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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Social and technical issues of IP-based multi-modal semi-synchronous communication: rural telehealth communication in South Africa.

Vuza, Xolisa January 2005 (has links)
Most rural areas of developing countries are faced with problems like shortage of doctors in hospitals, illiteracy and poor power supply. Because of these issues, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is often sees as a useful solution for these areas. Unfortunately, the social environment is often ignored. This leads to inappropriate systems being developed for these areas. The aims of this thesis were firstly, to learn how a communication system can be built for a rural telehealth environment in a developing country, secondly to learn how users can be supported to use such a system.
2

The user-friendliness of a hospital information system using telemedicine in a traditional personnel culture at tertiary Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa.

Magaqa, Vuminkosi Lionel Longsdale. January 2010 (has links)
The research study assessed the user-friendliness of a hospital information system within a telemedicine context at Tertiary Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital (IALCH) in order to achieve the broad objective of developing a model for managing the implementation of these systems in the province. The current situation with the Hospital Information System implemented in IALCH is that doctors and nurses have difficulties in accessing the X-Ray images; ordering drugs, making patient notes, and accessing patient records at follow up sessions at a later date in the format they want. There are also problems with patient and staff confidentiality for some types of records. These problems raise the following questions: Have doctors adapted to change from traditional to computerised Hospital Information Systems implemented in IALCH? Have nurses adapted to this change and how user-friendly is the Hospital Information System at IALCH? The effectiveness and efficiency of the MEDICOM hospital information system and telemedicine system at IALCH for these groups in relation to their participation in the hospital information system and telemedicine system related activities was investigated using Geyser’s (1992) framework for a user-friendly information system and frameworks from Coiera, Westbrook and Wyatt (2006), Rigby (2006), and IMIA (2006). The population of the study were seven hundred and eighty six (786) doctors and one thousand eight hundred and sixteen (1816) nurses working at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital. Pertinent questions regarding the user-friendliness of the MEDICOM hospital information system and telemedicine system were addressed and answered. Based on surveys by questionnaire survey, focus group interviews and observation the factors that affect the user-friendliness of MEDICOM hospital information system and telemedicine system were identified. The survey data was evaluated and analysed manually. The study revealed that the nursing, pharmacy and billing modules of MEDICOM hospital information system were not user-friendly, but the system was reliable and always in operation when needed. The users could manipulate the logical operators of the system effectively, generally could control the system and handle errors. They were happy with the output of the hospital information system in terms of layout. However, the system provided technical support only and users wanted more training on the system. In summary, the study concludes that the Department of Health in KwaZulu-Natal should not roll-out the MEDICOM hospital information system to all hospitals in the province as yet. Since there is no single hospital information system or health information system in South Africa, it is therefore time to develop an eHealth Strategy for South Africa to enable a patient-centric focus to health care delivery across a networked model of care. Therefore, a single integrated and comprehensive hospital information system could be implemented in South Africa provided the issues raised for attention in the study are addressed. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2010.
3

Social and technical issues of IP-based multi-modal semi-synchronous communication: rural telehealth communication in South Africa.

Vuza, Xolisa January 2005 (has links)
Most rural areas of developing countries are faced with problems like shortage of doctors in hospitals, illiteracy and poor power supply. Because of these issues, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is often sees as a useful solution for these areas. Unfortunately, the social environment is often ignored. This leads to inappropriate systems being developed for these areas. The aims of this thesis were firstly, to learn how a communication system can be built for a rural telehealth environment in a developing country, secondly to learn how users can be supported to use such a system.
4

An investigation into the effect of power distance as a factor that facilitates the implementation of a computerized hospital information system

Lakay, Denise January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (MTech (Information Technology))--Peninsula Technikon, Cape Town, 2005 / The overall objective of this study is to identify the importance of culture in the implementation of Information systems and how output influences the success of a system. • The first objective is to assess the organizational culture in each hospital in terms of one of the dimensions of culture on Hofstede's checklist, namely power distance. • The second objective is to determine whether the speed with which a HIS was implemented was a success at the two academic hospitals in the Western Cape using the reduction of the level of backlog (paper based patient registration records) as a measure of implementation progress.
5

An investigation into the effect of power distance as a factor that facilitates the implementation of a computerized hospital information system

Lakay, Denise January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (MTech (Information Technology))--Peninsula Technikon, 2005. / This study was initiated to investigate whether power distance facilitates the successful implementation of a hospital information system. A comparative study was done to evaluate the effect of culture on the same information system (CLINICOM), implemented at the same time, but at different locations. The overall objective of this study was to identify the importance of culture in the implementation of In formation systems and how output influences the success of a system. • The first objective was to assess the organizational culture in each hospital in terms of one of the dimensions of culture on Hofstede's check Iist, namely power distance. • The second objective was to determine whether the speed with which a HIS was implemented was a success at the two academic hospitals in the Western Cape using the reduction of the level of backlog (paper based patient registration records) as a measure of implementation progress. The literature was reviewed on what determines the success of an information system. The effects of culture were studied and in particular power distance on the implementation of an information system and how this factor affected the backlog of information entries. Questionnaires were administered to the clerical staff at the hospitals, as they were the high users of the information system. The study showed that both institutions had a high power distance score, but the one institution had a Power distance Index (POI) that was considerable higher than the other. PDr relates to the concentration of authority. This finding suggests that the managers were more autocratic at the one hospital than at the other. The study found that the higher the PDI, the faster the backlog was reduced at implementation. Thus the higher the por the greater the concentration of authority;
6

