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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL SUPPORT AND ROLE STRAIN AND PREVENTATIVE HEALTH BEHAVIORS IN CRITICAL CARE NURSES

Whitney, Stuart Luhn January 1987 (has links)
The purpose of the research was to describe the relationships between social support and role strain and preventative health behaviors. The sample consisted of 62 critical care nurses employed in three southwest acute care facilities. Subjects completed instruments measuring social support, role strain, and four preventative health care behaviors. Pearson correlations revealed significant positive relationships between social support and personal/household roles women perform and ways women handle stress. Additional significant negative relationships existed between marital/relationship roles women perform and leisure physical activities, a subset of preventative health behaviors. The parental roles, obligations, and responsibilities women perform were also significantly related with leisure physical activities. Conclusions drawn indicate that the critical care nurses did not perceive themselves susceptible to cardiovascular disease and therefore did not participate in preventative health care activities, regardless of perceived helpful social support and an absence of role strain.
42

Home care clients' perceptions of nursing invasiveness, territorial control, and satisfaction with nursing care

Baker, Kay Stouffer January 1987 (has links)
This descriptive correlational study describes the relationships among 30 home care clients' perceptions of nursing invasiveness, territorial control, and satisfaction with nursing care. The self-report data were collected using a Nursing Invasiveness Scale (NIS), Index of Patient Territorial Control Perceptions (IPTCP), and Patient Satisfaction Instrument (PSI). The subjects were males and females, aged 23 to 93 years, who were receiving home care nursing. Analysis of the data suggests that the subjects perceived a low level of invasiveness by home care nurses, "much control" within their homes (their primary territories), and were highly satisfied with their nursing care. There was a significant negative correlation (r = -0.79) between perceptions of nursing invasiveness and satisfaction with nursing care. The relationships between perceptions of nursing invasiveness and territorial control (r = -0.02) and between perceived territorial control and satisfaction with nursing care (r = 0.14) were not significant.
43

The clinical scholar model: a strategy to bridge the theory-practice gap

Unknown Date (has links)
The purpose of this study was to evaluate student outcomes following implementation of a clinical scholar model of clinical education in one of four placement sites of a college of nursing grounded in a caring philosophy. The question guiding the study was to determine if the clinical scholar model has an influence on student perceptions and outcomes when used with second-degree accelerated BSN students. Watson's Human Caring theory, based on ten caritas processes, serves as the theoretical framework for this study (Watson, 2007). A sequential mixed-methods approach that combined quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques was implemented using a pre-experimental, post-test only design with non-equivalent groups to determine differences between the Traditional Model (TM) and Clinical Scholar Model (CSM) in clinical nursing education... Limitations of this study include low sample size and are partially due to limitations of the class size and low survey participation. Additionally, only CSM students attended a focus group, which prevented comparisons of qualitative feedback between groups. Even with these limitations, CSM students scored as well or better than TM students, indicating that the CSM could be a viable model for nursing clinical education. / by Kathryn Arnold. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2013. / Includes bibliography. / Mode of access: World Wide Web. / System requirements: Adobe Reader.
44

Theatre wear must be worn beyond this point : a hermeneutic ethnographic exploration of operating room nursing

Bull, Rosalind Margaret. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
"September 2002" Includes bibliographical references (leaves 301-318)
45

Theatre wear must be worn beyond this point : a hermeneutic ethnographic exploration of operating room nursing / Rosalind M. Bull.

Bull, Rosalind Margaret January 2002 (has links)
"September 2002" / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 301-318) / viii, 318 leaves : ill. (col.) ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Clinical Nursing, 2003
46

Locus of control and the intensive care nurse's perception of job-related stresses

Childers, Jane Marie 03 June 2011 (has links)
The purpose of this thesis was to examine the relationship between locus of control and the intensive care nurse's perception of job-related situations. It was hypothesized that intensive care nurses who evidenced an external locus of control would classify job-related situations as more stressful, more threatening, and less challenging than intensive care nurses who evidenced an internal locus of control. The instruments consisted of (1) a demographic questionnaire, (2) an instrument developed by this investigator to measure the degree of perceived stressful, threatening, and challenging aspects of certain job-related situations, and (3) Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. The questionnaires were distributed to nurses working in intensive and coronary care units in one medium sized city in Indiana. An N of 75 was obtained.The hypotheses that external intensive care nurses would classify job-related situations as more stressful and more threatening were supported (F = 9.26, p<0.01, and F = 6.08, p<0.01 respectively). The hypothesis that internal nurses would classify more job-related situations as challenging was not supported by the data (F = 0.01, p = 0,91).Ball State UniversityMuncie, IN 47306
47

