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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The core stability, club head velocity and ball carry in golfers with and without low back pain : a comparative study

Bower, Guy January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.Tech.: Chiropractic)--Durban University of Technology, 2008 / The core stability, club head velocity and ball carry in golfers with and without low back pain – a comparative study. Objective: The aims of this study was to establish whether an observable difference exists in the abdominal core stability of two comparable groups of golfers: one asymptomatic and the other suffering from low back pain, and whether an observable reduction of performance, expressed as club head velocity and ball carry can be observed in those with low back pain. First Objective was to differentiate the groups at baseline with respect to core stability strength between asymptomatic golfers and golfers suffering from low back pain. Whereas the Second Objective was to establish whether a relationship exists between abdominal core stability, CHV and ball carry in the two population groups under study. Following the above the Third Objective was to establish which other factors besides core stability strength have an effect on CHV and ball carry. And lastly the Fourth Objective was to establish the correlation between CHV and ball carry. Design: A comparative study was carried out between the two sample groups. A sample of forty patients were selected for this study, where twenty patients were asymptomatic and had no current episode of low back pain and were able to maintain a core contraction; and the other twenty patients low back pain and could not maintain a core contraction. Because the patients presented in a random manner, the patients were matched as close as possible according to age, so as to have better comparative value between the groups (the maximum age difference of a year was instituted). This allowed for comparisons among similar ages, with the difference being their low back pain and core contraction status. Outcome Measure: Each golfer was required to hit 5 balls using a standard club (in this study, a standard driver was used), after which an average value v was calculated for CHV and ball carry. All measurements were carried out using the Flightscope Pro machine at the Durban Pro Shop. Results: Core stability and low back pain did not influence CHV. However there was a non significant trend which indicated higher ball carry in the group with better core stability and no low back pain than in the group with low back pain and poor core stability. Increasing age and handicap reduced the CHV and ball carry values significantly. Ball carry and CHV were positively correlated together in both groups.
2

The core stability, club head velocity and ball carry in golfers with and without low back pain : a comparative study

Bower, Guy January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.Tech.: Chiropractic)--Durban University of Technology, 2008 / The core stability, club head velocity and ball carry in golfers with and without low back pain – a comparative study. Objective: The aims of this study was to establish whether an observable difference exists in the abdominal core stability of two comparable groups of golfers: one asymptomatic and the other suffering from low back pain, and whether an observable reduction of performance, expressed as club head velocity and ball carry can be observed in those with low back pain. First Objective was to differentiate the groups at baseline with respect to core stability strength between asymptomatic golfers and golfers suffering from low back pain. Whereas the Second Objective was to establish whether a relationship exists between abdominal core stability, CHV and ball carry in the two population groups under study. Following the above the Third Objective was to establish which other factors besides core stability strength have an effect on CHV and ball carry. And lastly the Fourth Objective was to establish the correlation between CHV and ball carry. Design: A comparative study was carried out between the two sample groups. A sample of forty patients were selected for this study, where twenty patients were asymptomatic and had no current episode of low back pain and were able to maintain a core contraction; and the other twenty patients low back pain and could not maintain a core contraction. Because the patients presented in a random manner, the patients were matched as close as possible according to age, so as to have better comparative value between the groups (the maximum age difference of a year was instituted). This allowed for comparisons among similar ages, with the difference being their low back pain and core contraction status. Outcome Measure: Each golfer was required to hit 5 balls using a standard club (in this study, a standard driver was used), after which an average value v was calculated for CHV and ball carry. All measurements were carried out using the Flightscope Pro machine at the Durban Pro Shop. Results: Core stability and low back pain did not influence CHV. However there was a non significant trend which indicated higher ball carry in the group with better core stability and no low back pain than in the group with low back pain and poor core stability. Increasing age and handicap reduced the CHV and ball carry values significantly. Ball carry and CHV were positively correlated together in both groups.
3

The effects of familiarization sessions on maximal strength testing in pre-pubescent children

Riley, Zachary A. January 2004 (has links)
It was hypothesized that the number of familiarization sessions may have an effect on the pre-testing measures recorded before a training study. This study considered a group of children (8-12 years old) placed into familiarization (FM, 4 sessions) and non-familiarization (NFM, 2 sessions) groups. Strength values in a vertical chest press and horizontal leg press were recorded for both groups. The FM group displayed strength increases in the chest press, while both groups increased leg press strength (a 0.05). The FM group also displayed significant increases over the NFM group in both exercises. The results demonstrated that, in the FM group, significant changes in chest press strength were made in the last two sessions while significant leg press changes were noted in the first two sessions. It can be concluded that the amount of familiarization sessions performed prior to testing can have an impact on pre-testing strength measures. / School of Physical Education
4

Isokinetic force profile of the cervical spine in a healthy adult urban South African population

