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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

K-12 Teachers and Learners in an Electronic World: A Review of the Literature. Part I: Context, Learning Outcomes and Pedagogical Implications

Janes, Diane, Macfadyen, Leah P., Hawkes, Beth January 2004 (has links)
Current literature relating to information and communication technologies (ICT) in K-12 teaching and learning offers positive and cautionary perspectives. Overall, there exists great optimism about the benefits of ICT-mediated learning for students. Below, we review literature on ICTs in K-12 education, with emphasis on technology-supported constructivist learning, the challenges and pedagogical implications of educational technologies, changing roles for teachers, and technology in the classroom. In Part II, we will review literature on K-12 learner issues that can affect successful learning using ICTs. We will report on learner satisfaction with online learning, current thinking on skills of successful online students, and existing theoretical discussions of technology and learning styles. We will review student diversity and ICT-mediated learning, student differences, which challenge online learning, and the opportunities offered by ICTs for particular subgroups of learners. Overall, we offer a snapshot of current literature on effectiveness of ICT-mediated learning from the perspective of the K-12 learner.
2

K-12 Teachers and Learners in an Electronic World: A Review of the Literature. Part II: Learner Issues in ICT-mediated Learning

Macfadyen, Leah P. Janes, Diane Hawkes, Beth January 2004 (has links)
Current literature relating to information and communication technologies (ICT) in K-12 teaching and learning offers positive and cautionary perspectives. Overall, there exists great optimism about the benefits of ICT-mediated learning for students. Previously, we reviewed literature on ICTs in K-12 education, with emphasis on technology-supported constructivist learning, the challenges and pedagogical implications of educational technologies, changing roles for teachers, and technology in the classroom. Below, we review K-12 literature on learner issues that can affect successful learning using ICTs. We report on learner satisfaction with online learning, current thinking on skills of successful online students, and existing theoretical discussions of technology and learning styles. We review student diversity and ICT-mediated learning, student differences which challenge online learning, and the opportunities offered by ICTs for particular subgroups of learners. Overall, we offer a snapshot of current literature on effectiveness of ICT-mediated learning from the perspective of the K-12 learner.
3

Mapping Multiliteracies onto the Pedagogy of K-12 Teachers

Main, Kristin Lee 09 June 2011 (has links)
This qualitative research maps multiliteracies onto the pedagogy of teachers of kindergarten through grade 12. It examines how teachers ready their students to become multiliterate beings, that is, how teachers approach literacy in a manner that is reflective of the diversity of students in order to prepare them for their futures in a competitive digital world. Twenty teachers from Northwestern Ontario were selected using intensity sampling to participate in audio-taped interviews. The sample included three teachers from each of the elementary grades (kindergarten, primary, junior and intermediate) and eight teachers from the secondary panel (intermediate/senior). Teachers were nominated by school administrators and curriculum leaders based on a provided list of multiliteracies indicators. An interview guide was used to isolate elements of the content of multiliteracies (designing processes) and the form (situated practice, overt instruction, critical framing and transformed practice). One teacher from each of the four elementary grade divisions, as well as two teachers from the secondary level were observed and participated in follow-up interviews. Individual interviews were coded using a deductive frame as well as constant comparison. The observational field notes and follow-up interviews were used as triangulation to enrich the interview data. Excel and macros were used to organize the data. Findings document teachers’ conscious inclusions of content reflective of student subjectivities as well as the need for teachers to continue to challenge the role of literacy as more than compensatory education. Teachers’ pedagogies were rooted in engaging students and demonstrated a focus on the affective needs of students that reached beyond multiliteracies theory. Both critical literacies and information technology were integrated into pedagogy, although teachers reported feelings of low confidence and the desire for additional professional development opportunities. Other findings that emerged emphasized a range in orientations to student risk in literacy learning and strong alignments with provincial protocol. This study advances the research field by describing connections between multiliteracies as a theoretical frame and teachers’ perceptions of their literacy practices across grades K-12 and highlights ways in which multiliteracies can extend literacy pedagogy.
4

