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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

'N Generiese model vir 'n effektiewe mentorskapprogram

Marais, Susan Maria. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M. Com.(Human Resource Management))--University of Pretoria, 2000.
2

Characteristics ascribed to mentors by their proteges

Darwin, Ann 11 1900 (has links)
The benefit of mentoring as a strategy to improve workplace learning has been proclaimed in business and educational research literature for the past two decades. This study focused on the characteristics ascribed by proteges to their workplace mentors. This topic has received little serious attention despite the proliferation of research on mentoring. Data were collected from 1,771 Canadians, most of whom were from Vancouver, British Columbia. Initially, 1,011 people encountered in public places, such as markets and shopping centres, completed a pen-and-paper questionnaire in which they were asked to write three words to describe their mentors. One hundred of these words were put into a second questionnaire. This was administered to 760 people in various work settings and training venues. Data were factor analyzed resulting in eight factors: Authenticity, Volatility, Nurturance, Approachability, Competence, Inspiration, Conscientiousness and Hard Working. Standardized scale scores were then calculated from the factors and used to test for differences among various socio-demographic variables. Finally, individual, faceto- face interviews were conducted with 16 proteges in order to explore how these key mentoring characteristics manifested themselves in day-to-day work settings. Irrespective of age, gender or status within their organizations, two-thirds of the respondents reported having mentors. Mentors were most often older than their proteges and more than half reported that their mentors were also their bosses. Three-fifths of these mentors were men. Statistical tests of differences on various socio-demographic variables and the Dimensions Of Mentoring Inventory (DOMI) highlighted differences between the perceptions of women and men proteges about their mentors. Women proteges attributed higher Nurturance scores to mentors than did men, whereas men attributed higher Competence scores to mentors than did women. Most proteges were in single-gender relationships, however the 178 (one-fifth) of respondents in cross-gender relationships showed no differences in characteristics from single-gender relationships. Proteges in management positions attributed higher Competence scores to mentors than those in nonmanagement positions. Mentoring relationships with bosses were reportedly of longer duration, with more bosses aware of their mentoring role than non bosses. Mentor/protege conflict was infrequent, but when it occurred, the mentors were characterized as Volatile and Hard Working. Interviews with 16 proteges yielded vignettes of their mentors as they recounted memorable incidents. Five themes were uluminated through interviews with proteges. The mentors' belief in their protege's capabilities; a desire on the part of proteges to be mentored; timing of the relationship; reciprocity; and affinity. This was a study of mentor characteristics as seen from proteges' points of view. Further studies utilizing confirmatory factor analysis are needed to verify the factor structure of mentor characteristics and to test alternative models. Further investigation into characteristics of mentors, particularly those in the dual role of mentor and boss, and differences in perceptions between women and men are advisable.
3

