• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 127
  • 49
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 193
  • 193
  • 58
  • 53
  • 48
  • 44
  • 29
  • 26
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 20
  • 19
  • 19
  • 17
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Preliminary Investigation of Metadata Description Mechanisms for Materials Science

Bartolo, Laura, Lowe, C.S. January 2003 (has links)
Materials Digital Library, Kent State University / Materials Property Data Markup Language (MatML) provides detailed materials property information necessary for the exchange of materials science digital resources among users. Dublin Core (DC) provides a consistent generic characterization of content important for resource discovery. The feasibility of reusing detailed information provided by MatML to supply DC metadata is explored. Preliminary data gathered from three examples of materials science resources indicates that MatML tags may be successfully mapped to DC elements. A prototype webbased authoring tool designed to assist authors in generating MatML as well as to map MatML information to DC elements is discussed.
2

Analyzing the role of knowledge organization in scholarly communication: An inquiry into the intellectual foundation of knowledge organization

Andersen, Jack 03 1900 (has links)
In this dissertation I analyze the relationship between social organization and knowledge organization. This analysis is carried out on two levels. The first level consists of three chapters each examining particular perspectives of the relationship. First, in terms of an examination of how communication technologies have shaped forms of social organization. I argue how knowledge organization is constituted by social organization. Second, I further situate knowledge organization in light of Jurgen Habermas theory of the public sphere and argue that his theory can be viewed as a fundamental model of knowledge organization. Third, by drawing on various theories of genre and activity systems, I underpin the connection between social organization in scholarly communication by means of how indexing reflects and responds to the rhetorical activities of scholarly articles. I consider this as how knowledge organization can ascribe cognitive authority to documents. The texts are considered to constitute the mediating link between social organization and knowledge organization. I conclude that this relationship between social organization and knowledge organization must be understood and examined in order to fully account for the role knowledge organization in human activities based on document production and use such as scholarly communication.
3

Approaches to Knowledge Organization (KO). Lecture given at the University of Rome. April 20, 2007

Hjørland, Birger 04 1900 (has links)
Presentations and discussions of different approaches to Knowledge Organization from Melvil Dewey to Internet enginees: 1. â Traditional approachesâ 2. Management oriented approaches 3. Logical and facet-analytic approaches 4. Computer based approaches 5. Bibliometric approaches 6. User oriented and cognitive approaches 7. Domain analytic approaches
4

Deliberate bias in Knowledge Organization? Advances in Knowledge Organization, vol. 11, 2008, pp. 256-261.

Hjørland, Birger January 2008 (has links)
"Bias" is normally understood as a negatively loaded word, as something to be avoided or minimized, for example, in statistics or in knowledge organization. Recently Melanie Feinberg suggested, however, that "if we cannot eliminate bias, then we should instead attempt to be more responsible about it and explicitly decide on and defend the perspectives represented in information systems". This view is linked to related views: That knowledge organization is too much concerned with information retrieval and too much described in the mode of scientific discovery, as opposed to the mode of artifact design: "From the literary warrant of Hulme to the terminological warrant of the Classification Research Group (CRG), to Hjørland’s domain analysis, the classificationist seems like one who documents and compiles, and not one who actively shapes design." This paper examines these claims, which may be understood as questions about subjectivity and objectivity in classification and about positivism versus pragmatism in research. Is KO an objective and neutral activity? Can it be? Should it be? A dominant view has been that knowledge and KO should be understood as a passive reflection of an external order. This has been termed the mirror metaphor of knowledge and is related to empiricism and positivism. The opposite view - which is in accordance with both Feinberg and Hjørland - states that knowledge organization should be functional and thus reflecting given goals, purposes and values. It is related to pragmatism in philosophy.
5

Book review of: Wallerstein, I. et al. (1996). Open the Social Sciences, report of the Gulbenkian Commission on the Restructuring of the Social Sciences. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press

Hjørland, Birger January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
6

Semantics and Knowledge Organization

Hjørland, Birger 01 1900 (has links)
Contents: Introduction: The importance of semantics for information science (IS) The status of semantic research in information science. Semantics and the philosophy of science. Semantics and subject knowledge Semantics and its â warrantâ a) Query/situation specific or idiosyncratic b) Universal, Platonic entities/relations c) â Deep semanticsâ common to all languages (or inherent in cognitive structures) d) Specific to specific empirical languages (e.g. Swedish) e) Domain or discourse specific f) Other (e.g. determined by a company or by a workgroup, â user orientedâ ) Semantic relations The 'intellectual' versus the social organization of knowledge Conclusion
7

