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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A PACKAGE PROGRAM TO TEACH BEHAVIORAL CONSULTATION INTERVIEW: AN ANALOGUE STUDY

Brown, Douglas Kirby January 1980 (has links)
An instructional package is presented for training pre-intern psychologists in behavioral interviewing techniques. A specific interview format, the Problem Identification Interview, was combined with microsetting technology to provide an efficient method of training consultation verbal skills. The instructional package was evaluated with a multiple baseline across subjects design. Results of the study indicated that verbal skills specific to the interviewing format were acquired when the instructional package was used. The acquired skills were maintained across several experimental sessions and at a two month follow-up. A social validation questionnaire revealed that subjects of the study found the training to be preferable to traditional methods and relevant to future applied practice. The implications of this study for the training of psychologists and other professionals providing problem solving services were discussed.
2

Individual and family dynamics in individual therapy :: an analysis of intake reports.

Jacobus, Stéphane I. 01 January 1990 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
3

PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION AGREEMENT IN BEHAVIORAL AND PSYCHODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT INTERVIEWS.

LeBlanc, Cobbie P. January 1983 (has links)
This study questions whether it is possible to show greater interviewer agreement on client's problems as a result of training. The study examined the comparison of the behavioral assessment interview, the psychodynamic assessment interview, and a no-training control interview. Additionally, four other dependent variables were examined which related to effectiveness of interview format: proportion of problems identified of those mentioned by the client, number of problems mentioned by the client, total number of problems identified by the interviewer, and number of interviewer errors per interview. The results demonstrated that behavioral interviewers had significantly higher agreement than the psychodynamic and no-training control. Behavioral interviewers were also significantly comprehensive in that they better identified a higher proportion of the problems mentioned by clients than the other two groups. Consistently, although not significantly, the behavioral interviewers identified more problems overall than the other two groups, although the number of problems mentioned by clients did not vary by group. The surprising findings of the study is that behavioral interviewers made significantly more errors per interview than the others, despite their effectiveness in obtaining interviewer agreement on client problem reports.
4

The comparative effectiveness of eight counselor verbal responses in a natural counseling setting

Caldeira, Laureen January 1980 (has links)
No description available.
5

THE EFFECT OF INTERVIEW REPLAY ON CLIENT MOVEMENT TOWARD PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH

Huff, Vaughn E., 1935- January 1966 (has links)
No description available.
6

Effects of an intake interview on client anxiety and depression

Krippner, Kevin M. January 1988 (has links)
The basic purpose of the study was to examine the effects of intake interviews an the anxiety and depression of clients. It was hypothesized that intake interviews would reduce symptomology, as it has been shown that even brief interactions with clinicians can be beneficial. Gender of both client and counselor were also examined for main effects and/or interactions. No difference in symptomology based on gender of client or counselor was anticipated.Two hundred ninety-nine adult out-patients of a university training practicum clinic were administered anxiety and depression inventories either before or after intake interviews. Intake interviews were performed by doctoral or masters level students assigned to fellowship duties at the clinic.The intake interview consisted of two parts. The First part was the gathering of relevant demographic information and questions which solicited information about the problems clients were experiencing which prompted the need For counseling. The second part of the intake consisted of a testing battery composed of the Beck Depression Inventory (SDI), Speilberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Tennessee Self-Concept Scale CTSCS). Only the BDI and State component of the STAI were used in the study.Each of the parts in the intake took approximately 45 minutes to complete. Intakes were scheduled in two-hour time blocks which allowed sufficient time For completion of the entire intake. The experimental manipulation was accomplished by having counselors alternate the order of the interview and assessment battery.The design of the study was a 2 x 2 x 2 (order of interview/assessment battery, client gender, counselor gender). Analysis of the data was performed using a Multiple Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) procedure.There were no significant results for any of the BDI score analyses, and only one significant result For the STAI score analyses. The intake interview was not found to affect the anxiety or depression of clients, failing to support the main hypothesis of the study. Depression and anxiety were also not affected by client gender. However, anxiety was significantly lower for clients of Female vs. male counselors. Depression was not affected. No interactions were found to be significant. / Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
7

Clients' reaction to initial interviews a study of relationship-formation /

Tessler, Richard C. January 1972 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1972. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 110-114).
8

Interpreting within a South African psychiatric hospital : a detailed account of what happens in practice

