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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Epistle of Othea to Hector: a 'lytil bibell of knyghthod',

Christine, Babyngton, Anthony, Gordon, James Daniel, January 1942 (has links)
J.D. Gordon's thesis (PH. D.)--University of Pennsylvania, 1940. / "[The] translation ... is ascribed to Anthony Babyngton."--p. xxxi. "Partial bibliography": p. lxiv-lxv.
2

Die beziehungen der japanischen mythologie zur griechischen ...

Franz, Eckart, January 1932 (has links)
Inaug.-diss.--Bonn. / Lebenslauf. "Literaturverzeichnis": p. 123-128.
3

Three units in mythology for the junior high school

Demaine, Kathryn Sullivan January 1966 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Boston University / PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you. / I. PROBLEM: To construct three units in mythology, Greek, Norse and Hindu, in order to increase students' awareness of the nature of literature and of the influence of these three cultures as represented in their mythologies on English language and literature. II. SCOPE AND LIMITATION: The units were designed for use in the junior high school in the following sequence: Seventh year - Greek Eighth year - Norse Ninth year - Hindu to obtain the benefit of cumulative effect upon the learnings. Each section however, is a complete unit and can be used independently of the others. The units are not all inclusive, but the selection of materials in each unit is such that a logical framework is imposed. The units make no provision for formal instruction in language. The units are untested. III. PROCEDURE: The units were designed for use in a team teaching situation. Each unit is introduced with a lecture to the entire' group for the purpose of providing background information, motivational aids and distributing materials. Groups then read and discuss the various creation stories around certain themes in their separate classrooms. The activities are discussed and groups are formed according to three activity sections each under the direction of a different teacher, one for reading, one for writing, and one for oral activities. IV. MAJOR FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: The "classical" literatures contain materials appropriate to the reading interests and abilities of junior high school students and by arranging this material in units the teacher has an opportunity to guide students toward realizing the goals of the English language arts. V. SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER STUDY: The writer recommends that these materials be tested both in independent and sequential units and in both traditional teaching and team-teaching situations for the purpose of evaluation and revision. The writer also suggests that similar materials be constructed from the biblical, classical, and medieval epics. / 2031-01-01
4

Mythic transformations: tree symbolism in the Norse plantation

McGillivray, Andrew 31 March 2011 (has links)
This thesis explores tree symbolism as interpreted from a selection of Old Norse poetic and prose mythological sources. The primary poetic sources include the Eddic poems Vǫluspá, Hávamál, Grímnismál, Vafþrúðnismál, Lokasenna and Baldrs draumur. Selected fragments from these poems are arranged and analyzed with particular attention to the symbol of the tree. Fragments are also selected from Gylfaginning of Snorri’s Edda, and are explored alongside the poetic sources. The focus topics progress from a description of the tree at the beginning of time, as the spatial structure of the mythic cosmos, the object of sacrifice, weapon of death, material of mortal creation, instrument of fate and, finally, source of rebirth after the cosmic destruction. The aim is to observe the transformation of the symbol of the tree both spatially, within the Eddic cycle, and temporally, as the prose accounts drawn from Gylfaginning are believed to be younger than the mythological poems. The abstract concept of the book is developed in relation to the symbol of the tree, and as the thesis progresses the relationship between tree, book and human is developed that ultimately seeks to mobilize the dynamism of such associations. The hopeful outcome undertakes to provide some insight into the human condition. This thesis is also theoretical and two important sources are applied to the poetic subject: the socio-philosophical work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, along with the psychoanalytic interpretations of Carl Gustav Jung. Both of these voices address the symbol of the tree and its significance for the human condition, which, when considered alongside the close analyses of the textual fragments approach what is common to the tree, the book and the human, but also discerns where the three points diverge.
5

