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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Romantic and a Samurai: A Comparative Look at Mortality and Society According to Miyamoto Musashi and John Keats

Cerone, Christopher Alan 2011 (has links)
No description available.
2

A GRIOT’S YARN

Daniel Latson, Trudie I. 15 July 2011 (has links)
No description available.
3

Creator Unknown

Rich, Coralmarie Louise 26 May 2011 (has links)
No description available.
4

The Scenery

Cummiskey, Robert 4 December 2008 (has links)
No description available.
5

Conviction

Panzner, Jessica 11 December 2008 (has links)
No description available.
6

The Undergrads

Hebebrand, Matthew John 23 April 2009 (has links)
No description available.
7

Verbal Cues, Visual Clues: Expressions of Women and Medicine in Early Modern Paintings and Drama

Steinway, Elizabeth V. 4 May 2011 (has links)
No description available.
8

"I AM FIRST AN ADOPTEE”: HAPPINESS, RACIAL MELANCHOLIA, AND TRANSNATIONALITY IN ASIAN TRANSNATIONAL ADOPTION

Sharma, Natasha 30 March 2015 (has links)
No description available.
9

Lottie and the Mirror Monsters

Albares, Brigitta 9 June 2015 (has links)
No description available.
10

Reinvention in the Line of Death: A Reconsideration of Geoffrey Hill's Commemorative Verse

Bartch, Michael Christopher 1 June 2009 (has links)
This paper considers the embodied ethics of Geoffrey Hills poetic practice. Hill stages his engagement with poetry through the idioms, images, tropes, and diction of the literary tradition. Through this pragmatic rehearsal of the language of the dead, Hills poetry projects the tradition into the present. Hill resists the ethical entrapments of appropriative poetry through his insistence upon the brute physicality of atrocity and through a rigorous (for both poet and reader) formal difficulty. Hills practice refuses to console after the models of Peter Sacks, Jahan Ramazani, or John Vickery. Instead, concerned with modernitys disconnectedness, Hills poetry returns us to the presence of the dead, to their ritual and language. Alternatively, because Hills subjects are historical atrocities, rather than natural occurrences, the sort of communal consolation that the elegy traditionally offered would be inappropriate to Hills concerns. These atrocities are, most frequently, instances of human violence (the Holocaust, the Battle of Towton, the Wars of the Roses, etc.) and, for this reason, they do not lend themselves to the consolations of natural cycles of death and rebirth. Since they were often committed in the name of religion, Christian transcendence is similarly questionable, as are other consolatory transcendences. These conventional modes of consolation being denied, Hills poetry reconnects us with the dead through the formal devices and techniques of the historical institution of poetry. Through the rigorous engagement with and sacrificial making of poetry, Hill attempts to redeem tradition and history for the present.

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