Kilian, Sanja 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (PhD)--Stellenbosch University, 2013. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: It is more than 18 years since South Africa became a democratic country. However, many South Africans are still discriminated against when accessing state services, such as healthcare services (Drennan, 1999). The problem is that healthcare practitioners, in the higher positions of the healthcare system, are commonly made up of professionals who speak only one or at most two of South Africa’s official languages (Swartz, 1998). Due to the lack of funding ad hoc arrangements are made for interpreter-services (Drennan, 1999). Anyone available that can speak even a fragment of the patient’s language, such as nurses, household aides and security guards are called to act as interpreters (Drennan, 1999; Smith, 2011). In many clinical settings, although not ideal, it is possible to treat patients even if there are minimal shared communicative resources (Anthonissen & Meyer, 2008). However, in psychiatric care, language is the primary diagnostic tool, and is one of the central instruments through which patients voice their symptoms (Westermeyer & Janca, 1997). In the Western Cape (one of the nine provinces in South Africa), clinicians working in psychiatric care are mainly fluent in English and Afrikaans. Many Black isiXhosa-speaking patients are not proficient in these languages. The aim of this dissertation is to gain a better understanding of the language barriers facing isiXhosa-speaking patients by focusing on natural conversations, which take place during psychiatric interviews within a particular psychiatric institution in the Western Cape. I made video-recordings of interpreter-mediated psychiatric interviews (n=13) as well as psychiatric interviews (n=12) conducted without the use of an interpreter. In addition, I had discussions (i.e. through semi-structured interviews) with registrars, interpreters and patients to understand their views about issues related to language barriers and interpreting practices. I used an ethnographic approach and the method of Conversation Analysis to understand the study findings. The findings, derived from the psychiatric interviews that were not interpreter-mediated, suggest that the Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients had great difficulty communicating with the registrars. The findings (emerging from the interpreter-mediated encounters and semi-structured interviews), strongly suggest that the haphazard use of hospital employees, who are not trained and employed to act as interpreters, have a significant impact on the goals of the psychiatric interview. In some instances, the use of ad hoc interpreters positively contributed to the successful achievement of the goals of the psychiatric interview. In most instances, the use of ad hoc interpreters inhibited the successful achievement of the goals of the psychiatric interview. One of the most significant findings was that interpreters’ interpretations of patients’ words at times suggest that patients appear to be more psychiatrically ill (increasing the risk for over-diagnosis) than it appears when looking at patients’ original responses. In essence, the lack of language services is unjust towards patients, clinicians, hospital staff acting as ad hoc interpreters, and LEP patients caught in a system, which construct them as voiceless, dependent, powerless, healthcare users. / AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Suid-Afrika is vir die afgelope 18 jaar `n demokratiese land, maar ongeag die afskaffing van apartheid word daar steeds teen baie Suid-Afrikaners gediskrimineer. Dit is veral die geval wanneer Suid-Afrikaners gebruik maak van gesondheidsdienste (Drennan, 1999). Baie gesondheidspraktisyne of dokters is alleenlik vaardig in een of op die meeste twee offisiële Suid-Afrikaanse tale (Swartz, 1998). Ongelukkig weens `n gebrek aan fondse, is die meeste hospitale nie instaat om amptelike tolke in diens te neem nie. Gevolglik word ad hoc reëlings getref wanneer pasiënte tolkdienste benodig. Gewoonlik word enige iemand, insluitende verpleegsters, skoonmakers en sekuriteitswagte, wat selfs net tot `n sekere mate die pasiënt se taal kan praat, gebruik as tolke (Drennan, 1999; Smith, 2011). Die gebrek aan tolkdienste is veral problematies wanneer dit kom by psigiatriese dienste. Dit is omdat in psigiatrie word taal en kommunikasie as primêre diagnostiese instrument gebruik, en pasiënte gebruik hoofsaaklik taal om hul simptome en ervaringe met die dokter mee te deel (Westermeyer & Janca, 1997). In die Wes-Kaap (een van Suid-Afrika se nege provinsies) is die meeste dokters wat in psigiatriese instansies werk hoofsaaklik Engels en / of Afrikaans-sprekend. Baie Swart isiXhosa-sprekende pasiënte, wat gebruik maak van psigiatriese staatsdienste, is egter nie vlot in Afrikaans en Engels nie. Die doel van my proefskrif is om hierdie probleem, wat baie siXhosa-sprekende pasiënte in die gesig staar, beter te verstaan. Ek het besluit om dit te doen deur te fokus op `n spesifieke aspek – natuurlike gesprekke tussen dokters en isiXhosa-sprekende pasiënte. Dokters en pasiënte kommunikeer onder andere gedurende psigiatriese onderhoude, en ek het besluit om video opnames van psigiatriese onderhoude te maak. Ek het die video opnames in `n spesifieke hospitaal in die Wes-Kaap gemaak. Die video opnames het ingesluit psigiatriese onderhoude (n=12) waarin die dokter en pasiënt in Engels kommunikeer, sowel as onderhoude (n=13) waarin die dokter en pasiënt deur middel van (d.m.v) `n ad hoc tolk kommunikeer. Ek het ook gesprekke gevoer (deur middel van semi-gestruktureerde onderhoude) met pasiënte, dokters, en ad hoc tolke om hulle insigte en opinies rakende die bogenoemde taalkwessies beter te verstaan. Verder het ek `n ethnografiese benadering en gespreksanaliese gebruik om die data te benader en verstaan. Die bevindinge wat voortgevloei het uit die psigiatriese onderhoude (beide waarin daar nie `n tolk gebruik was nie, sowel as die waarin daar `n tolk gebruik was) suggereer dat die gebrek aan tolkdienste dikwels die doel van psigiatriese onderhoud ondermyn. Dit komvoor dat in die psigiatriese onderhoude, waarin daar nie tolk gebruik was nie, die pasiënte dit baie moeilik gevind het om met die dokters in Engels te kommunkeer. Dit is waarskynlik omdat hulle nie oor die nodige taalvaardighede beskik om hulleself ten volle in Engels uit te druk nie. Dit kom wel voor dat in sommige gevalle gedurende die psigiatriese onderhoude, waarin die dokters en pasiënte d.m.v.`n tolk gekommunikeer het, het die gebruik van `n tolk `n positiewe impak gehad. Die probleem is egter dat in baie gevalle het dit geblyk het die gebruik van tolke `n ongewenste impak gehad. Een van die belangrikste voorbeelde hiervan is dat die tolke se weergawes van die pasiënte se woorde, dit dikwels laat voorkom asof pasiënte nie juis veel insig in hulle psigiatriese versteurings gehad het nie. Wanneer daar egter gekyk word na die pasiënte se oorspronklike weergawes is dit duidelik dat sommige pasiënte wel insig gehad het. Die bevindinge suggereer hoofsaaklik dat die gebrek aan offisieel en opgeleide tolkdienste onregverdig is teenoor die pasiënte, ad hoc tolke, en die dokters. Dit dra ook by tot `n gesondsheids-sisteem waarin isiXhosa-sprekende pasiënt uitgebeeld word as afhanklik, tot `n groot mate magteloos en sonder `n sê.
9