Mapping Multiliteracies onto the Pedagogy of K-12 Teachers

Main, Kristin Lee 09 June 2011 (has links)
This qualitative research maps multiliteracies onto the pedagogy of teachers of kindergarten through grade 12. It examines how teachers ready their students to become multiliterate beings, that is, how teachers approach literacy in a manner that is reflective of the diversity of students in order to prepare them for their futures in a competitive digital world. Twenty teachers from Northwestern Ontario were selected using intensity sampling to participate in audio-taped interviews. The sample included three teachers from each of the elementary grades (kindergarten, primary, junior and intermediate) and eight teachers from the secondary panel (intermediate/senior). Teachers were nominated by school administrators and curriculum leaders based on a provided list of multiliteracies indicators. An interview guide was used to isolate elements of the content of multiliteracies (designing processes) and the form (situated practice, overt instruction, critical framing and transformed practice). One teacher from each of the four elementary grade divisions, as well as two teachers from the secondary level were observed and participated in follow-up interviews. Individual interviews were coded using a deductive frame as well as constant comparison. The observational field notes and follow-up interviews were used as triangulation to enrich the interview data. Excel and macros were used to organize the data. Findings document teachers’ conscious inclusions of content reflective of student subjectivities as well as the need for teachers to continue to challenge the role of literacy as more than compensatory education. Teachers’ pedagogies were rooted in engaging students and demonstrated a focus on the affective needs of students that reached beyond multiliteracies theory. Both critical literacies and information technology were integrated into pedagogy, although teachers reported feelings of low confidence and the desire for additional professional development opportunities. Other findings that emerged emphasized a range in orientations to student risk in literacy learning and strong alignments with provincial protocol. This study advances the research field by describing connections between multiliteracies as a theoretical frame and teachers’ perceptions of their literacy practices across grades K-12 and highlights ways in which multiliteracies can extend literacy pedagogy.
5

Real Parenting in a Virtual World: Roles of Parents in Online Mathematics Courses

Cwetna, Karla Goldhahn 13 May 2016 (has links)
Enrollment in K-12 online courses continues to rise substantially each year (Evergreen Education Group, 2015). As the number of students taking courses online increases, the number of parents parenting in online courses also increases. This qualitative exploratory case study, bounded by the online program that was studied, was performed to better understand parents’ perceptions of their roles in online high school mathematics courses. Eighty-seven parents participated in an online questionnaire which elicited both quantitative and qualitative responses. Guided by the major tenets of symbolic interactionism theoretical framework, these responses were combined with data from six interviews to investigate why parents chose to enroll their children in online mathematics courses, their expectations pertaining to the online mathematics course, and their perceived roles and responsibilities in the online mathematics course. Through a detailed process of analyzing the questionnaire and interview data, nine themes emerged: (a) participant parents enrolled their children in online mathematics courses to remove their child from a negative social environment and to avoid distractions in the traditional setting; (b) participant parents want their children to have the flexibility to work ahead of their peers; (c) the school should provide quality curriculum and resources for teachers, students, and parents; (d) teachers should identify and address when students need help; (e) teachers should be available and approachable; (f) students should put forth their best effort; (g) students should ask for help when they experience difficulty understanding a new concept; (h) participant parents monitor to make sure their children are completing assignments and asking for help; and (i) participant parents help their children by re-teaching mathematics concepts or encouraging the child to seek help from others. This study has theoretical and practical significance by adding to literature investigating parental roles in mathematics education and providing insight on the nature of parental involvement in an online high school mathematics program. Consistent with relevant literature (Currie-Rubin & Smith, 2014; Curtis, 2013; Thurber, 2013), results of this study call upon educators to invest in efforts that enhance understanding of parents’ perspectives in an effort to strengthen parental involvement in online mathematics courses. INDEX WORDS: Mathematics, Online learning, Online mathematics, K-12 online learning, Virtual learning, Parental involvement, Parental engagement, Parental roles, Interactions, Teacher responsibilities, Student responsibilities, Success, Perceptions of success, Flexibility
6

