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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An empirical investigation of mood regulation description, structure and mood correlates /

Buckingham, Sarah. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (BA(Hons) (Psychology)) - Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, 2006. / "October 2006". A thesis is submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree BA (Honours), [Faculty of Life and Social Sciences], Swinburne University of Technology - 2006. Typescript.
2

Mood and memory mapping the cognitive-emotive structure /

Pierson, Eric E. McBride, Dawn M. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Illinois State University, 2007. / Title from title page screen, viewed on February 15, 2008. Dissertation Committee: Dawn M. McBride (chair), Alvin E. House, Karla J. Doepke, Robert Peterson. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 94-100) and abstract. Also available in print.
3

The psychophysiological consequences of depressed mood-related cognitive responses

Donaldson, Bruce William, n/a January 2006 (has links)
A substantial amount of research has investigated the psychophysiological profiles of various mood and emotional states; however, very little research has investigated individuals� mood responses from a psychophysiological perspective. As a result, little is known about the psychophysiological reactivity of individuals to various mood-related responses, or the ability of psychophysiological measures to differentiate between response styles. Furthermore, most investigations in the area of mood-related response styles have relied on participants self-report responses of their mood reactivity, which is considered to be susceptible to demand characteristics and response bias. Psychophysiological measures are thought to offer a unique and alternative measure of mood reactivity that can corroborate, or challenge self-report findings. They are considered to be less susceptible to demand effects than self-report, and can detect subtle changes in mood reactivity activity when an overt response is not apparent. In view of this, the primary objective of this thesis was to move beyond a reliance on subjective self-report measurements of mood reactivity, and to investigate the consequences of depressed mood-related cognitive response styles from a psychophysiological perspective. As part of this investigation, this thesis aims to address a number of theoretical and practical questions relating to the use of psychophysiological measures in mood research and clinical practice. The research is divided into four studies, each one focusing on a particular aspect of the investigation. The aim of Study 1 was to select and trial a laboratory-based mood induction procedure (MIP) and a self-report mood measure, with the intention of developing a reliable method of inducing and measuring depressed mood. Two film clips that contained either positive or negative affective content were presented to participants. Self-report responses on the Mood Scale confirmed that the negative film clip elicited a very unpleasant mood state with high emotional arousal, and that the positive film clip elicited a mildly pleasant mood state with low emotional arousal. The positive and negative Film Clip MIPs were then used in Studies 2 and 2a, to investigate participants� psychophysiological reactivity to induced mood. The aim of Studies 2 and 2a was to identify a set of psychophysiological measures that would differentiate between participants� mood states. In Study 2, the positive and negative Film Clip MIPs, from Study 1, were again presented to participants. Corrugator supercilii facial EMG activity, zygomaticus major facial EMG activity, skin conductance activity (SCA), heart rate (plethysmograph, sphygmomanometer), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and self-report ratings on the Mood Scale were recorded. Results confirmed that participant self-reported affective responses were similar to those reported in Study 1; however, mixed results were obtained in regards to individuals� psychophysiological responses to the MIPs. Facial EMG activity and heart rate (plethysmograph) were consistent with participants� self-reported mood, whereas, SCA and systolic blood pressure were inconsistent with participants� self-reported mood. Diastolic blood pressure and heart rate (sphygmomanometer) did not differentiate between the MIPs. As the results were somewhat contradictory to expectations, it was decided to further investigate the psychophysiology of induced mood in Study 2a, using a revised set of psychophysiological measures. In Study 2a, the positive and negative Film Clip MIPs were again presented to participants. Corrugator supercilii facial EMG activity, zygomaticus major facial EMG activity, SCA, heart rate (ECG), and finger temperature, were recorded along with participants� Mood Scale ratings. It was found that facial EMG activity and SCA, paralleled participant self-report as expected, and were most responsive to participants� change in mood state. Heart rate (ECG) and finger temperature did not clearly differentiate between the induced mood states. The aim of Study 3 was to conduct an experimental, laboratory-based investigation, into the psychophysiological and subjective mood consequences of two cognitive response styles: self-focused depressive rumination and external-focused distraction. As in the previous study, the negative Film Clip MIP and the Mood Scale were used to induce depressed mood and to measure participants� subjective mood state. Psychophysiological reactivity was recorded by measuring participants� corrugator supercilii facial EMG, zygomaticus major facial EMG, SCA, heart rate (sphygmomanometer), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Trait response style was measured using the Response Style Questionnaire (RSQ; Nolen-Hoeksema & Morrow, 1991) and social desirability was measured using the Marlowe Crowne-Social Desirability Scale (MC-SDS; Crowne & Marlowe, 1960). As predicted by the Response Style Theory of depression (RST), increased self-reported negative mood was found when participants responded to the induced depressed mood, using a self-focused depressive rumination response style, rather than an external-focused distraction response style. Psychophysiological activity increased over the course of the negative Film Clip MIP for all psychophysiological measures, however, only corrugator supercilii facial EMG activity clearly differentiated between the cognitive response styles, in a way predicted by individuals� self-report responses. There was no evidence of a relationship between participants� trait response style and their psychophysiological reactivity or mood responses during the experiment. However, individuals high in trait rumination reported greater depressive symptomatology, and less mood reactivity during the experiment, than those high in trait distraction. Furthermore, participants� ratings of social desirability were positively associated with their level of depressive symptomatology and trait rumination. The aim of Study 4 was to conduct a pilot study to investigate the psychophysiological consequences of two further cognitive response styles: negative automatic thoughts and positive autobiographical recall. A series of twelve single-case (ABC-ABC) experiments were carried out using a procedure analogous to a clinical therapy process. Initially a depressed Story MIP was used to induce a depressed mood in participants (A). Participants were then required to respond to their depressed mood using negative self-statements (B), and positive autobiographical recall (C). Consistent with previous studies, zygomaticus major facial EMG and corrugator supercilii facial EMG clearly paralleled participants� mood reactivity throughout the experiment, whereas SCA and heart rate showed less consistent patterns of reactivity. This thesis has made an important contribution to mood and psychophysiological research by presenting the first in-depth investigation into the psychophysiological consequences of how people respond to depressed mood, from both a theoretical and a clinical perspective. It is anticipated that the findings of this research will bring about further investigation into the comparative efficacy of various brief mood-related cognitive intervention techniques, which will ultimately assist scientist-practitioners in selecting suitable brief cognitive intervention techniques for helping clients ameliorate their negative mood, emotional, and cognitive states.
4