Mythic transformations: tree symbolism in the Norse plantation

McGillivray, Andrew 31 March 2011 (has links)
This thesis explores tree symbolism as interpreted from a selection of Old Norse poetic and prose mythological sources. The primary poetic sources include the Eddic poems Vǫluspá, Hávamál, Grímnismál, Vafþrúðnismál, Lokasenna and Baldrs draumur. Selected fragments from these poems are arranged and analyzed with particular attention to the symbol of the tree. Fragments are also selected from Gylfaginning of Snorri’s Edda, and are explored alongside the poetic sources. The focus topics progress from a description of the tree at the beginning of time, as the spatial structure of the mythic cosmos, the object of sacrifice, weapon of death, material of mortal creation, instrument of fate and, finally, source of rebirth after the cosmic destruction. The aim is to observe the transformation of the symbol of the tree both spatially, within the Eddic cycle, and temporally, as the prose accounts drawn from Gylfaginning are believed to be younger than the mythological poems. The abstract concept of the book is developed in relation to the symbol of the tree, and as the thesis progresses the relationship between tree, book and human is developed that ultimately seeks to mobilize the dynamism of such associations. The hopeful outcome undertakes to provide some insight into the human condition. This thesis is also theoretical and two important sources are applied to the poetic subject: the socio-philosophical work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, along with the psychoanalytic interpretations of Carl Gustav Jung. Both of these voices address the symbol of the tree and its significance for the human condition, which, when considered alongside the close analyses of the textual fragments approach what is common to the tree, the book and the human, but also discerns where the three points diverge.
6

The mythological state and its empire

Grant, David John, Law, Faculty of Law, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
legitimate because it is not the persistence of a secularised theological concept. Although it reoccupied mirror-image pre-Enlightenment questions, say regarding absolutism, it is not first concerned with such categories as ???sovereignty, raison d???etat, will, decision, friend-enemy??? but with ???contract, consent, liberty, law and rights???. However, in Work on Myth, he proposes that man is, and has always been, a maker of mythological magnitudes, of which there can be argued to be an archetypal form. These magnitudes are so fearsome as to allow man to convert his existential fear into fear of an entity the fate of which he can gradually bring into his own hands. In this way, there is the promise of the elimination of existential fear and of the experience of sympathetic conditions of existence. Blumenberg does not address political issues, such as the nature of the State. However, if the State can be shown to be such a magnitude and therefore a political realisation of such an archetype, then it is mythological and so is not modern, even if it is legitimate. It then needs to be criticised to allow the introduction of a radical notion of Enlightenment. The effect of such criticisms would be the replacement of the notions of fear and sympathy with that of self-responsibility as the first interest of the State. Selfresponsibility would need to be promoted progressively. It would require a reconfigured State the prime purpose of which is the promotion of respect and self-reliance of individuals. Its first concern would therefore not be the elimination of fear, which would be understood as unable to be eliminated, nor the creation by it of sympathetic conditions of existence, which would be better a matter for properly prepared and supported, selfreliant individuals. The debate then would be around this axis, where contingency is accepted and managed, not the mythological axis of liberalism and republicanism which has dominated modern political theory since Hobbes. This thesis is first an exploration of the viability of the mythological idea of the State, whether the State is a political realisation of the archetypal myth. It does this through an examination of such thinkers in the political tradition as Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Rawls and Pettit. The conclusion of this examination is, in sum, that the idea of the State since Hobbes has been, and remains, mythological since it shows all the key characteristics of a mythological entity and the arguments for it have mythological presumptions. It is still first concerned with the fear/sympathy nexus and the debates of the political tradition from Hobbes to Pettit have been carried out around that axis. Further, this is argued to be an arrangement which promotes dominant interests rather than widespread participation of non-autonomous, self-responsible individuals. But if this notion of the State as a progressively refined and dispersed mythological entity is viable, it cannot have existed only in the minds of those in the political theoretical tradition. We should expect to see evidence of it in the beliefs and practices of individual men and women. It must have been not just a political realisation of the mythological State as an idea, but an embodied notion. This thesis is also an exploration of the evidence for that embodiment. It does this by looking at Elias??? analysis of the civilising process in the Middle Ages, at Foucault???s analysis of the emergence and proliferation of the disciplines and the art of government from the 17th century and at the dispersal of the myth through cultural imperialism in the 18th century. The conclusions of these analyses are reinforced by the social ontology of Wittgenstein. Further argument for this embodiment is presented regarding both the common notion of citizenship and the perception of other cultures, that each manifest mythological characteristics. Such embodied practices can be seen as strategies promoted through the State by dominant interests, the purpose of which are the claims to generally eliminate fear and create sympathetic conditions of existence. This embodiment reinforces the initial argument that the idea of the State did emerge and has been established and gradually refined as mythological. In essence and in large part, this is a genealogy of post-Hobbesian political society as mythological. That is, as the political realisation of the archetypal mythological form and its embodiment in the material practice of individuals. The explanatory value of this way of perceiving the State is then demonstrated by its application to the complex conditions of the destruction of traditional Aboriginal culture by the colonising and civilising British, that is the dispersal of the mythological State as empire. From this, it is argued that the mythological understanding of the State is more illuminating that other approaches.
7