A Survey of Factors Which Influence Teachers' Use of Computer-based Technology

Jaber, William E. 18 August 1997 (has links)
Current literature is plentiful on computer-based technology's influence on students. There are only a few studies which have looked at the influence that computer-based technology has on teachers. This is a study of factors which influence teachers' use of computer-based technology. It is based on inconsistencies in previous studies, areas not addressed in previous surveys and the dramatic changes in computer-based technology and Internet access using Web browsers since the previous surveys on computer-based technology were conducted. A survey was conducted of K-12 teachers in two rural county school systems. One was in southern West Virginia and the other was in southwestern Virginia. This survey found that computer access in the classroom influenced the frequency of use for some instructional activities. Lack of Internet access and obsolete computer equipment resulted in a negative influence to the teachers use of computer-based technology in the classroom. Teachers also expressed a desire for a continuous type of training program for the use of computers. / Ph. D.
7

People not Print: Exploring Engineering Future Possible Self Development in Rural Areas of Tennessee's Cumberland Plateau

Boynton, Matthew Arnold 06 February 2014 (has links)
This study explores how students in rural areas of Tennessee's Cumberland Plateau area perceive engineering as a future career. This area is a portion of the greater Appalachian region, which has historically, faced disproportionate economic struggles when compared to other areas of the United States. However, little research on career choice exists outside of the coal producing areas of Central Appalachia. This research, in contrast, focuses on rural counties without interstate access, situated along the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee, an area with an economy historically based in manufacturing. This research focuses on understanding students' perceptions of engineering as a future career and on factors that support and inhibit the development of these perceptions. To understand these perceptions, the study used qualitative, semi-structured interviews, situated in a Social Constructivist worldview, informed by the Future Possible Selves framework. Participants include 27 high school students, 7 college engineering students, and 5 college students who had exposure to engineering through a formal program but are currently enrolled in another major. Results of the study show that without access to formal programs or professionals to expose them to engineering, participants did not have a clear perception of engineering, and were not likely to pursue this career. Exposure through a formal program seemed to spark the start of engineering future possible self development by aligning engineering with activities participants enjoy. However, these participants often also believed that they lacked some key "ability" needed to become an engineer. Participants who had access to both formal programs and professionals were able to provide a clear description of potential engineering careers, aligning such careers with activities they enjoyed and, importantly, with desired attributes of their future. In addition, participants typically described relationships with professionals as mitigating the fear that an engineering career was beyond their "ability." These results provide evidence, that in this study area, printed materials and programs are not enough; people clearly make the difference in helping students develop a clear perception of engineering as a viable future career choice. This result has multiple implications for engineering educators and industries interested in K-12 outreach. / Ph. D.
8

Summer Engineering Academies: Developing Participant Self-Efficacy in Engineering

Heiselt, Nathan Eric 13 December 2014 (has links)
With the growing concern over the reduction of university students pursuing degrees in STEM fields, there are a number of entities sponsoring and implementing programs for young people in order to promote interest in and self-efficacy for these fields. Summer Engineering Academies (SEAs) are implemented in a variety of settings by stakeholders with a single purpose: to expose young people to the fields and work of engineers in the hope of recruiting them. This study is seeks to identify whether any positive changes to the self-efficacy of the participants occurs through the curricula of the program. This self-efficacy can be the driving force for many young people as they feel that they are both capable of success in addition to the desire to pursue a career in the field. The SEAs in this study serve a variety of age groups and specialized demographic sub-groups; of greatest interest is the possible impact of these programs on traditionally under-represented groups. Each program hosts a specific demographic sub-group but they all share specific pedagogical practices in order to identify which may emerge as best practices in affecting change on the self-efficacy of the participants toward engineering. A secondary purpose was to identify which, if any, practices had a positive impact on the participants’ self-efficacy and presume those as best practices across demographics. The programs were found to have a positive effect on the participants as identified through focus groups, journal entries, and personal interviews with the students. There were no identifiable differences in the impact of the practices between the subgroups. Each subgroup had gains in self-efficacy from each of the instructional practices which may allow for the distinction of best practice to be used in their description. These practices include: the use mentors or role models in face to face experiences; hands-on learning with tangible results; and recognizable real-world applications. Each practice yielded a positive result, but none of them appeared to be more successful with any group than the others. This allows them each to be considered a productive instructional strategy for the increase of self-efficacy of participants toward engineering.
9