Olivier, Pierre Emile January 2008 (has links)
The aim of this study was to establish reference data for the cervical spine’s dynamic force characteristics in a healthy adult urban South African population aged 19 to 69 years. The reference data was classified according to gender discriminate age categories. In total ten gender discriminate age categories, five male and five female, were created; 19 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50 to 59 and 60 to 69-year-olds. The force characteristics measured, analysed and used to generate reference data in stanine format were: absolute peak torque (P-), relative peak torque (P-/BW), peak power (Pow-), relative peak power (Pow-/BW), peak work (W-), relative peak work (W-/BW), torque acceleration energy (TAE-), maximal voluntary cervical muscle contraction range of motion (MVCR-), controlled full range of joint motion (CFR-), joint angle at peak torque (Jang@P-) and peak torque ratios for cervical flexion (-F), extension (-E), lateral flexion to the dominant (-LD) and non-dominant (-LN) sides. In addition biographic and anthropometric data was also collected. Data, grouped in the ten gender discriminate age categories were compared and statistically and practically significant differences were highlighted between the gender discriminate age categories. Inferential statistics used included ANOVA and Cohen’s d. A significance level of α = .05 was used in all inferential statistical analyses. Correlations between various anthropometric and isokinetic strength variables were also explored.
5

The relationship between core stability and bowling speed in asymptomatic male indoor action cricket bowlers

Hilligan, Bruce Kevin January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.Tech.: Chiropractic)- Dept. of Chiropractic, Durban University of Technology, 2008. x, 52 leaves, Appendices A-E, [25] leaves. / To determine whether a relationship exists between core stability and bowling speed in Action Cricket bowlers. Methods: Thirty asymptomatic indoor Action Cricket fast and fast-medium bowlers were divided into two groups of 15 each, with Group A having well-developed core stability and group B having poorly-developed core stability. The concept of matched pairs was used for age and cricket experience in order to maintain homogeneity between the groups. The core stability and bowling speed of each participant was measured using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU) and speed sports radar respectively. SPSS version 15.0 was used to analyse the data.
6

A comparison study between core stability and trunk extensor endurance training in the management of acute low back pain in field hockey players

Clarke, Lloyed January 2009 (has links)
Dissertation submitted in partial compliance with the requirements for the Master’s Degree in Technology: Chiropractic at the Durban University of Technology, 2009 / Objectives: When we consider the body position of a field hockey player, the lumbar spine is always in a flexed position, which combined with rotational movements during various hitting and pushing techniques, increases the strain upon the spine and surrounding muscles, thus leading to low back pain. To determine the relationship between core strength and trunk extensor endurance relating to the incidence of acute low back pain in field hockey players. Project Design: The research project was in the form of a quantitative cross-sectional study, using human subjects. Setting: The research project occurred during the field hockey season (2008) with players who had acute low back pain. The players were clinically assessed and subdivided into necessary groups at the Chiropractic Day Clinic at the Durban Institute of Technology. Subjects: Adult, male patients, aged between 18 and 30 years of age, playing premier field hockey. Out of the thirty players, 12 players have played in the National u/21 squad, 7 players have played in a Junior National team and 11 players have played senior provincial field hockey. Outcome measure: This included three tests. Firstly, the absolute difference of pressure from the reference value of 70mmHg (prone) and 40mmHg (supine) was used as the outcome measure on a Pressure Biofeedback Unit and length of time (in seconds), a correct contraction of the core stability muscles was maintained. Secondly, the length of time (in seconds) for Trunk Extensor Endurance. Thirdly, repeated measures for NRS-101 and Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale for the duration of the research period. v Results: It was found that there was no statistical evidence or convincing trend to show that the training programmes (core stability and trunk extensor endurance) increased the subjects’ core strength or trunk extensor endurance in the time allocated, although there seemed to be a placebo effect in the Trunk Extensor Group, which showed improvement in some of the core stability outcomes. There was statistical evidence that the intervention (training programmes) reduced pain, according to the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (Quebec) score over time, and a non-significant trend suggested this according to the Numerical Rating Scale-101 (NRS). Since both groups’ NRS and Quebec scores were not significantly different at baseline, the difference can be attributed to the effect of the intervention. Conclusions: The results of this study found that the Trunk Extensor Endurance Group, that performed the trunk extensor endurance training programme, yielded better results in core stability and trunk extensor endurance. However, the Core Stability Group, that performed the core stability training programme, showed a quicker reduction in pain levels during the three week intervention period. Therefore, by combining both training programmes, future rehabilitation of athletes suffering from acute low back pain will be more successful. Sport performance of the athletes (field hockey players), through the proponents of swiss ball training, will also improve.
7

The effect of mental training in delaying muscle fatigue

Wu Cheng, Kam-chee, Polina., 胡鄭金枝. January 2000 (has links)
published_or_final_version / abstract / toc / Psychology / Master / Master of Philosophy
8

