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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Glandular differences and communication of rank among females in a dominance hierarchy of Polistes fuscatus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)

Downing, Holly Adelaide. January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1982. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 108-117).
2

The behavioural ecology of strepsipteran parasites of Polistes wasps

Hughes, David January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
3

A study of factors affecting queen survival, nest initiation, and nest development in the baldfaced hornet Dolichovespula maculata (L.) (Hymenoptera:Vespidae)

Stein, Kenneth John 13 October 2005 (has links)
Ph. D.
4

Finding the Way Back Home : A study of Spatial Orientation, Navigation and Homing Behaviour in the Social Wasp Ropalidia marginata

Mandal, Souvik January 2017 (has links) (PDF)
For most of the animals, if not all, finding their way to a particular place is crucial for survival. To address this challenge of way-finding, different animals have evolved with different homing strategies. Social hymenopterans like honey bees, ants and wasps are of special interest – foragers of these insects show excellent homing capabilities while having simple neural resources. In this study field, honey bees and ants (desert ants, in particular) are among the most studied animals. Compared to these insects, our understanding on the homing mechanisms of social wasp is rather poor. For my thesis, I have studied homing behaviour of the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata, a predator in their foraging habit. To begin with, first I had to know their typical foraging range, which I found to be within about 500 m from their nest. Forager wasps possess a surprisingly well-developed familiarity with their foraging landscape, apparently more intricate than honey bees and desert ants. They acquire this spatial familiarity through flying around the landscape before starting foraging for food. Compared to honey bees and desert ants, this learning period in wasps appears to be much longer – this can be attributed to the much higher density of the tropical landscape in which they have evolved. I have also found that, if needed, they can fly to a distance of about 1.5 km for foraging and can return to their nest even if passively displaced to familiar and unfamiliar places. To return from unfamiliar places, they probably use some sort of searching mechanisms – a skill that they improve with their age. Such searching behaviour is prevalent throughout other hymenopteran insects. I conclude that capability and mechanisms of spatial orientation, navigation and homing in animals are much influenced by their evolutionary origin and the environment in which they have evolved.

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