Reading the ancient fable : early modern English mythographers 1590-1650

Hartmann, Anna-Maria Regina January 2012 (has links)
No description available.
8

Myth as a transforming vision: a comparative approach to the roles of myth in Chinese fiction as exemplified byHung-lou meng

陳淸橋, Chan, Ching-kiu, Stephen. January 1981 (has links)
published_or_final_version / English Studies and Comparative Literature / Master / Master of Philosophy
9

The mythological state and its empire

Grant, David John, Law, Faculty of Law, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
legitimate because it is not the persistence of a secularised theological concept. Although it reoccupied mirror-image pre-Enlightenment questions, say regarding absolutism, it is not first concerned with such categories as ???sovereignty, raison d???etat, will, decision, friend-enemy??? but with ???contract, consent, liberty, law and rights???. However, in Work on Myth, he proposes that man is, and has always been, a maker of mythological magnitudes, of which there can be argued to be an archetypal form. These magnitudes are so fearsome as to allow man to convert his existential fear into fear of an entity the fate of which he can gradually bring into his own hands. In this way, there is the promise of the elimination of existential fear and of the experience of sympathetic conditions of existence. Blumenberg does not address political issues, such as the nature of the State. However, if the State can be shown to be such a magnitude and therefore a political realisation of such an archetype, then it is mythological and so is not modern, even if it is legitimate. It then needs to be criticised to allow the introduction of a radical notion of Enlightenment. The effect of such criticisms would be the replacement of the notions of fear and sympathy with that of self-responsibility as the first interest of the State. Selfresponsibility would need to be promoted progressively. It would require a reconfigured State the prime purpose of which is the promotion of respect and self-reliance of individuals. Its first concern would therefore not be the elimination of fear, which would be understood as unable to be eliminated, nor the creation by it of sympathetic conditions of existence, which would be better a matter for properly prepared and supported, selfreliant individuals. The debate then would be around this axis, where contingency is accepted and managed, not the mythological axis of liberalism and republicanism which has dominated modern political theory since Hobbes. This thesis is first an exploration of the viability of the mythological idea of the State, whether the State is a political realisation of the archetypal myth. It does this through an examination of such thinkers in the political tradition as Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Rawls and Pettit. The conclusion of this examination is, in sum, that the idea of the State since Hobbes has been, and remains, mythological since it shows all the key characteristics of a mythological entity and the arguments for it have mythological presumptions. It is still first concerned with the fear/sympathy nexus and the debates of the political tradition from Hobbes to Pettit have been carried out around that axis. Further, this is argued to be an arrangement which promotes dominant interests rather than widespread participation of non-autonomous, self-responsible individuals. But if this notion of the State as a progressively refined and dispersed mythological entity is viable, it cannot have existed only in the minds of those in the political theoretical tradition. We should expect to see evidence of it in the beliefs and practices of individual men and women. It must have been not just a political realisation of the mythological State as an idea, but an embodied notion. This thesis is also an exploration of the evidence for that embodiment. It does this by looking at Elias??? analysis of the civilising process in the Middle Ages, at Foucault???s analysis of the emergence and proliferation of the disciplines and the art of government from the 17th century and at the dispersal of the myth through cultural imperialism in the 18th century. The conclusions of these analyses are reinforced by the social ontology of Wittgenstein. Further argument for this embodiment is presented regarding both the common notion of citizenship and the perception of other cultures, that each manifest mythological characteristics. Such embodied practices can be seen as strategies promoted through the State by dominant interests, the purpose of which are the claims to generally eliminate fear and create sympathetic conditions of existence. This embodiment reinforces the initial argument that the idea of the State did emerge and has been established and gradually refined as mythological. In essence and in large part, this is a genealogy of post-Hobbesian political society as mythological. That is, as the political realisation of the archetypal mythological form and its embodiment in the material practice of individuals. The explanatory value of this way of perceiving the State is then demonstrated by its application to the complex conditions of the destruction of traditional Aboriginal culture by the colonising and civilising British, that is the dispersal of the mythological State as empire. From this, it is argued that the mythological understanding of the State is more illuminating that other approaches.
10

