• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 115
  • 37
  • 26
  • 19
  • 18
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • Tagged with
  • 313
  • 121
  • 101
  • 96
  • 63
  • 55
  • 44
  • 32
  • 29
  • 29
  • 28
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

A visible darkness : The Owl House of Nieu Bethesda.

De Villiers, Marguerite 12 September 2014 (has links)
The idea of rumours as oral history, the appeal of an apparently isolated community, and the social and economic value of small towns in present day South Africa is what attracted me to Nieu Bethesda and the Owl House. My research report is divided into three chapters: economic viability, rumour as oral history, and race relations. I look at what constitutes the Nieu Bethesda brand; how it is formulated, marketed, sold, and received, the manner in which rumours could be seen as historical sources as well as value-producing acts, and the role of race relations in determining who benefits from or is able to capitalise on the tourism generated in Nieu Bethesda. I am not interested in proving or disproving stories, but rather extracting their social value in contributing to the brand identity. Nieu Bethesda is a microcosm that allows us to understand the broader South African context as well as the relationship between ideas of the country and ideas of the city. My fieldwork took place during March, June, July and September of 2013 as well as preliminary fieldwork conducted in November and December of the previous year. The methods used include participantobservation, in-depth interviews, and documentation through photographs.
12

Mitochondrial and nuclear assessment of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium Brasilianum) Phylogrography

Proudfoot, Glenn Arthur 16 August 2006 (has links)
Sequences of the cytochrome b gene and genotypes from 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to assess phylogeographic variation in ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) from Arizona, Mexico, and Texas. Analysis of mtDNA indicated that pygmy-owl populations in Arizona and Texas are unique, with no shared haplotypes. Populations from Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico, were distinct from remaining populations in Mexico and grouped closest to haplotypes in Arizona. Nested clade analysis of mtDNA sequence data indicated past fragmentation separated pygmy-owls into two major groups: 1) Arizona, Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico, and 2) southwestern (Nayarit and Michoacan), south-central (Oaxaca and Chiapas), and eastern Mexico, along the eastern slope of the Sierra Madre Oriental from Texas to Central America. In addition, analysis of mtDNA variation in several species of Glaucidium support the recommendation that populations of G. brasilianum from Mexico, Texas, and Arizona represent a phylogenetically distinct group from populations occurring in South America. The level of separation between the North and South Americanpopulations justifies granting species status (G. ridgwayi) to the North American population. Analysis of distance matrices derived from genotypes of 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci supports restricted gene flow between pygmy-owl populations in Arizona-Sonora and Sinaloa, and Texas-Tamaulipas and the remainder of states in Mexico. The Arizona-Sonora population showed signs of a recent genetic bottleneck, an observation supported by low population estimates for Arizona (13-117 individuals). Heterozygosity in Arizona, however, was equal to levels recorded throughout Mexico and Texas. Congruent patterns revealed by both mtDNA and nuclear DNA (microsatellites) indicate Arizona and Texas populations are distinct subspecies that require the design and implementation of separate management plans for recovery and conservation efforts.
13

Nest structure and breeding habitat characteristics of Barred Owls (Strix varia) in Manitoba, Canada

Whiklo, Todd 30 March 2012 (has links)
Barred Owls were located through audio playback surveying searching in southern Manitoba. Sixty-one confirmed home ranges were located and nine nest sites were located. Mean diameter at breast height and cavity depth and width were determined to be limiting factors governing Barred Owl distribution. Barred Owl habitat use was examined at two scales: immediately around nest trees and within estimated breeding and non-breeding home ranges. Barred Owl breeding and non-breeding home ranges had significantly more hardwood and mixedwood than random plots. Barred Owl breeding season commenced in early March, egg laying in early April, hatching in early May, and fledging at the start of June. Mean and standard deviation of clutch size were 1.91 ± 0.83. Barred Owl diet was determined to be generalist in nature. Dietary breadth was calculated, using Simpson’s formula for measurement of diversity in a sample, of D = 0.1525.
14

Nest structure and breeding habitat characteristics of Barred Owls (Strix varia) in Manitoba, Canada

Whiklo, Todd 30 March 2012 (has links)
Barred Owls were located through audio playback surveying searching in southern Manitoba. Sixty-one confirmed home ranges were located and nine nest sites were located. Mean diameter at breast height and cavity depth and width were determined to be limiting factors governing Barred Owl distribution. Barred Owl habitat use was examined at two scales: immediately around nest trees and within estimated breeding and non-breeding home ranges. Barred Owl breeding and non-breeding home ranges had significantly more hardwood and mixedwood than random plots. Barred Owl breeding season commenced in early March, egg laying in early April, hatching in early May, and fledging at the start of June. Mean and standard deviation of clutch size were 1.91 ± 0.83. Barred Owl diet was determined to be generalist in nature. Dietary breadth was calculated, using Simpson’s formula for measurement of diversity in a sample, of D = 0.1525.
15

Bioacoustic techniques to monitor Great Gray Owls (Strix nebulosa) in the Sierra Nevada /

Rognan, Cameron B. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Humboldt State University, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 60-64). Also available via Humboldt Digital Scholar.
16

Dispersal of juvenile northern spotted owls in western Oregon /

Miller, Gary Scott. January 1989 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 1989. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references. Also available via the World Wide Web.
17

Exposure of the eastern screech-owl to selected contaminants in apple orchards of southern Quebec

Richards, Ngaio L. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc.). / Written for the Dept. of Natural Resource Sciences, Macdonald College. Title from title page of PDF (viewed 2008/07/24). Includes bibliographical references.
18

Demography, home range, and habitat selection of northern spotted owls in the Ashland Watershed /

Schilling, Jason W. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2010. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-92). Also available on the World Wide Web.
19

Nest habitat selection of burrowing owls in relation to soils, burrow availability, and burrow temperature

Larson, Kyle Blake, January 2009 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S. in environmental science)--Washington State University, August 2009. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on Sept. 17, 2009). "School of Earth and Environmental Sciences." Includes bibliographical references (p. 35-42).
20

Great horned owl nestling behavior /

Wink, Judy. January 1985 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, 1985. / Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 45-06, page: 3047. Typescript. Abstract precedes thesis as preliminary leaves [1-2] Includes bibliographical references (leaves 64-66).

Page generated in 0.0473 seconds