The role of affective memories and mood in judgments of alcohol use

Steiner, Scott MacKenzie. January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2002. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Available also from UMI Company.
5

The after-exercise shower its effect upon mood /

McGinnis, Jennifer L. Pargman, David. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Florida State University, 2004. / Advisor: Dr. David Pargman, Florida State University, College of Education, Department of Educational Psychology & Learning Systems. Title and description from dissertation home page (viewed June 17, 2004). Includes bibliographical references.
6

Premenstrual syndrome in context

McFarlane, Jessica 05 1900 (has links)
This study was designed to address several issues related to PMS. One purpose was to compare women who say they have PMS with those who say they do not have PMS and to compare women diagnosed with PMS with those not diagnosed as having it. Forty-eight women and 11 men (included for comparison) who had a mean age of 34 years, were not students, and met other screening criteria, volunteered to keep daily charts for 120 days (prospective daily data). They did not know the menstrual purpose of the study. Each participant's daily reports were examined individually for PMS patterns according to strict criteria, and they were accordingly assigned to one of five groups. Only six women (12.5%) met the diagnostic criteria for premenstrual syndrome, but 62.5% said they had PMS. Fourteen women and 2 men (randomly assigned to menstrual cycles), 28% of the total sample, had diagnosable "downs" in other phases. The greater proportion of diagnosable downs in phases other than the premenstrual phase calls into question the appropriateness of a singular focus on PMS rather than on general cyclicity in adults' day-to-day experiences. Indeed, 74% of all participants in this study(including 73% of the men) had one or more diagnosed cyclic patterns in at least one of the three (menstrual, day of week, lunar) cycles studied. Participants also recalled (retrospective data) their menstrual (women only), weekday, and lunar moods. When prospective and retrospective data were compared, analyses revealed that participants may have used menstrual and day of week stereotypes to assist in their recall. Both parametric (normative) and nonparametric (idiographic)analyses were conducted, with sometimes contrasting results. These contradictions and their implications are discussed. It was concluded that it may be inappropriate to refer to a premenstrual syndrome, that the proposed inclusion of Late Luteal Phase Dysphoric Disorder (LLPDD) in the Psychiatric Diagnostic and Statistics Manual (DSM) is questionable, and that more needs to be known about healthy cyclical changes before conclusions about unhealthy cyclic changes can be drawn.
7

Effects of mood on survey responses

Schoob, Christine Eilene 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
8

The psychophysiological consequences of depressed mood-related cognitive responses

