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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Wyoming ice social disorganization and methamphetamine use in a rural state /

Roussell, Aaron. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Wyoming, 2007. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on Dec. 1, 2008). Includes bibliographical references (p. 56-60).
2

The effects of methamphetamine on neurocognition in existing and recovering addicts

Van Wyk, Cindy 08 December 2011 (has links)
M.A. / The aim of the present study was to establish the existence of potential cognitive impairment in a group of 14 currently using methamphetamine addicts in comparison to a group of 17 abstinent recovering methamphetamine addicts and a matched control group of 18 participants. The current study was undertaken as methamphetamine abuse has risen dramatically over the past several years (Hart, Ward, Haney, Foltin & Fischman, 2001). This resurgence into popular culture imposes a sense of urgency for understanding the effects of methamphetamine medically and neurologically (Simon et al., 2000; Volkow et al., 2001a). Twenty nine million people consumed amphetamine-type stimulants in the late 1990s, a larger number than that of people using cocaine and opiates combined (World Health Organisation, 2001). South Africa is one of the countries world-wide that is currently experiencing a methamphetamine pandemic. The startling increase of methamphetamine use in South Africa is further exacerbated by the fact that 80 percent of methamphetamine users in the Western Cape are under 21 years of age, according to the South African National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (SANCA) (Morris & Parry, 2006). Methamphetamine has been established as neurotoxic in chronic doses abused by humans. The resultant deleterious consequences of this drug on cognitive functioning have led researchers to conclude that the observed deficits are as a direct result of methamphetamine’s neurotoxicity (Nordahl, Salo & Leamon, 2003; Vocci & Appel, 2007; Yucel, Lubman, Solowij & Brewer, 2007). Amongst the cognitive functions affected by methamphetamine, preliminary findings indicate that attention, memory and executive functioning may potentially be compromised (Barr et al., 2006). These findings need to be corroborated in the South African milieu using culture fair measuring instruments. Furthermore the possible effects of previous use of methamphetamine in recovering addicts need to be ascertained. A comparative and quantitative ex post facto research design was utilised in the research. Participants were selected according to stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. A neuropsychological test battery, comprising of pen and pencil tests, was used to assess the cognitive functions of attention, memory and executive functioning in the two experimental groups and the control participants. Statistical analysis was performed on the raw data by the Statistical Consultation Service of the University of Johannesburg. The research was conducted according to a specified code of ethics stipulated for psychological research. Significant results were established between the two experimental groups in comparison to each other and the control group for the cognitive functions of attention and memory. Assessment of executive functioning yielded results in which significant results were observed between the current and recovering users of methamphetamine and between the control group and recovering methamphetamine addicts. There were no significant results detected between the current users of methamphetamine and the control group regarding executive functioning.
3

An analysis of the behavioral and classroom interactions of children exposed to methamphetamine in the home : a dissertation presented to the faculty of the Graduate School, Tennessee Technological University /

Kline, Dara Thompson. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Tennessee Technological University, 2007. / Bibliography: leaves 82-88.
4

The relationship between social bond and frequency of methamphetamine use

Yingling, Julie Smith. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Villanova University, 2008. / Sociology & Criminal Justice Dept. Includes bibliographical references.
5

A case study examining the experiences of a methamphetamine addict and its impact on the family relationships /

September, Roxanne. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (MPsych.) -- University of the Western Cape, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 105-114).
6

The role of school counselors in the life of a student affected by methamphetamine

Kraemer, Amy K. January 2006 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references.
7

Assessing methamphetamine withdrawal symptoms in the residential substance abuse treatment patient

Garvis, Pamela J. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wyoming, 2008. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on June 23, 2009). Includes bibliographical references (p. 58-60).
8

Family dental care : perspectives from women recovering from methamphetamine addiction /

Hanks, Melissa A. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Oregon State University, 2007. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-131). Also available on the World Wide Web.
9

The inevitability of us :exploring the risk and protective factors relating to the use and / or rejection of methamphetamine amongst youth in Manenberg

Brigitte Stephanie Swarts January 2009 (has links)
<p>This study presents a discursive journey with regard to the risk and protective factors confronting individuals who engage in methamphetamine use within the Manenberg area. Given that this journey requires a cautious and sensitive approach to the meaning making of the lived experiences of the six (6) individual users (the informant base) / the study adopted an analysis process that would allow for a guided &ldquo / tour&rdquo / of these experiences. In doing so, the study made use of the grounded theory method that allowed for this guided &ldquo / tour&rdquo / to be fully anchored in the collected data. External to this data, and once the data emerged as engageable themes, the study introduced, relevantly so, Bronfenbrenner&rsquo / s social-ecological model of human development, so to multiply and deepen the meanings embedded within the data. The merging of this external frame, provided by Bronfenbrenner&rsquo / s model, and the rich data provided by the six (6) informants, uncovered critical themes in understanding the risk and protective factors at play within Manenberg. These themes relate to the historical identity of Manenberg, given the history of Apartheid, the role of the local community and its perceived tolerance of the practice of drug use, which is further echoed in the identity of the family and its limited ability to support drug users in the face of ever-growing poverty. The themes also uncovered the bipolarity in the practice of drug trade and gangsterism as serving a subsistence function, at one level, and an exploitative function at another. Furthermore, the study solidified traditional views that the peer collective is, indeed, a critical actor on the stage of drug use and that the individual (as an actor) continues to be confronted by a script of poverty and disillusionment. This script, as will be illustrated, is also active in preconceived notions of gender stratification.</p>
10

The inevitability of us :exploring the risk and protective factors relating to the use and / or rejection of methamphetamine amongst youth in Manenberg

Brigitte Stephanie Swarts January 2009 (has links)
<p>This study presents a discursive journey with regard to the risk and protective factors confronting individuals who engage in methamphetamine use within the Manenberg area. Given that this journey requires a cautious and sensitive approach to the meaning making of the lived experiences of the six (6) individual users (the informant base) / the study adopted an analysis process that would allow for a guided &ldquo / tour&rdquo / of these experiences. In doing so, the study made use of the grounded theory method that allowed for this guided &ldquo / tour&rdquo / to be fully anchored in the collected data. External to this data, and once the data emerged as engageable themes, the study introduced, relevantly so, Bronfenbrenner&rsquo / s social-ecological model of human development, so to multiply and deepen the meanings embedded within the data. The merging of this external frame, provided by Bronfenbrenner&rsquo / s model, and the rich data provided by the six (6) informants, uncovered critical themes in understanding the risk and protective factors at play within Manenberg. These themes relate to the historical identity of Manenberg, given the history of Apartheid, the role of the local community and its perceived tolerance of the practice of drug use, which is further echoed in the identity of the family and its limited ability to support drug users in the face of ever-growing poverty. The themes also uncovered the bipolarity in the practice of drug trade and gangsterism as serving a subsistence function, at one level, and an exploitative function at another. Furthermore, the study solidified traditional views that the peer collective is, indeed, a critical actor on the stage of drug use and that the individual (as an actor) continues to be confronted by a script of poverty and disillusionment. This script, as will be illustrated, is also active in preconceived notions of gender stratification.</p>

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