Transitions in death : the lived experience of critical care nurses

Campbell, Nancy, University of Lethbridge. School of Health Sciences January 2008 (has links)
Critical care nurses often face the ordeal of witnessing a patient's death in a tense and stressful environment. Anecdotal stories shared among nurses reveal that unusual experiences often occur at the time of or after a patient's death. This hermeneutic phenomenological study explored the meaning of these experiences for critical care nurses. Using Parse's research method, in-depth interviews were conducted with six critical care nurses who described their experiences at the time of a patient's death as well as during the post-death period. These experiences brought a sense of peace and comfort to each individual as well as reinforced their individual belief patterns about life after death. A distinctive sense of nursing knowing at the time of death was also identified. The findings of this study indicate that the experiences of the phenomenon of death by critical care nurses have a significant impact on each individual and that further research and understanding of this impact is needed. / ix, 113 leaves ; 29 cm.
48

The development of an intervention model for managing abrupt death trajectories in KwaZulu-Natal level 1 emergency departments.

Brysiewicz, Petra. January 2004 (has links)
AIM: The aim of this research was to describe how the health professionals manage sudden/abrupt deaths in the ED and to foster change in current practice by involving the clients (dead or dying clients and their families) and the health professionals. METHOD: Action research was the approach used in this four year research project, and co-researchers (nurses) from three Level I ED's in KwaZulu-Natal were actively involved in shaping and guiding the project. The participants involved in the research were health professionals, bereaved families and mortuary staff members. FINDINGS: An intervention model, the Dealing with Sudden Death Model, was developed in order to guide the therapeutic management of sudden/abrupt deaths in ED's. Along with this was the development of the family pamphlet, the Preparation Checklist and the Incident Evaluation Checklist. Following the implementation of this model the health professionals emphasized the fact that this model provided guidance and meaning to the care rendered to the dead or dying client, the bereaved families and fellow colleagues. The Dealing with Sudden Death Model had resulted in a production of knowledge and planned changes in the management of sudden/abrupt deaths in the ED's. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2004.
49

Dimensions of sadness - expanding awareness of community nurses' practice in palliative care / Ysanne B. Chapman.

Chapman, Ysanne, 1948- January 1999 (has links)
Bibliography: leaves 252-270. / 275 leaves ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Events of sadness from their daily routine are described by sixteen participants and retold as stories. Inspired by philosophical and methodological ideology situated firmly within the interpretive paradigm, an analysis of these stories is undertaken using an interpretive, hermeneutical lens. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Clinical Nursing, 1999
50

Professional behaviour among nursing students at a college in the Eastern Cape

Magopeni, Sibongile Nomvuyo January 2016 (has links)
The focus of the study was to explore and describe reasons for poor professional behaviour among nursing students at a public nursing college in the Eastern Cape. The objectives of the study were to explore and describe the reasons for poor professional behaviour among nursing students and to describe strategies to improve poor professional behaviour. The study has significance for the college management, staff, nursing students, registered nurses and everyone involved in professional development of nursing students. The population for this study consisted of third-year nursing students following the four-year comprehensive basic course for registration leading to the Diploma in Nursing (General, Community & Psychiatry) and Midwifery at a public nursing college. The research questions were: What do you understand by professional behaviour? What are the reasons for poor professional behaviour among nursing students? What could be done to improve professionalism among college nursing students? A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used as a framework for the study. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the University of Fort Hare ethics committee and other relevant authorities as indicated in the study. Ethical principles were maintained and informed consent obtained. Data collection was done using focus groups and an audiotape with a purposefully sampling of 30 third-year nursing students at the public college of nursing. Data were analysed using Tesch’s method of analysis for qualitative research. Three major themes emerged: students’ understanding of professional behaviour, reasons for poor professional behaviour and methods to improve poor professional behaviour. It was concluded that poor professional behaviour has an effect on professionalism and it should be addressed and corrected for protecting the professional image. Recommendations: Policies regarding inappropriate professional behaviour at the college should be in place and easily accessible to every staff member and nursing student. Department of Health should conduct reflective courses and seminars on professionalism and these should begin at the same time as the academic programme.

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