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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Thermal conductivity of bonded hollow-sphere monoliths

Ford, Theodore Robert 08 1900 (has links)
No description available.
12

The pressure-volume-temperature behavior of amorphous high polymers and oligomers

Barlow, Joel William, January 1970 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1970. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
13

Deformation theory of hot-pressing

Kakar, Ashok Kumar January 1967 (has links)
The possible deformation behaviour of spheres in a compact has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. The change in contact area radius 'a' relative to the particle radius R has been related to the bulk density and bulk strain for four possible modes of packing: simple cubic (Z = 6), orthorhombic (Z = 8), rhombohedral (Z = 12), and body-centered cubic (Z = 8). An equation relating the above parameters can be represented by D — D。= [formula omitted] D。(a/R)² for different types of packings, D and D。 being the densities at any a/R and at a/R = 0, respectively. It has been shown experimentally by deforming monosized lead spheres at room temperature, 50 and 100°C in a cylindrical die, that the overall deformation is similar to that of the orthorhombically packed spheres. A change in the coordination number Z during the deformation process was also observed and may partially account for the deviation from the theoretically predicted values. Similar experiments using sapphire and K-Monel spheres were also carried out in the temperature range 1570 - 1700°C and 800 - 1000°C respectively. The results showed that the deformation behaviour was very similar to that of the lead spheres. A study of the geometry of deformation revealed that most of the spheres deformed in a random manner, although individual colonies of orthorhombic, tetragonal and rhombohedral packings were observed. It was also observed that the deformed faces that were approximately perpendicular to the direction of pressing were about 2.2 times larger than those parallel to the direction of pressing. This observation has been subsequently used to modify the theoretical models. The particle rearrangement and plastic flow have been found to be the predominant mechanisms for the densification of lead, K-Monel, and sapphire spheres under the experimental conditions used in this investigation. The criterion for yielding of two hemispheres of the same material in contact was used to incorporate the yield strength in the basic density equation. This equation has been found to fit the data obtained during the hot-pressing of the spheres. It has been observed that the deformation of sapphire single crystal spheres takes place by a complex deformation process. The presence of the basal and prismatic slip has been identified in the spheres deformed at 1570 and 1700°C. Presence of cross slip is also confirmed by the optical and electron micrographs at these temperatures. / Applied Science, Faculty of / Materials Engineering, Department of / Graduate
14

Thermal deformation of glass-crystal systems /

Thompson, David Fred. January 1968 (has links)
No description available.
15

Mechanisms of creep crack growth in a Cu-1 wt.% Sb alloy

Staley, James T. 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
16

High temperature fracture toughness of Cr-Mo-V welds

Bateman, Joseph A. 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
17

Wireless micromachined ceramic pressure sensors for high termperature environments

English, Jennifer M. 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
18

Life prediction models for high temperature fatigue based on microcrack propagation

Miller, Matthew P. 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
19

The decomposition of molybdenum disulphide in an induction plasma tailflame/

Munz, Richard J. (Richard Jürg) January 1974 (has links)
No description available.
20

Indentation creep and anisotropy in magnesium oxide and germanium

Everitt, Nicola Mary January 1990 (has links)
Hardness tests have the potential to provide a simple means of investigating the mechanical properties of materials, both at room temperature, and at higher temperatures. However, the information gained can not be fully utilized unless the deformation processes and variables are properly understood. Careful consideration of such deformation on single crystals can help to clarify the situation and lead to better understanding. This thesis describes indentation experiments on (001) MgO and Ge at temperatures up to 1175°C and 700°C respectively. Since anisotropy was one of the questions being addressed, the majority of the testing used Knoop indenters, although a few experiments used Vickers indenters. The work was carried out on a specially commissioned high temperature hardness tester (based on an original design by Wilberforce Scientific Developments). A main conclusion of the discussion on the design of high temperature hardness testers is the importance of independent heating of the indenter for accurate hardness results. The indentation behaviour of MgO was shown to include creep, even at room temperature for the Knoop <110> orientation. However a region of no indentation creep was exhibited between 750°C and 1050°C for both Vickers and Knoop indentations. This has not been reported in previous studies. The anisotropy displayed at room temperature between <110> and <100> Knoop decreased with increasing temperature, due to the faster creep rate of the < 110> orientation, and finally reversed. Knoop indentations in the <110> and <100> orientations on Ge also showed hardness anisotropy which changed with temperature. In this case there was no anisotropy at room temperature, but anisotropy developed as the temperature increased due to the faster creep rate of the <110> orientation. The indentation hardness response of both MgO and Ge is explained in terms of the interaction of dislocation arrays which are formed in the first few moments of the indentation. Measurement of the two diagonals of the Knoop indentations showed that the ratio of the diagonal lengths, and also the morphology of the surrounding material, can be used to examine the extent and direction of material displacement. Surface etching, and etching of sections, were used to analyse the disposition of slip around the indentations.

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