Determining the validity and reliability of the Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester as a measure of isometric strength in women with arthritis

Sierra, Nelson 20 January 1994 (has links)
The purpose of this investigation was to determine the validity and reliability of the Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester (NMMT), a portable dynamometer, as a measure of the isometric strength in women with arthritis. Female subjects (N=13; 66 �� 13.89 yrs.) with arthritis were tested for isometric muscle strength on the shoulder and hip (abduction, adduction, flexion, extension). Subjects were tested on three separate days using NMMT and Kincom 500-H dynamometers. Each subject performed three maximal isometric contractions for each joint action. A visual analog pain scale was used to determine level of pain prior to testing. Reliability values based on intraclass correlations coefficients (R) ranged from .85 to .93., with the exception of shoulder abduction being .49. Validity was determined correlating the mean value of the NMMT score with corresponding Kincom isometric measure. Pearson product moment correlations ranged from (r) .02 to .86, with 4 of 8 values meeting .05 level of significance. Correlation coefficients for pain and isometric force values were inconclusive and ranged from -.305 to .218. Major conclusions were: a) NMMT had high test-retest reliability in this sample; b) NMMT provides little criterion evidence of validity with the Kincom for most movements of hip and shoulder; c) level of pain was not a significant factor in subject reliability. / Graduation date: 1995
9

The relationship between core stability and bowling speed in asymptomatic male indoor action cricket bowlers

Hilligan, Bruce Kevin January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.Tech.: Chiropractic)- Dept. of Chiropractic, Durban University of Technology, 2008. x, 52 leaves, Appendices A-E, [25] leaves. / To determine whether a relationship exists between core stability and bowling speed in Action Cricket bowlers. Methods: Thirty asymptomatic indoor Action Cricket fast and fast-medium bowlers were divided into two groups of 15 each, with Group A having well-developed core stability and group B having poorly-developed core stability. The concept of matched pairs was used for age and cricket experience in order to maintain homogeneity between the groups. The core stability and bowling speed of each participant was measured using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU) and speed sports radar respectively. SPSS version 15.0 was used to analyse the data.
10

A comparison study between core stability and trunk extensor endurance training in the management of acute low back pain in field hockey players

Clarke, Lloyed January 2009 (has links)
Dissertation submitted in partial compliance with the requirements for the Master’s Degree in Technology: Chiropractic at the Durban University of Technology, 2009 / Objectives: When we consider the body position of a field hockey player, the lumbar spine is always in a flexed position, which combined with rotational movements during various hitting and pushing techniques, increases the strain upon the spine and surrounding muscles, thus leading to low back pain. To determine the relationship between core strength and trunk extensor endurance relating to the incidence of acute low back pain in field hockey players. Project Design: The research project was in the form of a quantitative cross-sectional study, using human subjects. Setting: The research project occurred during the field hockey season (2008) with players who had acute low back pain. The players were clinically assessed and subdivided into necessary groups at the Chiropractic Day Clinic at the Durban Institute of Technology. Subjects: Adult, male patients, aged between 18 and 30 years of age, playing premier field hockey. Out of the thirty players, 12 players have played in the National u/21 squad, 7 players have played in a Junior National team and 11 players have played senior provincial field hockey. Outcome measure: This included three tests. Firstly, the absolute difference of pressure from the reference value of 70mmHg (prone) and 40mmHg (supine) was used as the outcome measure on a Pressure Biofeedback Unit and length of time (in seconds), a correct contraction of the core stability muscles was maintained. Secondly, the length of time (in seconds) for Trunk Extensor Endurance. Thirdly, repeated measures for NRS-101 and Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale for the duration of the research period. v Results: It was found that there was no statistical evidence or convincing trend to show that the training programmes (core stability and trunk extensor endurance) increased the subjects’ core strength or trunk extensor endurance in the time allocated, although there seemed to be a placebo effect in the Trunk Extensor Group, which showed improvement in some of the core stability outcomes. There was statistical evidence that the intervention (training programmes) reduced pain, according to the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (Quebec) score over time, and a non-significant trend suggested this according to the Numerical Rating Scale-101 (NRS). Since both groups’ NRS and Quebec scores were not significantly different at baseline, the difference can be attributed to the effect of the intervention. Conclusions: The results of this study found that the Trunk Extensor Endurance Group, that performed the trunk extensor endurance training programme, yielded better results in core stability and trunk extensor endurance. However, the Core Stability Group, that performed the core stability training programme, showed a quicker reduction in pain levels during the three week intervention period. Therefore, by combining both training programmes, future rehabilitation of athletes suffering from acute low back pain will be more successful. Sport performance of the athletes (field hockey players), through the proponents of swiss ball training, will also improve.

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