The Validity of Health Claims on the World Wide Web: A Case Study of the Herbal Remedy Opuntia

Veronin, Michael A. 05 1900 (has links)
The World Wide Web has become a significant source of medical information for the public, but there is concern that much of the information is inaccurate, misleading, and unsupported by scientific evidence. This study analyzes the validity of health claims on the World Wide Web for the herbal Opuntia using an evidence-based approach, and supports the observation that individuals must critically assess health information in this relatively new medium of communication. A systematic search by means of nine search engines and online resources of Web sites relating to herbal remedies was conducted and specific sites providing information on the cactus herbal remedy from the genus Opuntia were retrieved. Validity of therapeutic health claims on the Web sites was checked by comparison with reports in the scientific literature subjected to two established quality assessment rating instruments. 184 Web sites from a variety of sources were retrieved and evaluated, and 98 distinct health claims were identified. 53 scientific reports were retrieved to validate claims. 25 involved human subjects, and 28 involved animal or laboratory models. Only 33 (34%) of the claims were addressed in the scientific literature. For 3% of the claims, evidence from the scientific reports was conflicting or contradictory. Of the scientific reports involving human subjects, none met the predefined criteria for high quality as determined by quality assessment rating instruments. Two-thirds of the claims were unsupported by scientific evidence and were based on folklore, or indirect evidence from related sources. Information on herbal remedies such as Opuntia is well represented on the World Wide Web. Health claims on Web sites were numerous and varied widely in subject matter. The determination of the validity of information about claims made for herbals on the Web would help individuals assess their value in medical treatment. However, the Web is conducive to dubious health information and individuals should exercise caution in accepting health claims unsupported by scientific evidence.
7

An Integrative Model of eHealth Communication: a Study of 18-30 Year Old College Students

Prybutok, Gayle 08 1900 (has links)
eHealth is commonly defined as health services and information provided through the Internet and related technologies. Health educators have taken advantage of Internet and social media venues to disseminate health information essential to health risk management, disease prevention, and disease management and did not have a validated theoretical model to explain their experiences. The goal of this study was to create and test an integrated model of eHealth communication specific to 18-30 year old college students based on five research questions that identified and confirmed the factors most highly correlated with the presentation of health information on Internet or social media venues that improve eHealth literacy and provoke eHealth behavioral intention among college students. A sample of over 1400 18-30 year old college students was surveyed about their general and health information related use of the Internet and social media. As a result of exploratory factor analysis and subsequent structural equation modeling, the proposed theoretical model was revised and tested for statistical power. Two revised integrative models of eHealth communication, one for Internet and one for social media, were developed and validated. The model for social media shows statistically significant paths throughout the model; however, the model for the Internet reveals that the path between two constructs and Online Health Behavior are not statistically significant and is worthy of further examination. This study has important practical implications for eHealth educators, organizations dedicated to informing the public about specific diseases or health promotion techniques, health practitioners seeking improved strategies for effective eHealth message design, and to health information professionals.
8

Computational Approaches for Analyzing Social Support in Online Health Communities

Khan Pour, Hamed 05 1900 (has links)
Online health communities (OHCs) have become a medium for patients to share their personal experiences and interact with peers on topics related to a disease, medication, side effects, and therapeutic processes. Many studies show that using OHCs regularly decreases mortality and improves patients mental health. As a result of their benefits, OHCs are a popular place for patients to refer to, especially patients with a severe disease, and to receive emotional and informational support. The main reasons for developing OHCs are to present valid and high-quality information and to understand the mechanism of social support in changing patients' mental health. Given the purpose of OHC moderators for developing OHCs applications and the purpose of patients for using OHCs, there is no facility, feature, or sub-application in OHCs to satisfy patient and moderator goals. OHCs are only equipped with a primary search engine that is a keyword-based search tool. In other words, if a patient wants to obtain information about a side-effect, he/she needs to browse many threads in the hope that he/she can find several related comments. In the same way, OHC moderators cannot browse all information which is exchanged among patients to validate their accuracy. Thus, it is critical for OHCs to be equipped with computational tools which are supported by several sophisticated computational models that provide moderators and patients with the collection of messages that they need for making decisions or predictions. We present multiple computational models to alleviate the problem of OHCs in providing specific types of messages in response to the specific moderator and patient needs. Specifically, we focused on proposing computational models for the following tasks: identifying emotional support, which presents OHCs moderators, psychologists, and sociologists with insightful views on the emotional states of individuals and groups, and identifying informational support, which provides patients with an efficient and effective tool for accessing the best-fit messages from a huge amount of patient posts to satisfy their information needs, as well as provides OHC moderators, health-practitioners, nurses, and doctors with an insightful view about the current discussion under the topics of side-effects and therapeutic processes, giving them an opportunity to monitor and validate the exchange of information in OHCs. We proposed hybrid models that combine high-level, abstract features extracted from convolutional neural networks with lexicon-based features and features extracted from long short-term memory networks to capture the semantics of the data. We show that our models, with and without lexicon-based features, outperform strong baselines.
9

Trust management of social network in health care

Chomphoosang, Pawat 12 November 2013 (has links)
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) / The reliability of information in health social network sites (HSNS) is an imperative concern since false information can cause tremendous damage to health consumers. In this thesis, we introduce a trust framework which captures both human trust level and its uncertainty, and also present advantages of using the trust framework to intensify the dependability of HSNS, namely filtering information, increasing the efficiency of pharmacy marketing, and modeling how to monitor reliability of health information. Several experiments which were conducted on real health social networks validate the applicability of the trust framework in the real scenarios.

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