Animal Biotechnology Knowledge Resources on the Internet: A Study

January 2007 (has links)
Very useful for those looking for biotechnology related digital resources available online. / Information is a dynamic and inexhaustible source that affects all disciplines and Animal Biotechnology is no exception. The application of scientific and engineering principles to the processing and production of materials by animals or aquatic species to provide goods and services, has yielded new and improved medicines for animals that help lower production costs and improve animal well being by fighting various diseases caused by bacteria and parasites. New and enhanced animal vaccines have also been developed through modern animal biotechnology techniques. For all these things, Animal biotechnologists require latest, authenticated and scholarly information. In this regard, the exponential growth of the Internet expands the wealth of knowledge resources available in all disciplines including animal biotechnology and the amount of biotechnology knowledge available on the web is staggering. The Internet connects them to organizations such as universities, colleges, research institutes and companies who are dealing with animal biotechnology and facilitates access to informal organizations such as special interest groups, email lists, news groups, blogs, etc. Databases such as Entrez Nucleotides, GenBank, RefSeq, CCDSD, TPAD, dbEST, dbGSS, dbMHC, dbSNP, dbSTS, UniVec, CDD, Entrez Proteins, MMDB, 3DDD are made available by NCBI across the cyberspace which facilitates 24/7 access to all those concerned with animal biotechnology. Gateway sites like AgBiotechNet, APHIS of USDA, ISB of Virginia Tech University opens the door of online documents and searchable databases pertaining to the development, testing and regulatory review of genetically modified plants, animals and other microorganisms. A number of factual databases, electronic journals, electronic books and other electronic documents are freely available across the Internet. It connects students, research scholars, academics, librarians, scientists and other category of professionals dealing with animal biotechnology. The opportunities provided by the Internet for interactive learning, up-to-date science news, scholarly contents, project funding guidance, audio-visual contents in the area of biotechnology are laudable.
8

Data Models for Knowledge Organization Tools: Evolution and Perspectives

January 2002 (has links)
This paper focuses on the need for knowledge organization (KO) tools, such as library classifications, thesauri and subject heading systems, to be fully disclosed and available in the open network environment. The authors look at the place and value of traditional library knowledge organization tools in relation to the technical environment and expectations of the Semantic Web. Future requirements in this context are explored, stressing the need for KO systems to support semantic interoperability. In order to be fully shareable KO tools need to be reframed and reshaped in terms of conceptual and data models. The authors suggest that some useful approaches to this already exist in methodological and technical developments within the fields of ontology modelling and lexicographic and terminological data interchange.
9

Data Models for Knowledge Organization Tools: Evolution and Perspectives

Cordeiro, Maria Inês, Slavic, Aida January 2002 (has links)
This paper focuses on the need for knowledge organization (KO) tools, such as library classifications, thesauri and subject heading systems, to be fully disclosed and available in the open network environment. The authors look at the place and value of traditional library knowledge organization tools in relation to the technical environment and expectations of the Semantic Web. Future requirements in this context are explored, stressing the need for KO systems to support semantic interoperability. In order to be fully shareable KO tools need to be reframed and reshaped in terms of conceptual and data models. The authors suggest that some useful approaches to this already exist in methodological and technical developments within the fields of ontology modelling and lexicographic and terminological data interchange.
10

A Rejoinder to Beghtol (2004). Knowledge Organization, 31(3), 199-201.

Nicolaisen, Jeppe, Hjørland, Birger January 2004 (has links)
In our comment (Hjørland & Nicolaisen, 2004) to Beghtol (2003) we were reacting to the fact that Beghtol describes the classifications developed by scholars as â naïveâ while she describes the classifications developed by librarians and information scientists as â professionalâ . We explained that we feared this unfortunate terminology is rooted in misjudgments about the relationships between scientific and scholarly classification on the one hand and LIS classifications on the other. We stated that only a correction of this misjudgment might give us in the field of KO a chance to do a job that is not totally disrespected and disregarded by the rest of the intellectual world. Beghtol (2004), in her reply to us, claims that the term â naïveâ as she defines it, is not a pejorative term. But she fails to explain why. This paper examines and responds to the views put forwards in Beghtol (2004).

Page generated in 0.1134 seconds