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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Study of a Turn of the 20th Century Skeletal Collection from Memphis, TN

Davis, Stephen Michael 06 May 2017 (has links)
This thesis is a comparative and descriptive study of a turn of the 20th century human commingled skeletal collection from Memphis, TN. The Memphis Regional Forensic Center (MRFC) collection is over four hundred elements recovered in various states of fragmentation. This study focused primarily on the occurrence and prevalence of anatomical cutting and osteoarthritis of the MRFC collection in comparison to contemporary osteological samples to provide insight into a subset of people living in late 19th/early 20th century Memphis, TN. In the framework of biocultural theory, it was discovered that the MRFC collection likely represented individuals subjected to “structural violence” through medical dissection. An analysis of the Shelby County mortality records also appears to support this possibility. Finally, based on osteoarthritis prevalence, it was inconclusive whether or not the collection represented a more urban or rural population.
2

An osteological and historical examination of the Presbyterian Forest Centre Cemetery, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

Rudolph, Lisa Marie 21 September 2010
On October 7th, 2004, construction of the Saskatchewan Forest Centre Building in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan was temporarily halted due to the exposure of human remains from within the soil matrix. Subsequent archaeological investigation revealed the presence of numerous rectangular soil stains suggesting the presence of additional interments within the construction site. The remains of two individuals were recovered during this original construction exposure. The following spring, Western Heritage Services, Inc., in coordination with the Department of Archaeology, University of Saskatchewan, conducted an extensive excavation at the site which unearthed 19 individuals of different racial affiliation, sex, and age. Interment location and an extensive document and literature review suggest that this was the cemetery established by Rev. James Nisbet, founder of the Prince Albert mission. This mission would evolve into the City of Prince Albert. The historic significance and sensitive nature of the site required the involvement of several interest groups including the Heritage Resource Branch of the Department of Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation, the Prince Albert Historical Society, and above all, St. Pauls Presbyterian Church which was responsible for the reinterment of the Forest Centre individuals and was an indispensable source of information. Prior to reinterment, a fundamental osteological and paleopathological examination was conducted for each of the 21 individuals. Coordination and completion of cultural material analysis was performed by Amanda Boechler, an undergraduate archaeology student of the University of Saskatchewan and Mark MacKenzie of the Western Development Museum. Preliminary results may be found within the final site report issued by Western Heritage Services, Inc. dated November, 2005.
3

An osteological and historical examination of the Presbyterian Forest Centre Cemetery, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

Rudolph, Lisa Marie 21 September 2010 (has links)
On October 7th, 2004, construction of the Saskatchewan Forest Centre Building in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan was temporarily halted due to the exposure of human remains from within the soil matrix. Subsequent archaeological investigation revealed the presence of numerous rectangular soil stains suggesting the presence of additional interments within the construction site. The remains of two individuals were recovered during this original construction exposure. The following spring, Western Heritage Services, Inc., in coordination with the Department of Archaeology, University of Saskatchewan, conducted an extensive excavation at the site which unearthed 19 individuals of different racial affiliation, sex, and age. Interment location and an extensive document and literature review suggest that this was the cemetery established by Rev. James Nisbet, founder of the Prince Albert mission. This mission would evolve into the City of Prince Albert. The historic significance and sensitive nature of the site required the involvement of several interest groups including the Heritage Resource Branch of the Department of Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation, the Prince Albert Historical Society, and above all, St. Pauls Presbyterian Church which was responsible for the reinterment of the Forest Centre individuals and was an indispensable source of information. Prior to reinterment, a fundamental osteological and paleopathological examination was conducted for each of the 21 individuals. Coordination and completion of cultural material analysis was performed by Amanda Boechler, an undergraduate archaeology student of the University of Saskatchewan and Mark MacKenzie of the Western Development Museum. Preliminary results may be found within the final site report issued by Western Heritage Services, Inc. dated November, 2005.
4

