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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A strategic focus on the implementation of the National Liquor Act 59 of 2003 in South Africa

Manamela, Matsidinkane Solomon 23 July 2019 (has links)
The aim of this study is to determine a strategic focus for the implementation of the National Liquor Act 59 of 2003 in South Africa. There are several shortcomings in the implementation of the Act at national and provincial level. Various models in the field of Human Resource Management can assist in creating an effective strategy to achieve National Liquor Authority (NLA), Provincial Liquor Board (PLB) and South Africa Police Service (SAPS) objectives. The researcher applied purposive and snowball sampling to select 21 participants with extensive knowledge of the implementation of national and provincial liquor acts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from police and non-police liquor inspectors involved in the implementation of the Act. National and international literature was studied to collect theoretical information. The data was analysed by means of qualitative data packages. The ATLAS.ti software program was used to categorise data according to themes. The study objectives were to understand the strategic focus behind the implementation of national and provincial liquor acts. Furthermore, the roles of liquor inspectors and the procedure according to which the liquor acts were communicated to ensure performance were examined. International best practices in the enforcement of liquor acts were explored, and a strategic model was proposed to supplement shortcomings in the enforcement of these legislations. The findings indicated a gap between the National Liquor Act 59 of 2003 and agencies’ strategic focus, a lack of capacity, and poor communication of the liquor acts. Moreover, a strategic model is suggested to ensure uniform standards for the implementation of the National Liquor Act 59 of 2003. / Maikemišetšo a nyakišišo ye ke go laetša nepišo ya leano la phethagatšo ya Molao wa Bosetšhaba wa Bjala, 59 wa 2003 ka Afrika Borwa. Go ba gona ga ditlhaelelo tše mmalwa phethagatšong ya molao maemong a bosetšhaba le a profense. Dimmotlolo tša go fapana ka lekaleng la Bolaodi bja Methopo ya Batho e ka thuša tlholong ya leano le le botse go fihlelela maikemišetšo a Bolaodi bja Bosetšhaba bja Bjala (NLA), Boto ya Profense ya Bjala (PLB) le Tirelo ya Sephodisa ya Afrika Borwa (SAPS). Banyakišiši ba šomišitše sampole ya nepo le ye e oketšegilego go kgetha bakgathatema ba 21 ba go ba le tsebo ye e nabilego ya phethagatšo ya melao ya bjala ya bosetšhaba le ya profense. Dipoledišano tša sebopego sa seripa di dirilwe go kgoboketša datha ya go tšwa go bahlahlobi ba sephodisa le bao e sego ba sephodisa ba ba akaretšwago phethagatšong ya molao. Dingwalo tša bosetšhaba le tša boditšhabatšhaba di fetlekilwe go kgoboketša tshedimošo ya teori. Datha e sekasekilwe ka go šomiša dipakhetše tša datha tša khwalithethifi. Lenaneo la softewere ya ATLAS.ti le šomišitšwe go aroganya datha go ya ka ditabataba. Maikemišetšo a nyakišišo e be e le go kwešiša nepišo ya leano la phethagatšo ya melao ya bjala ya bosetšhaba le ya profense. Gape, mešomo ya bahlahlobi ba bjala le tshepedišo yeo go ya ka yona melao ya bjala e tsebagaditšwego go kgonthišiša gore mošomo o hlahlobilwe. Mekgwa ye mekaone ya boditšhabatšhaba tiragatšong ya melao ya bjala e utulotšwe, gomme mmotlolo wa leano o šišintšwe go tlaleletša ditlhaelelo tiragatšong ya melao ye. Dikutullo di laeditše sekgoba gare ga Molao wa Bosetšhaba wa Bjala, 59 wa 2003 le nepišo ya leano ya dietšentshi, tlhokego ya bokgoni, le kgokagano ya go fokola ya melao ya bjala. Go feta fao, mmotlolo WA leano o a šišinywa go kgonthišiša ditekanetšo tša go swana tša phethagatšo ya Molao wa Bosetšhaba wa Bjala, 59 wa 2003. / Maikaelelo a thutopatlisiso eno ke go swetsa ka phitlhelelo ya togamaano e e totiwang malebana le go diragadiwa ga Molao wa Bosetšhaba wa Nnotagi wa bo59 wa 2003 mo Aforikaborwa. Go na le makoanyana mo tiragatsong ya Molao kwa magatong a bosetšhaba le a diporofense. Dikao tse di farologaneng mo lephateng la Botsamaisi jwa Badiri di ka thusa go tlhama togamaano e e nonofileng go fitlhelela maitlhomo a Bothati jwa Bosetšhaba jwa Nnotagi (NLA), Boto ya Porofense ya Nnotagi (PLB) le Tirelo ya Sepodisi sa Aforikaborwa. Mmatlisisi o dirisitse tsela ya go tlhopha sampole go ya ka maikaelelo a thutopatlisiso mmogo le go letla ba ba mo patlisisong go ngokela ba bangwe go nna karolo ya sampole go tlhopha bannileseabe ba le 21 ba ba nang le kitso e e tseneletseng ya tiragatso ya melao ya bosetšhaba le ya porofense ya nnotagi. Go dirisitswe dipotsolotso tse di batlileng di rulagana go kokoanya tshedimosetso go tswa kwa sepodising le kwa batlhatlhobing ba e seng ba sepodisi ba nnotagi ba ba nang le seabe mo tiragatsong ya Molao. Go buisitswe dikwalo tsa bosetšhaba le tsa boditšhabatšhaba go kokoanya tshedimosetso ya tiori. Tshedimosetso e ne ya sekasekwa ka tiriso ya dipakana tse di dirisang dipalopalo. Go dirisitswe porokeramo ya serweboleta sa ATLAS.ti go aroganya tshedimosetso go ya ka meono. Maitlhomo a thutopatlisiso e ne e le go tlhaloganya togamaano e e totilweng malebana le tiragatso ya melao ya bosetšhaba le ya porofense ya nnotagi. Mo godimo ga moo, go sekasekilwe seabe sa batlhatlhobi ba nnotagi le ditsamaiso tse go anamisiwang tshedimosetso ka ga melao ya nnotagi ka tsona go netefatsa tiragatso. Go ne ga lebelelwa ditiragatso tse di gaisang tsa boditšhabatšhaba mo tiragatsong ya melao ya nnotagi mme go tshitshintswe sekao sa togamaano go tshegetsa makoa mo tiragatsong ya melao eno. Diphitlhelelo di supile sekgala magareng ga Molao wa Bosetšhaba wa Nnotagi wa bo59 wa 2003 le diphitlhelelo tse di totilweng tsa togamaano tsa ditheo, tlhaelo ya bokgoni le tlhaeletsano e e bokoa malebana le melao ya nnotagi. Gape go tshitshinngwa sekao sa togamaano go netefatsa gore go nna le sekano se se tshwanang sa tiragatso ya Molao wa Bosetšhaba wa Nnotagi wa bo59 wa 2003. / Police Practice / D. Lit. et Phil. (Police Science)
2

