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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Preferences of consumers age 50+ for typography of product instruction labels

Metz, Marilyn. January 1996 (has links)
Fifty well-educated consumers over 50 years of age selected print variables within the safety zone for optimal print presentation. A Typography Variable Score (TVScore) matrix based on deviations from optimal print was developed in order to provide a means of assessing consumer product instruction labels. There was a significant correlation between the TVScore and participants' ratings of ease of reading and attractiveness of 40 product instruction labels presented. A modified Miscue Analysis procedure was developed and used to assess the influence of typography on the ease of reading of labels with different typography and TVScores. Participants who read the label with most deviations from optimal print, and therefore the highest TVScore, made significantly more reading miscues. Typography of product instruction labels is an important feature for ease of reading. The Typography Variable Score provides a reliable means of predicting ease of reading for well-educated consumers over 50 years of age.
2

Preferences of consumers age 50+ for typography of product instruction labels

Metz, Marilyn. January 1996 (has links)
No description available.
3

Type obscurance : a comparison of two areal dot patterns

Nelson, Susan L. January 1983 (has links)
Just as coarse static on a radio station interferes with a listener's ability to discern the music being played, so do coarse visual background patterns interfere with a map reader's ability to read words on a map. This problem is especially prevalent when small budgets limit the cartographer to the use of commercially available, pre-printed areal patterns for black and white reproduction. This study investigates the effects of dot arrangement and dot density of two purchased, areal dot patterns, type size, type orientation, and letter case on word reading accuracy when words and dot patterns are viewed simultaneously. The emphasis of the study was on dot arrangement, comparing the readability of words presented with a controlled "geometric" dot arrangement and then with an experimental "scallop" dot arrangement. The remaining variables, included to simulate an actual map situation, were also analyzed. The primary null hypothesis, that dot arrangement does not make a significant differance in word reading accuracy regardless of dot density, type size, type orientation, and letter case, was rejected on the basis of the analysis results.
4

Effect of display and text parameters on reading performance

Subbaram, Venkiteshwar Manoj. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2004. / Document formatted into pages; contains 275 p. Includes bibliographical references. Abstract available online via OhioLINK's ETD Center; full text release delayed at author's request until 2005 July 12.
5

Type variation and the problem of cartographic type legibility

Bartz, Barbara Sue, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1969. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
6

A study of the discernibility of electrophotostatic copied typefaces as compared with non-electrophotostatic copied typefaces /

Melchionne, Laura A. January 1987 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Rochester Institute of Technology, 1987. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 67-70).
7

Legibility how precedents established in print impact on-screen and dynamic typography /

Specht, Heidi. January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (M.F.A.)--West Virginia University, 2000. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains iv, 25 p. : ill. (some col.) Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 23-25).
8

Adapting Hvistendahl's and Kahl's typographic legibility study to the World Wide Web

Gosse, Ross January 1999 (has links)
In 1975, J.K. Hvistendahl and Mary R. Kahl tested 200 individuals to determine if readers preferred serif type for the body text of stories in newspapers. Subjects read stories set in serif and sans serif type. They were timed and asked for their preference as to which typeface they felt was more legible. The researchers found that test subjects preferred serif type the body text in their newsprint. After comparing the time it took subjects to read stories, researchers found readers needed less time to read stories set in serif type than sans serif.Almost 25 years later, another generation of readers has emerged, and Web pages are commonplace among many newspapers today. Yet nothing has been done to determine if these same findings are true for the World Wide Web. This study set out to do just that.Two hundred subjects were recruited for this study, each one placed into one of four groups: male student, male non-student, female student, and female non-student. Each subject was asked to read two 325-word stories, each on its own World Wide Web page. One story was set in a serif typeface, the other set in a sans serif typeface. Subjects were unobrusively timed with a stopwatch as they read each story. After reading the two stories, they were asked which typeface they felt was more legible, serif or sans serif.Overall, readers showd no statistically significant preference for serif or sans serif type in body text on the World Wide Web. The data was tested with ANOVA while frequencies and were also gathered. Only one statistically significant interaction surfaced which found that male students, who preferred sans serif type, took a statistically significant longer time to read online stories set in serif type. / Department of Journalism
9

The legibility of text on paper and laptop computer a multivariable approach /

Stone, Deborah. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Maryland at College Park, 1997. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
10

An investigation of the affects of typefaces upon reader's perception of the meanings of messages using the semantic differential testing technique /

Hofman, Veronica M. January 1988 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Rochester Institute of Technology, 1988. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 74-76).

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