An osteological and historical examination of the Presbyterian Forest Centre Cemetery, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

08 1900 (has links)
On October 7th, 2004, construction of the Saskatchewan Forest Centre Building in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan was temporarily halted due to the exposure of human remains from within the soil matrix. Subsequent archaeological investigation revealed the presence of numerous rectangular soil stains suggesting the presence of additional interments within the construction site. The remains of two individuals were recovered during this original construction exposure. The following spring, Western Heritage Services, Inc., in coordination with the Department of Archaeology, University of Saskatchewan, conducted an extensive excavation at the site which unearthed 19 individuals of different racial affiliation, sex, and age. Interment location and an extensive document and literature review suggest that this was the cemetery established by Rev. James Nisbet, founder of the Prince Albert mission. This mission would evolve into the City of Prince Albert. The historic significance and sensitive nature of the site required the involvement of several interest groups including the Heritage Resource Branch of the Department of Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation, the Prince Albert Historical Society, and above all, St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church which was responsible for the reinterment of the Forest Centre individuals and was an indispensable source of information. Prior to reinterment, a fundamental osteological and paleopathological examination was conducted for each of the 21 individuals. Coordination and completion of cultural material analysis was performed by Amanda Boechler, an undergraduate archaeology student of the University of Saskatchewan and Mark MacKenzie of the Western Development Museum. Preliminary results may be found within the final site report issued by Western Heritage Services, Inc. dated November, 2005.
5

Survey of Comparative Human and Non-human Osteology: Common Florida Species

Dewey, Jennifer 01 December 2013 (has links)
Forensic anthropologists are tasked with the responsibility of identifying human remains in a forensic context. This includes differentiating between human and non-human osteological remains, and further determining a species-specific identification when presented with nonhuman material. Previous research has provided manuals that are typically limited to one class of animal and includes either photographs or descriptions of cranial or post-cranial skeletal elements. Further, the available resources generally cover a limited number of species from Florida#s diverse habitat. Therefore, the intent of this thesis was to compile a comprehensive comparative osteological guide of local Florida species that addressed both cranial and postcranial skeletal elements. The first aspect of this research was to identify the most common Florida species typically analyzed in a medicolegal context. At the same time, represented examples were identified at the class level for birds, reptiles, and marine mammals. Next, the analysis consisted of detailed photographic documentation of cranial and post-cranial skeletal elements at three collections. The Anthropology Department teaching lab at UCF and the Biology Department Vertebrate Collection at UCF as well as the University of Florida#s Zooarchaeology Comparative Collection. The images were then edited to highlight the most diagnostic features exhibited among the different taxonomic families. These results were then complied into a series of guidelines to aid in a family and species-specific identification to be used during an investigation when presented with a whole skeleton, a single skeletal element, or fragmentary remains.
6

An osteological documentation of hybrid wildebeest and its bearing on black wildebeest (Connochaetes Gnou) evolution

De Klerk, Bonita 14 May 2008 (has links)
ABSTRACT Wildebeest are part of the sub family Alcelaphinae and the genus Connochaetes. There are two extant species of wildebeest namely Connochaetes gnou (black wildebeest) and Connochaetes taurinus (blue wildebeest). From fossil evidence, it is thought that co-generic blue and black wildebeest diverged ca. 1Ma. Historically, geographic ranges of these two species have overlapped, but different social behaviour and habitat preference prevented sexual interaction. It has been proposed that reproductive isolation between C. taurinus and C. gnou may have disappeared due to artificial management. This has caused mate choice to change in the absence of species-specific mates, resulting in hybridisation. Most documented cases of hybridisation have occurred from dispersing blue wildebeest bulls introgressing into black herds however, the opposite has been observed. Genetic studies on a population where the blue males have introgressed with black females, show that the blue wildebeest populations are “pure” and that the black wildebeest populations are receiving an influx of blue alleles. In this research, 14 skeletons of modern hybrid Connochaetes taurinus and Connochaetes gnou, from more than one post-hybridisation generation from the Spioenkop reserve, were morphologically as well as metrically compared with a sample of ten modern “pure” blue and 15 black wildebeest. This project showed that univariate, bivariate statistical analyses of selected measurements of the skeletons were successful in identifying all of the Spioenkop individuals as hybrids. Morphologically, the hybrids exhibit a general increase in body size, and have unusual horns. The auditory bullae of the Spioenkop specimens are highly deformed, as are some axes. There is unusual bone growth on most of the post crania, morphological differences are observed on the distal ends of the metapodials, and the radius and ulna are fused in many specimens.
7

