides a strategy for ensuring that the interior design profession retains its design identity, and expands and capitalizes on its research identity. At the same time, the Framework introduces a new identity that can bring designers and researchers together in more productive and beneficial ways.
8

The British domestic interior 1880 to 1914 : a study of fixed decoration in middle-class housing

Long, Helen Clare January 1990 (has links)
No description available.
9

The Travelling New Media Centre

Shields, Jason 08 February 2017 (has links)
In contemporary society, advanced forms of technology and new media artworks are becoming more prevalent in the public realm each year. Nevertheless, many Canadians do not have access to the resources that enable them to critically analyze and interact with new forms of technology and new media artwork. This practicum intends to address this by creating a unique environment known as The Travelling New Media Centre. The design concept consists of exhibition and education spaces that address topics related to technology and new media in contemporary culture. The Travelling New Media Centre takes place in VIA Rail baggage cars with modified interior architecture that consists of interactive exhibitions using a contemporary and historical perspective. Site selection is based on communities that have minimal access to technology and little exposure to contemporary new media works. The train travels to the following northern Manitoba communities: Thicket Portage, Pikwitonei, and Ilford. / February 2017
10

An Investigation of Psychophysical Color Phenomena and their Application to Interior Design

Robinson, Donald I. 08 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to analyze and select those psycho-physical color phenomena adaptable to interior design. Among these are phenomena relating to variations in intensity and purity, visual stimulation, spatial relationships, and psychological factors; this study contains suggestions for possible application of these phenomena to strengthen the quality of interior environments.

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