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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Monitoring the use of chair backrest and forearm support during computer work with and without a workplace Butterfly board attachment

EL-SAGHEIR, SOHAILA 19 May 2009 (has links)
In this thesis, a new method is proposed for monitoring the use of backrest and forearm support during computer work on a standard workstation and the same workstation with a Butterfly board attachment. The developed techniques measure the effect of using the Butterfly board on the resting duration and the pressure on the back and forearms while resting. Novel™ pressure sensor mats were used to measure pressure applied by resting against the chair back rest and the arm rests. To ensure that the back mat is not moving, a new technique of mapping the back points of contact with the backrest is used. A video camera, synchronized with the pressure measurement system, is used to identify the location where the forearms were resting (work surface or chair arm rests). / Thesis (Master, Mechanical and Materials Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2009-05-14 17:02:19.36
2

Assessment of the impact of large CRTs and flat panel monitors on productivity and quality in an insurance company

Johnson, Michael Federico 12 April 2006 (has links)
This field study evaluates the impact of replacing existing 17-inch Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors with 19 and 21-inch CRT monitors and 18.1-inch Flat Panel Displays (FPDs) on matrices of productivity, visual comfort, and physical discomfort among 30 employees within a large insurance company (Policy Service and Claims). Metrics were analyzed over a five (5) month period. During Phase One (initial eight weeks) of the study, metrics were gathered weekly on 17-inch CRT monitors to establish a baseline of data on productivity, visual comfort and physical discomfort. During Phase Two (12 weeks), each subject used the 19-inch CRT, 21-inch CRT and 18.1-inch FPD for two weeks, respectively interspersed with other subjects in the study utilizing 17-inch monitors for the same time period. Initially, it appears that the 19-inch monitor enables users to enter more keystrokes per hour ( x19 =1894) than its 17-inch counterpart ( x17=1721) which would be a productivity enhancement. However, this value is not statistically significant (p>0.34). Analysis of additional performance metrics yielded similar results (p>0.2). The users’ level of visual comfort increased with all test display units over their existing 17-inch counterpart (p<0.023), but the data was not meaningful due to the minute difference between their mean values (&#8710;<0.75). Physical discomfort metrics were analyzed among all of the monitor treatments. Most employees were relatively comfortable through the duration of the study. Mean values across all physical discomfort metrics measured were less than one on a Borg scale of zero to ten, but none of the values among treatments were significant (p>0.31). Anecdotally, the users preferred the larger monitors.
3

ARE THE NEEDS AND CONCERNS OF COMPUTER USERS AS IDENTIFIED THROUGH A PARTICIPATORY ERGONOMIC APPROACH REFLECTED IN THE CONTENT OF A TYPICAL OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY OFFICE ERGONOMIC EDUCATIONAL PRESENTATION?

Phillips, Jill 09 August 2012 (has links)
Using a participatory ergonomic approach, this research explored if the self-identified needs and concerns of computer users are reflected in a typical occupational therapy office ergonomic educational presentation. While the study confirmed that generally the needs of computer users are met, the topics that the participants found to be most relevant were workstation layout and equipment adjustment. This study also revealed that knowledge transfer/translation is an important factor and that clinicians should consider involving clients at the initial development phase of client educational information. The study participants preferred ergonomic information to be communicated in a brief manner, emphasizing action-oriented information and avoiding medical references. They wanted client information to employ humour, colour and lots of “pizzazz.” The manner in which clinical information is communicated to clients is vital for effective client education.

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