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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Le pouvoir des commissions scolaires en matière de renvoi et son contrôle par le tribunal d'arbitrage

Boisrond, Yves January 1975 (has links)
Abstract not available.
2

Through literature to jurisprudence

Culham, T.A January 1943 (has links)
Abstract not available.
3

Trends in the constitutional decisions of the Supreme Court of Canada in determining the division of legislative powers in the British North America Act, 1867

Armstrong, Arnold D January 1954 (has links)
The purpose of this thesis is to determine the trands in the constitutional decisions of the Sepreme Court of Canada and to try to assess the extent to which the influence of the Judicial Committee has swayed these trends. As well, it is an attempt to throw some light upon the probable outcome of future decisions.
4

The Defence factor in Confederation of the British North American provinces

Gatner, A. Joseph January 1961 (has links)
Abstract not available.
5

Indigenous peoples and the right to culture : an international law analysis

Afadameh-Adeyemi, Ashimizo January 2009 (has links)
Includes bibliographical references. / In the post or neo-colonial era, the question of fair and equitable treatment of indigenous peoples remains a subject of international political and legal discourse. Efforts have been made to study ways of promoting and protecting indigenous rights and to develop international norms for the protection of these rights. These efforts have sprung forth a plethora of questions; these questions include 'who qualifies as indigenous peoples?' and 'what rights do they enjoy under international law.' This thesis takes a cursory look at the conceptual underpinnings of indigenous peoples and specifically evaluates their right to culture in the parlance of international law.
6

Regulating domestic work : international and comparative perspectives in South Africa, Namibia and Indonesia

Afadameh, Amanoshokunu January 2013 (has links)
Includes bibliographical references. / This dissertation evaluates the regulation of domestic work. It approaches this topicfrom an international and national perspective. An international perspective in thiscontext means the regulation of domestic work as an international labour standard bythe International Labour Organization (ILO). Its national perspective entails the variousmodels of national regulation in three countries- South Africa Namibia and Indonesia.This dissertation also brings to the fore the nature of domestic work in its evaluation as a labour standard. It does this to give a general understanding of the subject. In recent years, regulating domestic work has been a popular topic within international labour law circles. However, the popularity of this discussion is not reflected in the working lives of a majority of domestic workers worldwide. Therefore, this dissertation reiterates specific issues that affect the lives of domestic workers in a bid to contribute to the body of knowledge on the subject; and the achievement of social justice and decent work in this “invisible' sector.This dissertation concludes that the proper regulation of the domestic work sector is the first step in the achievement of social justice for domestic workers. It also posits after a comparative analysis that the regulation of decent work requires a framework in which hard and soft law approaches are interwoven in the regulation of domestic work. This framework is important as the intertwining of hard and soft law regimes will enable the reaffirmation of and compliance with ILO standards for domestic work regulation. National legislation of ILO member states also have to be fine-tuned or amended to this dissertation reiterates specific issues that affect the lives of domestic workers in a bid to contribute to the body of knowledge on the subject; and the achievement of social justice and decent work in this 'invisible' sector. This dissertation concludes that the proper regulation of the domestic worksector is the first step in the achievement of social justice for domestic workers. It also posits after a comparative analysis that the regulation of decent work requires a framework in which hard and soft law approaches are interwoven in the regulation of domestic work. This framework is important as the intertwining of hard and soft law regimes will enable the reaffirmation of and compliance with ILO standards for domestic work regulation.
7

Solomon's Judgment: Baby M and the Struggle to Define Motherhood and Morality in Modern America

Vernon, Jeffrey T 15 October 2015 (has links)
No description available.
8

Zhabdrung's legacy : state transformation, law and social values in contemporary Bhutan

Whitecross, Richard William January 2002 (has links)
Based on ethnographic research in Bhutan and among Bhutanese living in Nepal, this thesis examines the reach of law in everyday life in contemporary Bhutan. Drawing on inter-linked themes of social values drawn from Buddhist teachings and the importance of morality, power and legitimacy, I examine popular discourse of and about law. It contributes to current arguments in socio-legal studies and anthropology concerning the reach of law in contemporary societies and its significance in everyday life. Furthermore, my thesis represents the first ethnographic account of law and society in Bhutan. It makes a valuable contribution not only to our understanding of Bhutan, but also provides an ideal opportunity to examine everyday conceptions of law as the Bhutanese State promotes legal change that draw on non-indigenous models. The thesis considers the impact of the creation of a modem, independent judiciary and recent changes in legal education and the increasing amount of legislation and secondary regulations. However, the everyday construction of law, as well as the meanings and uses to which law are put, raises problems. Therefore, I turn to examine how ordinary people create and develop a sense of the law by focussing on the development of legal consciousness. To do this, I look less at the formal legal processes of the law than at the narratives about law from a number of Bhutanese. These narratives focus on the importance of community values and notions of morality and legitimacy, which simultaneously draw on a prevalent authoritative public discourse concerning social behaviour and individual re-interpretations and resistance within the broad framework of the discourse. I examine the interrelationship between these various features, which evoke, on an individual level, a sense of "legal consciousness" and I develop how this informs daily life. This interrelationship highlights the dynamism of the process and the fluidity of ideas and adaptability to changing needs and relationships of power. This approach allows for an examination of law situated within, rather than separate from, everyday life in order to analyse the fragmentary and often inconsistent use made by individuals of the legal orders and forums available to them.
9

From Retribution to Reintegration: Drug Courts in Australia

Cappa, Clare Unknown Date (has links)
Drug courts are a recent, but apparently compelling, addition to the criminal justice system, designed to positively influence the drug-crime nexus. They operate as a specialised criminal court, involving cooperation between the courts and drug treatment professionals, by streamlining drug-related cases away from traditional processing and punishment into an intensive drug treatment program. The very proliferation of drug courts renders them deserving of study. While there are surveys of individual Australian courts, there has, to date, been no comparative study across the various Australian jurisdictions. This thesis fulfils this need. Although there is increasing debate in the United States about the theoretical basis of drug courts, this debate is largely taking place after their creation. Australian drug courts have largely been implemented without reference to any philosophical underpinnings. This thesis places the drug court phenomenon within its political, social, and philosophical environment, and provides an explanation of the legal contexts within which the drug court process operates. There are many untested assumptions about drug courts, most importantly claims that they are successful. If drug courts are going to continue to operate and become more widely accepted, it is necessary to recognise their underlying rationale and to identify the link between the social, political, and theoretical bases and the actual outcomes. The indicia for success within the drug court context have never been definitively articulated, and by identifying key elements of success, and then categorising the relationships of those elements to contexts and processes, this thesis will go some of the way towards defining drug court success. In other words this thesis attempts to provide answers to the questions – do drug courts work? And if so, what makes them workable?
10

The twilight of legal subjectivity : towards a deconstructive republican theory of law

Van der Walt, Johan Willem Gous 12 August 2015 (has links)
LL.D. / Please refer to full text to view abstract

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