Donaldson, Bruce William, n/a January 2006 (has links)
A substantial amount of research has investigated the psychophysiological profiles of various mood and emotional states; however, very little research has investigated individuals� mood responses from a psychophysiological perspective. As a result, little is known about the psychophysiological reactivity of individuals to various mood-related responses, or the ability of psychophysiological measures to differentiate between response styles. Furthermore, most investigations in the area of mood-related response styles have relied on participants self-report responses of their mood reactivity, which is considered to be susceptible to demand characteristics and response bias. Psychophysiological measures are thought to offer a unique and alternative measure of mood reactivity that can corroborate, or challenge self-report findings. They are considered to be less susceptible to demand effects than self-report, and can detect subtle changes in mood reactivity activity when an overt response is not apparent. In view of this, the primary objective of this thesis was to move beyond a reliance on subjective self-report measurements of mood reactivity, and to investigate the consequences of depressed mood-related cognitive response styles from a psychophysiological perspective. As part of this investigation, this thesis aims to address a number of theoretical and practical questions relating to the use of psychophysiological measures in mood research and clinical practice. The research is divided into four studies, each one focusing on a particular aspect of the investigation. The aim of Study 1 was to select and trial a laboratory-based mood induction procedure (MIP) and a self-report mood measure, with the intention of developing a reliable method of inducing and measuring depressed mood. Two film clips that contained either positive or negative affective content were presented to participants. Self-report responses on the Mood Scale confirmed that the negative film clip elicited a very unpleasant mood state with high emotional arousal, and that the positive film clip elicited a mildly pleasant mood state with low emotional arousal. The positive and negative Film Clip MIPs were then used in Studies 2 and 2a, to investigate participants� psychophysiological reactivity to induced mood. The aim of Studies 2 and 2a was to identify a set of psychophysiological measures that would differentiate between participants� mood states. In Study 2, the positive and negative Film Clip MIPs, from Study 1, were again presented to participants. Corrugator supercilii facial EMG activity, zygomaticus major facial EMG activity, skin conductance activity (SCA), heart rate (plethysmograph, sphygmomanometer), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and self-report ratings on the Mood Scale were recorded. Results confirmed that participant self-reported affective responses were similar to those reported in Study 1; however, mixed results were obtained in regards to individuals� psychophysiological responses to the MIPs. Facial EMG activity and heart rate (plethysmograph) were consistent with participants� self-reported mood, whereas, SCA and systolic blood pressure were inconsistent with participants� self-reported mood. Diastolic blood pressure and heart rate (sphygmomanometer) did not differentiate between the MIPs. As the results were somewhat contradictory to expectations, it was decided to further investigate the psychophysiology of induced mood in Study 2a, using a revised set of psychophysiological measures. In Study 2a, the positive and negative Film Clip MIPs were again presented to participants. Corrugator supercilii facial EMG activity, zygomaticus major facial EMG activity, SCA, heart rate (ECG), and finger temperature, were recorded along with participants� Mood Scale ratings. It was found that facial EMG activity and SCA, paralleled participant self-report as expected, and were most responsive to participants� change in mood state. Heart rate (ECG) and finger temperature did not clearly differentiate between the induced mood states. The aim of Study 3 was to conduct an experimental, laboratory-based investigation, into the psychophysiological and subjective mood consequences of two cognitive response styles: self-focused depressive rumination and external-focused distraction. As in the previous study, the negative Film Clip MIP and the Mood Scale were used to induce depressed mood and to measure participants� subjective mood state. Psychophysiological reactivity was recorded by measuring participants� corrugator supercilii facial EMG, zygomaticus major facial EMG, SCA, heart rate (sphygmomanometer), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Trait response style was measured using the Response Style Questionnaire (RSQ; Nolen-Hoeksema & Morrow, 1991) and social desirability was measured using the Marlowe Crowne-Social Desirability Scale (MC-SDS; Crowne & Marlowe, 1960). As predicted by the Response Style Theory of depression (RST), increased self-reported negative mood was found when participants responded to the induced depressed mood, using a self-focused depressive rumination response style, rather than an external-focused distraction response style. Psychophysiological activity increased over the course of the negative Film Clip MIP for all psychophysiological measures, however, only corrugator supercilii facial EMG activity clearly differentiated between the cognitive response styles, in a way predicted by individuals� self-report responses. There was no evidence of a relationship between participants� trait response style and their psychophysiological reactivity or mood responses during the experiment. However, individuals high in trait rumination reported greater depressive symptomatology, and less mood reactivity during the experiment, than those high in trait distraction. Furthermore, participants� ratings of social desirability were positively associated with their level of depressive symptomatology and trait rumination. The aim of Study 4 was to conduct a pilot study to investigate the psychophysiological consequences of two further cognitive response styles: negative automatic thoughts and positive autobiographical recall. A series of twelve single-case (ABC-ABC) experiments were carried out using a procedure analogous to a clinical therapy process. Initially a depressed Story MIP was used to induce a depressed mood in participants (A). Participants were then required to respond to their depressed mood using negative self-statements (B), and positive autobiographical recall (C). Consistent with previous studies, zygomaticus major facial EMG and corrugator supercilii facial EMG clearly paralleled participants� mood reactivity throughout the experiment, whereas SCA and heart rate showed less consistent patterns of reactivity. This thesis has made an important contribution to mood and psychophysiological research by presenting the first in-depth investigation into the psychophysiological consequences of how people respond to depressed mood, from both a theoretical and a clinical perspective. It is anticipated that the findings of this research will bring about further investigation into the comparative efficacy of various brief mood-related cognitive intervention techniques, which will ultimately assist scientist-practitioners in selecting suitable brief cognitive intervention techniques for helping clients ameliorate their negative mood, emotional, and cognitive states.
9

The effects of aerobic activity on psychological mood states in college-age females /

Bradbury, Elizabeth. January 1989 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin -- La Crosse, 1989. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 51-53).
10

Personality structure and mood in female college students

Tobacyk, Jerome John, January 1977 (has links)
Thesis--University of Florida. / Description based on print version record. Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 154-157).

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