Smokkel for the pot : the politics of liquor retail in the Western Cape, a case study of Atlantis

Peters, Nicolette Chandre’ January 2016 (has links)
Magister Administrationis - MAdmin / The Western Cape Liquor Act of 2008 was implemented to decrease the amount of shebeens operating in South Africa’s residential areas. This action was taken in order to reduce liquor harm which has been widely reported on by health professionals. However shebeens serve as a livelihood source for poor South Africans. Thus a possible tension could exist since shebeen owners and communities might become disgruntled with politicians, political parties and government for implementing a law which threatens livelihoods. This thesis paper examines the political perceptions of the people of Atlantis towards political parties in light of the implementation of the Western Cape Liquor Act of 2008. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with key role players residing in Atlantis, and focus groups were also held with shebeen owners. This was done in order to determine the community’s attitude towards shebeens, liquor, politicians, political parties, government and the Liquor Act. Respondents reported that the community remains underdeveloped and that their views are ignored by politicians and other public officials. Shebeens are viewed as a necessary evil since there is a stigma attached to selling liquor and many respondents believe that liquor abuse is the cause of many socio economic problems facing Atlantis. However there are no other viable job opportunities in the area forcing shebeen proprietors and the community to accept shebeens. Interestingly this thesis also shows that both the key role players and shebeen owners have a similar attitude towards shebeens and politicians; as both groups have adopted an ambivalent attitude towards shebeens and politicians. Bayat (2000) Chatterjee’s (2004) writings will be used to show that informality has become the only viable option in Atlantis. This is because the state has not been able to provide alternative employment in the area. The residents therefore now break the law in order to survive. Moreover politics and politicians are disliked but residents still partake in politics .There is therefore an ambivalence towards both politics and shebeens in the area. In conclusion the people of Atlantis feel marginalized and oppressed by those who wield political power. The Western Cape Liquor Act however, has not had a dramatic impact as will be shown when comparing Bayat’s (2000) quiet encroachment of the ordinary theory to the case.
3

