• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 3
  • Tagged with
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Easy instances for model checking

Frick, Markus. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Freiburg (Breisgau), University, Diss., 2001.
2

The Fixpoint Checking Problem: An Abstraction Refinement Perspective

Ganty, Pierre P 28 September 2007 (has links)
<P align="justify">Model-checking is an automated technique which aims at verifying properties of computer systems. A model-checker is fed with a model of the system (which capture all its possible behaviors) and a property to verify on this model. Both are given by a convenient mathematical formalism like, for instance, a transition system for the model and a temporal logic formula for the property.</P> <P align="justify">For several reasons (the model-checking is undecidable for this class of model or the model-checking needs too much resources for this model) model-checking may not be applicable. For safety properties (which basically says "nothing bad happen"), a solution to this problem uses a simpler model for which model-checkers might terminate without too much resources. This simpler model, called the abstract model, over-approximates the behaviors of the concrete model. However the abstract model might be too imprecise. In fact, if the property is true on the abstract model, the same holds on the concrete. On the contrary, when the abstract model violates the property, either the violation is reproducible on the concrete model and so we found an error; or it is not reproducible and so the model-checker is said to be inconclusive. Inconclusiveness stems from the over-approximation of the concrete model by the abstract model. So a precise model yields the model-checker to conclude, but precision comes generally with an increased computational cost.</P> <P align="justify">Recently, a lot of work has been done to define abstraction refinement algorithms. Those algorithms compute automatically abstract models which are refined as long as the model-checker is inconclusive. In the thesis, we give a new abstraction refinement algorithm which applies for safety properties. We compare our algorithm with previous attempts to build abstract models automatically and show, using formal proofs that our approach has several advantages. We also give several extensions of our algorithm which allow to integrate existing techniques used in model-checking such as acceleration techniques.</P> <P align="justify">Following a rigorous methodology we then instantiate our algorithm for a variety of models ranging from finite state transition systems to infinite state transition systems. For each of those models we prove the instantiated algorithm terminates and provide encouraging preliminary experimental results.</P> <br> <br> <P align="justify">Le model-checking est une technique automatisée qui vise à vérifier des propriétés sur des systèmes informatiques. Les données passées au model-checker sont le modèle du système (qui en capture tous les comportements possibles) et la propriété à vérifier. Les deux sont donnés dans un formalisme mathématique adéquat tel qu'un système de transition pour le modèle et une formule de logique temporelle pour la propriété.</P> <P align="justify">Pour diverses raisons (le model-checking est indécidable pour cette classe de modèle ou le model-checking nécessite trop de ressources pour ce modèle) le model-checking peut être inapplicable. Pour des propriétés de sûreté (qui disent dans l'ensemble "il ne se produit rien d'incorrect"), une solution à ce problème recourt à un modèle simplifié pour lequel le model-checker peut terminer sans trop de ressources. Ce modèle simplifié, appelé modèle abstrait, surapproxime les comportements du modèle concret. Le modèle abstrait peut cependant être trop imprécis. En effet, si la propriété est vraie sur le modèle abstrait alors elle l'est aussi sur le modèle concret. En revanche, lorsque le modèle abstrait enfreint la propriété : soit l'infraction peut être reproduite sur le modèle concret et alors nous avons trouvé une erreur ; soit l'infraction ne peut être reproduite et dans ce cas le model-checker est dit non conclusif. Ceci provient de la surapproximation du modèle concret faite par le modèle abstrait. Un modèle précis aboutit donc à un model-checking conclusif mais son coût augmente avec sa précision.</P> <P align="justify">Récemment, différents algorithmes d'abstraction raffinement ont été proposés. Ces algorithmes calculent automatiquement des modèles abstraits qui sont progressivement raffinés jusqu'à ce que leur model-checking soit conclusif. Dans la thèse, nous définissons un nouvel algorithme d'abstraction raffinement pour les propriétés de sûreté. Nous comparons notre algorithme avec les algorithmes d'abstraction raffinement antérieurs. A l'aide de preuves formelles, nous montrons les avantages de notre approche. Par ailleurs, nous définissons des extensions de l'algorithme qui intègrent d'autres techniques utilisées en model-checking comme les techniques d'accélérations.</P> <P align="justify">Suivant une méthodologie rigoureuse, nous instancions ensuite notre algorithme pour une variété de modèles allant des systèmes de transitions finis aux systèmes de transitions infinis. Pour chacun des modèles nous établissons la terminaison de l'algorithme instancié et donnons des résultats expérimentaux préliminaires encourageants.</P>
3