The mythological state and its empire

Grant, David John, Law, Faculty of Law, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
legitimate because it is not the persistence of a secularised theological concept. Although it reoccupied mirror-image pre-Enlightenment questions, say regarding absolutism, it is not first concerned with such categories as ???sovereignty, raison d???etat, will, decision, friend-enemy??? but with ???contract, consent, liberty, law and rights???. However, in Work on Myth, he proposes that man is, and has always been, a maker of mythological magnitudes, of which there can be argued to be an archetypal form. These magnitudes are so fearsome as to allow man to convert his existential fear into fear of an entity the fate of which he can gradually bring into his own hands. In this way, there is the promise of the elimination of existential fear and of the experience of sympathetic conditions of existence. Blumenberg does not address political issues, such as the nature of the State. However, if the State can be shown to be such a magnitude and therefore a political realisation of such an archetype, then it is mythological and so is not modern, even if it is legitimate. It then needs to be criticised to allow the introduction of a radical notion of Enlightenment. The effect of such criticisms would be the replacement of the notions of fear and sympathy with that of self-responsibility as the first interest of the State. Selfresponsibility would need to be promoted progressively. It would require a reconfigured State the prime purpose of which is the promotion of respect and self-reliance of individuals. Its first concern would therefore not be the elimination of fear, which would be understood as unable to be eliminated, nor the creation by it of sympathetic conditions of existence, which would be better a matter for properly prepared and supported, selfreliant individuals. The debate then would be around this axis, where contingency is accepted and managed, not the mythological axis of liberalism and republicanism which has dominated modern political theory since Hobbes. This thesis is first an exploration of the viability of the mythological idea of the State, whether the State is a political realisation of the archetypal myth. It does this through an examination of such thinkers in the political tradition as Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Rawls and Pettit. The conclusion of this examination is, in sum, that the idea of the State since Hobbes has been, and remains, mythological since it shows all the key characteristics of a mythological entity and the arguments for it have mythological presumptions. It is still first concerned with the fear/sympathy nexus and the debates of the political tradition from Hobbes to Pettit have been carried out around that axis. Further, this is argued to be an arrangement which promotes dominant interests rather than widespread participation of non-autonomous, self-responsible individuals. But if this notion of the State as a progressively refined and dispersed mythological entity is viable, it cannot have existed only in the minds of those in the political theoretical tradition. We should expect to see evidence of it in the beliefs and practices of individual men and women. It must have been not just a political realisation of the mythological State as an idea, but an embodied notion. This thesis is also an exploration of the evidence for that embodiment. It does this by looking at Elias??? analysis of the civilising process in the Middle Ages, at Foucault???s analysis of the emergence and proliferation of the disciplines and the art of government from the 17th century and at the dispersal of the myth through cultural imperialism in the 18th century. The conclusions of these analyses are reinforced by the social ontology of Wittgenstein. Further argument for this embodiment is presented regarding both the common notion of citizenship and the perception of other cultures, that each manifest mythological characteristics. Such embodied practices can be seen as strategies promoted through the State by dominant interests, the purpose of which are the claims to generally eliminate fear and create sympathetic conditions of existence. This embodiment reinforces the initial argument that the idea of the State did emerge and has been established and gradually refined as mythological. In essence and in large part, this is a genealogy of post-Hobbesian political society as mythological. That is, as the political realisation of the archetypal mythological form and its embodiment in the material practice of individuals. The explanatory value of this way of perceiving the State is then demonstrated by its application to the complex conditions of the destruction of traditional Aboriginal culture by the colonising and civilising British, that is the dispersal of the mythological State as empire. From this, it is argued that the mythological understanding of the State is more illuminating that other approaches.

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