A qualitative and quantitative investigation of the functional morphology of the juvenile scapula

O'Malley, Andrew Stephen January 2013 (has links)
This thesis presents a radiographic description of developmental morphology of the human scapula and a comprehensive morphological description of trabecular bone in the perinatal scapula. While the aim was originally to describe the changing trabecular morphology in the developing scapula, considerable thought has gone into the design, advancement and validity of the methodologies presented in this thesis. The work of previous studies has been considered and improved upon to take into account recent advances in software and hardware. Specifically, the introduction of MPR to the methodology has resulted in a more efficient and reliable technique that could allow future researchers to examine larger datasets in shorter periods of time. Additional anthropometric data were also gathered on the perinatal scapula, which was used to assist in the design of the multiplanar stereoscopic analysis. User error associated with threshold definition and VOI placement was also investigated and found to be negligible. With respect to development of the juvenile scapula, three distinct developmental phases, comprising eight separate groups, were identified from the radiographic study and anthropometric review study: pre-reboot (<0.5y), reboot (0.5-3y) and post-reboot (>3y). A clear pattern of regional organisation was visible at the earliest stages of development, echoing the findings of previous studies. It was suggested that the reboot phase represents a developmental period in which the scapula undergoes functional change under a two-tier mechanism, which influences its overall development. On one level the scapula appears constrained by a rigid template that controls macro- morphology in preparation for phylogenetically anticipated demands, which may, or may not, materialise; on a second tier is the adaptive micro-architecture that initially compliments the phylogenetic template, but retains the flexibility to respond to shifting ontogenetic demands. The trabecular architecture of the pre-reboot specimens was subsequently analysed in quantitative detail. A progressive radiating pattern, which originated from the approximate location of the primary ossification centre, was identified; it is suggested that a combination of radiating growth and internal vascular distribution are significant contributors to this pattern. This thesis provides a detailed account of the developmental morphology of the human scapula and contributes new elements to the evolving methodologies used in this field. The findings of this study also lay the foundation for further investigation of the radiating pattern of ossification and the potential for micro-architecture in developing bone to adapt to ontogenetic demands despite gross morphology that is phylogenetically constrained.
8

Unraveling a thirty-five-year-old mystery : forensic archaeology, eighteenth-century Quakers and Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

ZeRuth, Chelsey M. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (Department Honors) - Franklin & Marshall College, 2009. / Double click the URL for full text access. Includes bibliography pgs. 41-45.
9

Storgravsprojektet : osteologiska analyser av yngre järnålderns benrika brandgravar

Sten, Sabine, Vretemark, Maria January 1988 (has links)
The authors have carried out osteological analyses on 14 cremation graves which are extremely rich in bones. The analysed Late Iron Age graves are concentrated to the Lake Mälaren valley. The resulta show tha) a great number ol animals were sacrificed on lhe funeral pyres in honour of the dead. The animals include trained falcons and bawks. They reveal that falconry already in the 6th century was pracliced by the wealthy class.
10

Partnerships for empowerment in a post-Soviet society patients rights and responsibilities in Uzbekistan /

Pavin, Melinda January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (PH.D.) -- Syracuse University, 2007. / "Publication number AAT 3266313"

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