Characteristics ascribed to mentors by their proteges

Darwin, Ann 11 1900 (has links)
The benefit of mentoring as a strategy to improve workplace learning has been proclaimed in business and educational research literature for the past two decades. This study focused on the characteristics ascribed by proteges to their workplace mentors. This topic has received little serious attention despite the proliferation of research on mentoring. Data were collected from 1,771 Canadians, most of whom were from Vancouver, British Columbia. Initially, 1,011 people encountered in public places, such as markets and shopping centres, completed a pen-and-paper questionnaire in which they were asked to write three words to describe their mentors. One hundred of these words were put into a second questionnaire. This was administered to 760 people in various work settings and training venues. Data were factor analyzed resulting in eight factors: Authenticity, Volatility, Nurturance, Approachability, Competence, Inspiration, Conscientiousness and Hard Working. Standardized scale scores were then calculated from the factors and used to test for differences among various socio-demographic variables. Finally, individual, faceto- face interviews were conducted with 16 proteges in order to explore how these key mentoring characteristics manifested themselves in day-to-day work settings. Irrespective of age, gender or status within their organizations, two-thirds of the respondents reported having mentors. Mentors were most often older than their proteges and more than half reported that their mentors were also their bosses. Three-fifths of these mentors were men. Statistical tests of differences on various socio-demographic variables and the Dimensions Of Mentoring Inventory (DOMI) highlighted differences between the perceptions of women and men proteges about their mentors. Women proteges attributed higher Nurturance scores to mentors than did men, whereas men attributed higher Competence scores to mentors than did women. Most proteges were in single-gender relationships, however the 178 (one-fifth) of respondents in cross-gender relationships showed no differences in characteristics from single-gender relationships. Proteges in management positions attributed higher Competence scores to mentors than those in nonmanagement positions. Mentoring relationships with bosses were reportedly of longer duration, with more bosses aware of their mentoring role than non bosses. Mentor/protege conflict was infrequent, but when it occurred, the mentors were characterized as Volatile and Hard Working. Interviews with 16 proteges yielded vignettes of their mentors as they recounted memorable incidents. Five themes were uluminated through interviews with proteges. The mentors' belief in their protege's capabilities; a desire on the part of proteges to be mentored; timing of the relationship; reciprocity; and affinity. This was a study of mentor characteristics as seen from proteges' points of view. Further studies utilizing confirmatory factor analysis are needed to verify the factor structure of mentor characteristics and to test alternative models. Further investigation into characteristics of mentors, particularly those in the dual role of mentor and boss, and differences in perceptions between women and men are advisable. / Education, Faculty of / Educational Studies (EDST), Department of / Graduate
4

The impact of diversity on the mentoring relationship and its effectiveness

Simelane, Lebogang A. 08 October 2014 (has links)
M.Com. (Business Management) / Please refer to full text to view abstract
5

Dimensions of mentoring relationships in the workplace [electronic resource] : a holistic perspective /

Grace-Rowland, Miriam. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Antioch University, 2008. / Title from PDF t.p. (viewed August 1, 2008). Advisor: Elizabeth Holloway. "A dissertation submitted to the Ph.D. in Leadership and Change program of Antioch University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy January 2008."--from the title page. Keywords: mentoring relationships, systems approach, managers, grounded theory, dimensional analysis, corporate mentoring programs, learning, workplace Includes bibliographical references (p. 208-229).
6

Who is motivating me to learn and how?: the effects of autonomy support and autonomy orientation on the protégé's learning in the organization.