TELEVISED MODELLING AND STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE TRAINING IN BEHAVIORAL CONSULTATION INTERVIEWING

Koussa, Richard Karem, 1949- January 1981 (has links)
A program for the training of graduate student consultants in behavioral interviewing skills is presented. The initial interview of behavioral consultation, problem identification, was taught. The training program involved a videotape interview between a consultant and consultee in which appropriate verbalizations specific to the problem identification interview were modeled and/or specific problem identification objectives were narrated. Sixty graduate student consultants were trained using either or both of these techniques. The consultants later had the opportunity to role-play a problem identification interview to demonstrate the consultation skills acquired through observation of the modeling and/or the narrated instructions. This role-played interview was audio-recorded and the verbalized statements coded on the Consultation Analysis Record, a technique in which independent verbalized statements are coded on four categories. These coded statements were statistically analyzed in order to determine the effectiveness of the training program in training the problem identification interview. The training program was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance design. Results of the study indicated that verbal skills specific to problem identification interview were acquired when modeled training alone was used. No skills acquisition resulted in the instruction only or the modeling plus instruction training conditions. The implications of this study for the training of psychologists in behavioral consultation are discussed. This investigation lent support for the use of modeling as a training technique and the Consultation Analysis Record as a systematic method of the behavioral assessment of interviewing skills.

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