An examination of the characteristics, duties, and training needs of district level technology coordinators in Mississippi school districts

Webster, Vicki Michelle Nash 07 August 2010 (has links)
The primary purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics, duties, and training needs of district level technology coordinators in Mississippi school districts. Prior research was limited on the role of technology coordinators in the United States, and no research was found in the literature that focused specifically on technology coordinators at the district level in Mississippi. The research design for the study was descriptive. A survey instrument was used to collect demographic data. The survey was emailed to 138 technology coordinators. There were 4 technology coordinators that opted out of the survey, 8 emails were bounced back to the research and 55 responded for a response rate of 43.6%. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data for the 4 research questions. The results of this study indicated that district technology coordinators in Mississippi have a multitude of responsibilities that vary greatly. The majority of participants in this study are responsible for duties that range from working one-on-one with teachers, installing and troubleshooting hardware and software, purchasing technology resources, planning technology related professional development activities for other staff members, as well as other duties. A majority of respondents indicated that they needed additional training to perform their duties effectively. Participants were given the opportunity to rank their most important training needs as administrative, technical, or educational research oriented. Administrative training was chosen as more important than any other training need.
10

K-12 Public School Teacher Perceptions Regarding their Experiences as Instructors Who Volunteered to Teach in the Online Learning Environment in 2020-2021 (COVID-19)

Ball, Miranda Myers 20 April 2022 (has links)
In this study, the topic of K-12 public school online learning is addressed in the context of the pandemic-related circumstances of 2020 and 2021. The study used a qualitative analysis of data sources in the form of one-on-one interviews. The study examined teachers' input regarding factors they believe impacted academic outcomes for students in the online learning environment in 2020-2021. A total of 15 K-12 public school teachers who volunteered to provide instruction in the online learning environment during the 2020-2021 school year participated in a one-on-one semi-structured interview. The questions asked during the interview were organized in sections according to themes that were reviewed in the review of literature and existing research components of this study: professional development, pedagogy, learner engagement, and equity in the K-12 online learning environment. Findings and conclusions from this study offer multiple considerations for future planning and implementation of K-12 public school instruction in the fully online learning environment. Instructors need adequate and advanced preparation and professional development that is intentionally focused on the fully online learning environment. Parents and students need to have an understanding of the expectations of active engagement in the fully online learning environment. Consistent and clear communication about expectations of learners is a predominant factor in ensuring increased student achievement in the K-12 public school fully online learning environment. / Doctor of Education / In this study, the topic of K-12 public school online learning is addressed in the context of the pandemic-related circumstances of 2020 and 2021. The study examined teachers' input regarding factors they believe impacted academic outcomes for students in the online learning environment in 2020-2021. A total of 15 K-12 public school teachers who volunteered to provide instruction in the online learning environment during the 2020-2021 school year participated in a one-on-one interviews. The topics of professional development, pedagogy, learner engagement, and equity in the K-12 online learning environment were addressed by the interview questions. The results of this study offer multiple considerations for future planning and implementation of K-12 public school instruction in the fully online learning environment. Instructors need adequate and advanced preparation and professional development that is intentionally focused on the fully online learning environment. Parents and students need to have an understanding of the expectations of active engagement in the fully online learning environment. Consistent and clear communication about expectations of learners is a predominant factor in ensuring increased student achievement in the K-12 public school fully online learning environment.

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