Model Checking Systems with Replicated Components using CSP

Mazur, Tomasz Krzysztof January 2011 (has links)
The Parameterised Model Checking Problem asks whether an implementation Impl(t) satisfies a specification Spec(t) for all instantiations of parameter t. In general, t can determine numerous entities: the number of processes used in a network, the type of data, the capacities of buffers, etc. The main theme of this thesis is automation of uniform verification of a subclass of PMCP with the parameter of the first kind, using techniques based on counter abstraction. Counter abstraction works by counting how many, rather than which, node processes are in a given state: for nodes with k local states, an abstract state (c(1), ..., c(k)) models a global state where c(i) processes are in the i-th state. We then use a threshold function z to cap the values of each counter. If for some i, counter c(i) reaches its threshold, z(i) , then this is interpreted as there being z(i) or more nodes in the i-th state. The addition of thresholds makes abstract models independent of the instantiation of the parameter. We adapt standard counter abstraction techniques to concurrent reactive systems modelled using the CSP process algebra. We demonstrate how to produce abstract models of systems that do not use node identifiers (i.e. where all nodes are indistinguishable). Every such abstraction is, by construction, refined by all instantiations of the implementation. If the abstract model satisfies the specification, then a positive answer to the particular uniform verification problem can be deduced. We show that by adding node identifiers we make the uniform verification problem undecidable. We demonstrate a sound abstraction method that extends standard counter abstraction techniques to systems that make full use of node identifiers (in specifications and implementations). However, on its own, the method is not enough to give the answer to verification problems for all parameter instantiations. This issue has led us to the development of a type reduction theory, which, for a given verification problem, establishes a function phi that maps all (sufficiently large) instantiations T of the parameter to some fixed type T and allows us to deduce that if Spec(T) is refined by phi(Impl(T)), then Spec(T) is refined by Impl(T). We can then combine this with our extended counter abstraction techniques and conclude that if the abstract model satisfies Spec(T), then the answer to the uniform verification problem is positive. We develop a symbolic operational semantics for CSP processes that satisfy certain normality requirements and we provide a set of translation rules that allow us to concretise symbolic transition graphs. The type reduction theory relies heavily on these results. One of the main advantages of our symbolic operational semantics and the type reduction theory is their generality, which makes them applicable in other settings and allows the theory to be combined with abstraction methods other than those used in this thesis. Finally, we present TomCAT, a tool that automates the construction of counter abstraction models and we demonstrate how our results apply in practice.
4

The Fixpoint checking problem: an abstraction refinement perspective

Ganty, Pierre 28 September 2007 (has links)
<P align="justify">Model-checking is an automated technique which aims at verifying properties of computer systems. A model-checker is fed with a model of the system (which capture all its possible behaviors) and a property to verify on this model. Both are given by a convenient mathematical formalism like, for instance, a transition system for the model and a temporal logic formula for the property.</P><p><p><P align="justify">For several reasons (the model-checking is undecidable for this class of model or the model-checking needs too much resources for this model) model-checking may not be applicable. For safety properties (which basically says "nothing bad happen"), a solution to this problem uses a simpler model for which model-checkers might terminate without too much resources. This simpler model, called the abstract model, over-approximates the behaviors of the concrete model. However the abstract model might be too imprecise. In fact, if the property is true on the abstract model, the same holds on the concrete. On the contrary, when the abstract model violates the property, either the violation is reproducible on the concrete model and so we found an error; or it is not reproducible and so the model-checker is said to be inconclusive. Inconclusiveness stems from the over-approximation of the concrete model by the abstract model. So a precise model yields the model-checker to conclude, but precision comes generally with an increased computational cost.</P><p><p><P align="justify">Recently, a lot of work has been done to define abstraction refinement algorithms. Those algorithms compute automatically abstract models which are refined as long as the model-checker is inconclusive. In the thesis, we give a new abstraction refinement algorithm which applies for safety properties. We compare our algorithm with previous attempts to build abstract models automatically and show, using formal proofs that our approach has several advantages. We also give several extensions of our algorithm which allow to integrate existing techniques used in model-checking such as acceleration techniques.</P><p><p><P align="justify">Following a rigorous methodology we then instantiate our algorithm for a variety of models ranging from finite state transition systems to infinite state transition systems. For each of those models we prove the instantiated algorithm terminates and provide encouraging preliminary experimental results.</P><p><br><p><br><p><P align="justify">Le model-checking est une technique automatisée qui vise à vérifier des propriétés sur des systèmes informatiques. Les données passées au model-checker sont le modèle du système (qui en capture tous les comportements possibles) et la propriété à vérifier. Les deux sont donnés dans un formalisme mathématique adéquat tel qu'un système de transition pour le modèle et une formule de logique temporelle pour la propriété.</P><p><p><P align="justify">Pour diverses raisons (le model-checking est indécidable pour cette classe de modèle ou le model-checking nécessite trop de ressources pour ce modèle) le model-checking peut être inapplicable. Pour des propriétés de sûreté (qui disent dans l'ensemble "il ne se produit rien d'incorrect"), une solution à ce problème recourt à un modèle simplifié pour lequel le model-checker peut terminer sans trop de ressources. Ce modèle simplifié, appelé modèle abstrait, surapproxime les comportements du modèle concret. Le modèle abstrait peut cependant être trop imprécis. En effet, si la propriété est vraie sur le modèle abstrait alors elle l'est aussi sur le modèle concret. En revanche, lorsque le modèle abstrait enfreint la propriété :soit l'infraction peut être reproduite sur le modèle concret et alors nous avons trouvé une erreur ;soit l'infraction ne peut être reproduite et dans ce cas le model-checker est dit non conclusif. Ceci provient de la surapproximation du modèle concret faite par le modèle abstrait. Un modèle précis aboutit donc à un model-checking conclusif mais son coût augmente avec sa précision.</P><p><P align="justify">Récemment, différents algorithmes d'abstraction raffinement ont été proposés. Ces algorithmes calculent automatiquement des modèles abstraits qui sont progressivement raffinés jusqu'à ce que leur model-checking soit conclusif. Dans la thèse, nous définissons un nouvel algorithme d'abstraction raffinement pour les propriétés de sûreté. Nous comparons notre algorithme avec les algorithmes d'abstraction raffinement antérieurs. A l'aide de preuves formelles, nous montrons les avantages de notre approche. Par ailleurs, nous définissons des extensions de l'algorithme qui intègrent d'autres techniques utilisées en model-checking comme les techniques d'accélérations.</P><p><P align="justify">Suivant une méthodologie rigoureuse, nous instancions ensuite notre algorithme pour une variété de modèles allant des systèmes de transitions finis aux systèmes de transitions infinis. Pour chacun des modèles nous établissons la terminaison de l'algorithme instancié et donnons des résultats expérimentaux préliminaires encourageants.</P><p><p> / Doctorat en Sciences / info:eu-repo/semantics/nonPublished

Page generated in 0.0999 seconds