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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Analysis of non-Newtonian effects in separated blood flow regions

Davis, Paul H. 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
12

Analysis of polymer flows in the three dimensional extrusion dies

Yu, Zuwei. January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Ohio University, November, 1994. / Title from PDF t.p.
13

Non-newtonian loss coefficient for Saunders diaphragm valves /

Kabwe, Aime Mume. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (MTech (Chemical Engineering))--Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 2009. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 139-144).
14

Direct simulations of spherical particle motion in non-Newtonian liquids

Prashant. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Alberta, 2009. / Title from PDF file main screen (viewed on Oct. 21, 2009). "A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta." Includes bibliographical references.
15

Direct simulations of spherical particle motion in non-Newtonian liquids

Prashant. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Alberta, 2009. / Title from PDF file main screen (viewed on Oct. 21, 2009). "A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta." Includes bibliographical references.
16

The viscosity of suspensions of rigid spherical particles in viscoelastic fluids

Riddle, Michael Joseph. January 1977 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves E1-E4).
17

The flow of non-dilute suspensions of gas bubbles in non-Newtonian fluids

Prud'homme, Robert Krafft. January 1978 (has links)
Thesis--University of Wisconsin--Madison. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 218-230).
18

Flow of non-Newtonian fluids in annuli

Fredrickson, Arnold G. January 1959 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin, 1959. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 13-1-13-9).
19

Non-Newtonian losses through diaphragm valves

Kazadi, Dieudonne Matang'a January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (MTech (Chemical Engineering))--Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 2005 / The prediction of head losses in a pipe system is very important because head losses affect the performance of fluid machinery such as pumps. In a pipe system, two kinds of losses are observed: major losses and minor losses. In Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow, major losses are those that are due to friction in straight pipes and minor losses are those that are due to pipe fittings such as contractions, expansions, bends and valves. Minor losses must be accurately predicted in a pipe system because they are not negligible and can sometimes outweigh major losses (Edwards et al., 1985). There is presently little data for the prediction of non-Newtonian head losses in pipe fittings in the literature and little consensus amongst researchers (Pienaar et al., 2004). In the case of diaphragm valves, usually, only one loss coefficient value is given in turbulent flow or in laminar flow with no reference to a specific size of the valve, assuming geometrical similarity that would lead to dynamic similarity. However, no one has done a systematic study of various sizes of diaphragm valves from the same manufacturer to establish if this is true. This could be the main reason for discrepancies found in the literature (Hooper, 1981; Perry & Chilton, 1973; Miller, 1978 and Pienaar et al., 2004). This work addresses this issue. A literature revIew on the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids has been presented. The work of Hooper (1981) on diaphragm valves and the works of Edwards et al., (1985), BaneIjee et aI., (1994) and Turian et al., (1997) for non-Newtonian fluids in globe and gate valves were found to be relevant to this work.
20

Time effects in evolution of structure and rheology of highly concentrated emulsions

Kharatiyan, Ellina January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (DTech (Chemical Engineering))--Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 2005. / The subject of this study is highly concentrated emulsion explosive (HCEE). These emulsions are dispersions of an aqueous phase (up to 90 v-%) in an oil phase. The dispersed droplets consist of an aqueous solution of nitrate salts, which is supersaturated at room temperature, comprising less than 20% of water by mass. Compounds of this kind are thermodynamically unstable and their instability is related to the coarsening of emulsion (coalescence) and phase transition (crystallization) of dispersed phase. However it is demonstrated that the dominating mechanism is slow crystallization inside the super-cooled droplets. The main goal of this thesis is a phenomenological study of the dependence of structural parameters, such as droplet size and volume fraction, as well as the ageing processes, on the rheological properties of these emulsions. The results of the measurements include the flow and viscoelastic properties of the materials. The rheological parameters are correlated with the kinetics of structural changes during ageing, as a function of emulsion formulation. The emulsions under study are non-Newtonian liquids. Experiments in shear rate sweep mode demonstrate that the upward and downward branches of the flow curves coincide above some specific shear rate value. The upward experiments show the existence of a low shear Newtonian asymptote, while the effect of yielding is observed in the downward curve. Wall slip is investigated and shown to be negligible.

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