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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The morphology and development of intestinal folds and villi in vertebrates

Hilton, William A. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Cornell University. / Reprinted from the American Journal of Anatomy, vol. 1, no. 4. Includes bibliographical references (p. 488-491).
2

Effect of a previous distention of the intestine on reflex inhibition of gastric motility

Lalich, Joseph John. Herrin, Raymond Clyde. Meek, Walter Joseph, January 1936 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1936. / Typescript. Reprinted from the Proceedings of the Society for experimental biology and medicine, 1936, 29-31. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record.
3

An essay on wounds of the intestines

Smith, Thomas, January 3705 (has links)
Thesis (M.D.)--University of Pennsylvania, 1805. / Microform version available in the Readex Early American Imprints series.
4

The morphology and development of intestinal folds and villi in vertebrates

Hilton, William A. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Cornell University. / Reprinted from the American Journal of Anatomy, vol. 1, no. 4. Includes bibliographical references (p. 488-491).
5

Intestinal obstruction, an experimental study of the intoxication in closed intestinal loops ...

Dragstedt, Lester R. Moorhead, James J., Burcky, Fred W., January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (PH. D.)--University of Chicago, 1920. / "Private edition, distributed by the University of Chicago libraries, Chicago, Illinois." Caption title: Intestinal obstruction ... by Lester R. Dragstedt, James J. Moorehead ... and Fred W. Burcky. "Reprinted from the Journal of experimental medicine, vol. XXV, no. 3, March, 1917." Bibliography: p. 439. Also available on the Internet.
6

The effects of diet on the intestinal flora ...

Cannon, Paul Roberts. Dragstedt, Lester Reynold. Dragstedt, Carl Albert. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Chicago, 1921. / "Private edition, distributed by the University of Chicago libraries, Chicago, Illinois." Reprinted from the Journal of infectious diseases, vol. XXVII, no. 2, and vol. XXIX, no. 4, August, 1920, and October, 1921." Also available on the Internet.
7

Associations between stable psychological characteristics and timing of surgery in inflammatory bowel disease /

Argall, Rosemary. January 2006 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (B.Psy.Sc.(Hons.)) - University of Queensland, 2006. / Includes bibliography.
8

The occurrence and epidemiology of intestinal spirochaetes in humans in Western Australia /

Brooke, Celia Josephine. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Murdoch University, 2003. / Thesis submitted to the Division of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences. Bibliography: leaves 171-191.
9

Neurotensin and its receptors in human isolated intestine in health and disease : focus on motility aspects

Azriel, Yael, Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
Neurotensin (NT) is a brain-gut peptide, localised to mucosal endocrine N-cells in the gastrointestinal tract. The most potent stimuli for NT release are ingested fats. NT, in vivo, inhibits the migrating myoelectric complex and stimulates colonic motility. The aim of this thesis was to investigate NT and its receptors in human isolated intestine, focusing on motility aspects. ???Normal??? colon and ileum were obtained from patients undergoing resection for carcinoma, and ???disease??? colon was obtained from patients undergoing resection for ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn???s disease (CD), diverticular disease (DD) and slow transit constipation (STC). In functional experiments with ???normal??? ascending and sigmoid colon, NT contracted taenia coli strips by direct mechanisms (EC50 ??? 100 nM). In circular muscle (CM) strips, contractions were mediated by NT-induced release of enteric mediators (indirect actions), which were regionally specific, as well as by direct actions on the smooth muscle. In contrast, in ???normal??? terminal ileum, the predominant action of NT was a potent (EC50 ??? 3 nM), directly mediated inhibition of spontaneous contractions in longitudinal muscle strips. NT receptors were characterised using radioligand binding with [125I]-NT and [3H]-NT, and localised using autoradiography and immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. In the sigmoid colon, binding sites corresponded to NTS1 receptors and could be visualised on the smooth muscle and the enteric ganglia, supporting both direct and neuronal actions for NT, respectively. In the ileum, a similar distribution of binding sites could be visualised. In gastrointestinal disease, NT contractile responses were reduced in UC, DD and STC colon CM strips, but were unchanged in CD. In contrast, NT responses in all diseases were largely unchanged in TC strips, suggesting disease/treatment-induced alterations in NT mechanisms. In UC, cholinergic mechanisms appeared to be altered, whereas in DD disease, prostaglandin mechanisms were affected. In STC, there was an apparent loss of a normally predominant component in NT-mechanisms, but contractile mechanisms appeared to be retained. In summary, these studies demonstrated regional and muscle layer specific actions and mechanisms of action for NT, and support alterations in enteric signaling in disease.
10

NF-κB signalling pathway regulation in intestinal epithelial cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria and metagenomic clones

Ferraria, Vanessa January 2013 (has links)
The study of the human microbiota is of enormous importance because it represents a significant diverse microbial population that co-habits the intestine and influences host physiology, immune homeostasis, gene and protein expression and, importantly, overall health status. The microbiota is crucial in regulation of immune tolerance. Epithelial cells are considered an important cell population involved in host microbial interactions as they are the first intact cell layer in contact with bacteria colonizing the gut. Understanding how bacteria influence the host response in health and in disease may improve the understanding of how inflammation and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) develop and also provide insights into which bacterial population promote health and maintain immune homeostasis. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the response of epithelial cells to commensal and pathogenic bacteria and metagenomic clones (derived from the human gut microbiota). Both commensal and pathogenic bacteria present microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) that are recognised by innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The mechanisms by which commensal bacteria maintain immune tolerance in the gut, whereas pathogens induce strong immune responses, are not fully understood. We investigated the hypothesis that commensal bacteria control immune homeostasis, in part, by regulating NF-κB mediated signalling. In particular, the effect of specific gut microbes on the expression of the NF-κB repressor A20, a zinc protein that is encoded by TNFAIP3 gene, which induces strong down-regulation of the canonical NF-kB pathway was investigated. This thesis revealed that immune regulation by both pathogenic and commensal bacteria involves both positive and negative regulation of the NF-kB pathway mediated by specific MAMPs and metabolites. The significance of these findings in relation to immune homeostasis and inflammation are discussed

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