January 2006 (has links)
Liu Dong. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 90-100). / Abstracts and questionnaires in English and Chinese. / ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS --- p.i / ABSTRACT --- p.iii / 中文摘要 --- p.v / Chapter CHAPTER 1: --- INTRODUCTION --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1 --- Theoretical Background of This Study --- p.1 / Chapter 1.2 --- Research Questions (RQ) --- p.3 / Chapter 1.3 --- Structure of the Thesis --- p.4 / Chapter CHAPTER 2: --- LITERATURE REVIEW --- p.6 / Chapter 2.1 --- Cognitive Evaluation Theory --- p.7 / Chapter 2.2 --- Organismic Integration Theory --- p.8 / Chapter 2.3 --- Causality Orientation Theory --- p.12 / Chapter 2.4 --- Basic Needs Theory --- p.14 / Chapter 2.5 --- Summary of SDT´ةs Sub-theories and Overall Structure --- p.16 / Chapter 2.6 --- Applying SDT in Organizational Research --- p.19 / Chapter CHAPTER 3: --- LINKING SDT TO MENTORING RESEARCH --- p.22 / Chapter 3.1 --- Previous Studies Regarding Motivation and Mentoring --- p.22 / Chapter 3.2 --- Development of Hypotheses --- p.25 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- "Autonomy Support, Autonomy Orientation, and Proteges' Personal Learning (Hypotheses 1, 2, and 3)" --- p.25 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Comparing the Effects of Autonomy Support and Autonomy Orientation on Proteges' Personal Learning (Hypothesis 4) --- p.31 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- Moderating Effects of Autonomy Support of Team climate (Hypotheses 5a & 5b) --- p.33 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Proteges' Personal Learning and Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) (Hypothesis 6) --- p.35 / Chapter 3.2.5 --- Proteges' Personal Learning and Job Involvement (Hypothesis 7) --- p.37 / Chapter 3.2.6 --- Proteges' Personal Learning as a Mediating Variable (Hypotheses 8a & 8b) --- p.39 / Chapter CHAPTER 4: --- METHODS --- p.47 / Chapter 4.1 --- Procedure and Respondents --- p.47 / Chapter 4.2 --- Measures --- p.49 / Chapter 4.3 --- Analytic Techniques --- p.53 / Chapter CHAPTER 5: --- RESULTS --- p.58 / Chapter 5.1 --- CFA Analyses --- p.58 / Chapter 5.2 --- Aggregation Analyses of Autonomy Support of Team climate --- p.59 / Chapter 5.3 --- Hypothesis Testing: Hierarchical Linear Modelling Analyses --- p.60 / Chapter 5.3.1 --- "Testing the Main Effects of Autonomy Support and Autonomy Orientation (Hypotheses 1, 2,& 3)" --- p.62 / Chapter 5.3.2 --- Comparing the Predictive Power of the Three Motivational Factors (Hypothesis 4). --- p.65 / Chapter 5.3.3 --- Testing the Moderating Effects of Team climate (Hypotheses 5a & 5b) --- p.66 / Chapter 5.3.4 --- "Testing the Main and Mediating Effects of Proteges' Personal Learning (Hypotheses 6, 7,8a, & 8b)" --- p.69 / Chapter CHAPTER 6: --- DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION --- p.75 / Chapter 6.1 --- Discussion on findings --- p.75 / Chapter 6.1.1 --- The Motivational Determinants of Proteges' Personal Learning --- p.76 / Chapter 6.1.2 --- The Predicting and Mediating Roles of Proteges' Personal Learning --- p.79 / Chapter 6.2 --- Implications --- p.81 / Chapter 6.3 --- Limitations and Directions for Future Research --- p.84 / Chapter 6.4 --- Conclusion --- p.89 / REFERENCE --- p.90 / APPENDIX: SURVEY INSTRUMENTS --- p.101
7

Managerial coaching: behaviors, the measure, antecedents and outcomes.

January 2004 (has links)
Lam Kit-Wing. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 65-76). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Chapter CHAPTER ONE: --- Introduction --- p.1 / Overview of Present Study --- p.4 / Managerial Coaching Scale Development --- p.4 / Managerial Coaching Objectives --- p.4 / Managerial Coaching Behaviors --- p.6 / Antecedents and Outcomes of Managerial Coaching --- p.14 / Managerial Coaching Antecedents --- p.14 / Managerial Coaching Outcomes --- p.17 / Chapter CHAPTER TWO: --- Method --- p.23 / Participants --- p.23 / Procedure --- p.23 / Measures --- p.24 / Chapter CHAPTER THREE: --- Results --- p.30 / Chapter Part I: --- Managerial Coaching Scale Development --- p.32 / Analysis Overview --- p.32 / Evaluation of Latent Structure --- p.32 / Scale Reliability and Scale Norm --- p.39 / Construct Validation --- p.42 / Chapter Part II: --- Antecedents and Outcomes of Managerial Coaching --- p.45 / Analysis Overview --- p.45 / Analysis Result --- p.45 / Chapter CHAPTER FOUR: --- Discussion --- p.55 / Managerial Coaching and Transformational Leadership --- p.56 / Implications to Research and Practice --- p.59 / Managerial Coaching Antecedents --- p.59 / Managerial Coaching Outcomes --- p.61 / Limitation and Future Research --- p.62 / Conclusion --- p.63 / REFERENCES --- p.65
8

Mentoring as a psychological contact implications for relationship development and evaluation /

Haggard, Dana L. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2006. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (Mar. 5, 2007). Includes bibliographical references.
9

Mentoring as a support intervention for the entrepreneurs of Peninsula Technikon's Technology Enterprise Centre /

Petersen, Tania. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MTech (Entrepreneurship))--Peninsula Technikon, 2002. / Word processed copy. Summary in English. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 100-104). Also available online.
10

Intentional mentoring for leadership development /

Darwin, Ann. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MEd)--University of South Australia, 1996

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