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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A unified approach to the formulation of non-consistent rod and beam mass matrices for improved finite element modal analysis /

Young, Kuao-John, January 1990 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1990. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 188-191). Also available via the Internet.
2

Frequency response computation for complex structures with damping and acoustic fluid

Kim, Chang-wan, Bennighof, Jeffrey Kent, January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2004. / Supervisor: Jeffrey K. Bennighof. Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
3

Operational modal analysis and model updating with a cyclostationary input

Hanson, David, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
This thesis addresses the problem of identifying the modal properties of a system based only on measurements of the system responses. This situation is frequently encountered in structural dynamics and is particularly relevant for systems where the in-service excitation is not artificially reproducible. The inherent non-linearities in these systems mean that the modal properties estimated using traditional input/output techniques will be different to those exhibited in operation. A common example from the literature is an aircraft in flight where the modal properties are heavily influenced by the operating point, i.e. the combination of load, speed, altitude etc., at which the aircraft is travelling. The process of identifying the modal properties of systems in-service is called Operational Modal Analysis (OMA). Not knowing the input complicates the analysis. Most of the techniques in the literature overcome the lack of knowledge about the unmeasured excitations by assuming they are both spatially and frequentially white, i.e. of equal magnitude and with a flat autospectrum. This thesis presents a new technique for OMA which relaxes these constraints, requiring only that the system is excited by a so called cyclostationary input with a unique cyclic frequency, and that the log spectrum of the second order component of this input is frequentially smooth, as will be explained. Such systems include vehicles with internal combustion engines as the vibration from such an engine exhibits cyclostationary statistics. In this thesis, the technique is applied to a laboratory test rig and a passenger train both using an artificial input, and to a race car using the engine as the excitation. By combining cyclostationary signal processing and the concept of the cepstrum, the technique identifies the resonances and anti-resonances in the transfer functions between each response and the cyclostationary source. These resonances and antiresonances can be used to regenerate Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) and it is shown how the unknown scaling of the system can be recovered by employing finite element model updating in conjunction with this regeneration. In addition, the contribution made to model updating by the anti-resonances is also investigated. Finally, the potential of OMA to inform a model updating process is demonstrated using an experimental case study on a diesel railcar.

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