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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An examination of the influences of the captive environment on activity in orangutans

Perkins, Lorraine Allison 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
2

Genetic analysis of social structure, mate choice, and reproductive success in the endangered wild orang-utans of Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan, Republic of Indonesia

Banes, Graham L. January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
3

Post-occupancy Evaluation at the Zoo: Behavioral and Hormonal Indicators of Welfare in Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii)

Tingey, Leigha 01 January 2012 (has links)
An increased understanding of species-specific behavioral needs has lead zoos to focus on providing more naturalistic and stimulating environments. Scientific assessments of how changes in habitat affect animal behavior are necessary in improving overall animal welfare. This study examined the move of three orangutans housed at the Oregon Zoo into a new and innovative exhibit. Post-occupancy evaluation (POE), which offers systematic information regarding the success or failure of the built environment (Maple & Finlay, 1987), was utilized to effectively evaluate the results of the move. The collection of behavioral data and adrenal activity monitoring through collection of non-invasive saliva, urine and hair provided a comprehensive methodology for comparing changes in behavior and physiological functioning. Behavioral results showed that following the move to the new enclosure animals spent less time inactive, more time at higher elevations and utilized exhibit structures at a greater frequency. Hormonal results suggest that detection of cortisol in orangutan hair could be a useful tool for monitoring chronic stress.
4

Gestural communication in orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii) : a cognitive approach

Cartmill, Erica A. January 2009 (has links)
While most human language is expressed verbally, the gestures produced concurrent to speech provide additional information, help listeners interpret meaning, and provide insight into the cognitive processes of the speaker. Several theories have suggested that gesture played an important, possibly central, role in the evolution of language. Great apes have been shown to use gestures flexibly in different situations and to modify their gestures in response to changing contexts. However, it has not previously been determined whether ape gestures are defined by structural variables, carry meaning, are used to intentionally communicate specific information to others, or can be used strategically to overcome miscommunication. To investigate these questions, I studied three captive populations of orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus and P. abelii) in European zoos for 10 months. Sixty-four different gestures, defined through similarities in structure and use, were included in the study after meeting strict criteria for intentional usage. More than half of the gesture types were found to coincide frequently with specific goals of signallers, and were accordingly identified as having meanings. Both structural and social variables were found to determine gesture meaning. The recipient’s gaze in both the present and the past, and the recipient’s apparent understanding of the signaller’s gestures, affected the strategies orangutans employed in their attempts to communicate when confronted with different types of communicative failure (e.g. not seeing, ignoring, misunderstanding, or rejecting a gesture). Maternal influence affected the object-directed behaviour and gestures of infants, who shared more gestures with their mothers than with other females. These findings demonstrate that gesture can be used as a medium to investigate not only the communication but also the cognition of great apes, and indicate that orangutans are more sensitive to the perceptions and knowledge states of others than previously thought.

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