A Criminological study of non-compliance with selected licensing conditions of tavens

Lekgau, Khomotso January 2015 (has links)
Thesis (M. A. (Criminology)) -- University of Limpopo, 2015 / The study was aimed at analysing the non-compliance of tavern operators with selected licensing conditions of taverns in Mankweng Area, Limpopo Province. Tavern operators were randomly sampled for the study. A quantitative research approach was used and questionnaires were administered for data collection. The findings revealed that tavern operators do not comply with the licensing conditions as stipulated in the Liquor Act, no 27 of 1989. The most contravened conditions include trading beyond stipulated times and allowing minors into the licensed premises. However, there is a need to study the perceptions of the tavern operators with regard to the licensing conditions of taverns. The researcher recommended that the community should co-operate with the Liquor Board in the effective prevention of the non-compliance of the tavern operators.
4

An investigation into the effect of race and politics on the development of South African Sport (1970-1919)

Anderson, Paul Gerard January 1979 (has links)
Philosophiae Doctor - PhD / There is confusion in literature concerning the early beginnings of sport in South Africa. Indications are that it was informal in nature and only took on organised form with the arrival of the British in 1795. Black spoLt similarly had obscure beginning, the dearth of literature in this respect being even more pronounced. There were occasional instances of Whites and Blacks playing together, but this was not a typical characteristic of early South African sport. South Africa's Black people developed their own sports teams and played mainly amongst their own race groups. This was a result of the prevailing class consciousness of the British, which excluded all except the most talented Boers from British clubs, and the incompatibility the Boer felt with the Black people. The result was development of 'racial' clubs that tended to cater exclusively for one particular group, with some sports clubs using religion as a means of demarcation. While there tended to be a racial exclusiveness about the early clubs, informal inter-racial contact was present. This tended to disappear when the belief was encouraged through legislation that the Black people were to develop as a separate nation. The introduction of an official colour bar in the Mines and Amendment Act of 1911 began the crystalisation of this idea. White sports clubs in South Africa had in some cases become founder members of international sports associations, and because these associations recognised only one organisation per country, Black sportsmen were denied access to international competition. By tho 1930s racial demarcation had fully permeated South African sport, effectively denying the Black sportsmen equal opportunity and equal facilities. Reaction by Black sportsmen led to, several non-racial spcrts organisations being Founded in South Africa. Already in 1946 a request for affiliation was made to the British Amateur Weightlifters by the Non-White South African Association, but this was turned down. This demarcation was· carried further with the election to power in 1948 of a Nationalist government which brought with it an apartheid ideology that manifested itself indirectly in sport through legislation such as the Group ·Areas Act, the Black Urban Areas Consolidation Act and the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act. In the fifties the dissatisfaction of Non-White sports organisations with sports oppression increased in intensity, and in 1958 a non-racial South African Sports Association was formed to further the interests of the non-racial sportsmen. There was considerable opposition from White sports organisations and the government. In 1963 the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee was formed to further the Olympic aspirations of South African sportsmen. exile in London in 1965. This organisation went into self Operating from this base, it set about creating a worldwide awareness of the plight of the Non- White sportsman in South Africa, co-ordinating and organising prot~st movements against South African teams and persuading sports associations and governments not to have sporting contact with South Africa.

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