• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 2
  • Tagged with
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The petrology of the Khale dolerite sheet

Eales, Hugh V January 1953 (has links)
In the hills and in the plain of the Khale area are exposed two sheets of quartz-dolerite, the upper sheet being locally mushroom-shaped. The rock corresponds loosely with the Downes mountain type of dolorite, and contains numerous horizons of coarse-grained dolorite-pegmatite. The plagioclase felspars are described with special reference to the variation of grain-size, the features of zoned crystals, and the possible causes of a peculiar brown clouding in the basic zones of the crystals. Phenocrysts of augite and pigeonite, as well as plagioclase are recorded in the chilled contact rock. The micrometric data indicate that the mineral composition of the specimens is largely governed by the oxidation state of the iron, and that the Soret effect has caused the marginal rock to be enriched in basic elements. Hydrothermal veinlets composed largely of chlorite occur in both the dolorite and the country rock, and evidence suggests that veins of both residual material and mobilised granite occur in the upper finer-grained dolorite.
2

Cross-border correlation of the Damara Belt in Namibia and equivalent lithologies in northwestern Botswana from potential field and magnetotelluric interpretations

Rankin, William January 2015 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of Science, University of Witwatersrand in the fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. Johannesburg, 2015. / Northwest Botswana holds a key position for the correlation of the Pan-African mobile belts of southern Africa (i.e. the Damara-Zambezi-Lufilian Orogeny). Phanerozoic cover (Kalahari Group) precludes direct correlation between Proterozoic lithologies of the Damara Belt and thick metasedimentary sequences of northwest Botswana. A combination of new geological and geophysical field observations, interpretation of 50 m resolution aeromagnetic data, and 2.2 km resolution gravity data of Namibia and Botswana, have led to the development of a new sub- Kalahari geological map of the Damara Belt and northwest Botswana. The interpretation of potential field and magnetotelluric (MT) data complemented with both new and published geological data, has improved the identification of the northern and southern margins of the Damara Belt and northwest Botswana, and tectonostratigraphic zones within them. In addition, these correlations have established that the northern margin of the Kalahari Craton on geological maps extends further north than previously noted. The northeast trending Damara Belt is confidently traced into northwest Botswana (Ngamiland) to ~19.5°S, 22.0°E. At this location, in map view, aeromagnetically interpreted structures follow a radial distribution from northwest-striking in the west to northeast-striking in the east. The lithostratigraphic units to the north of this location cannot be confidently correlated with lithostratigraphic units of the Damara Belt. Instead, these units are better correlated with lithostratigraphic units in southern Angola and/or Zambia. The southeastern margin of the Damara Belt is in tectonic contact with the northern margin of the Ghanzi-Chobe Belt as identified in the aeromagnetic images. The Ghanzi-Chobe Belt is correlated with the Sinclair Supergroup in the Rehoboth Subprovince in Namibia. The basal Kgwebe volcanics are correlated with the Oorlogsende Porphyry Member and Langberg Formation and the unconformably overlying metasediments of the Ghanzi Group are correlated with the metasediments of the Tsumis Group. The correlations are based on similar aeromagnetic signatures, lithologies, mineralisation and age dates constrained by carbon isotope chemostratigraphy. Physical property measurements were collected on Meso- to Neoproterozoic lithologies of the Damara Belt, northwest Botswana and Zambia. The measurements included hand held magnetic susceptibility measurements on 303 samples and density measurements on 174 samples. The measurements provide one of the largest physical property databases for Namibia, Botswana and Zambia. In general, the sedimentary units have the lowest magnetic susceptibility values of ~0.207 x 10-3 SI units, respectively. The exceptions are the iron formation and diamictite of the Chuos Formation and conglomerate of the Naauwpoort Formation of 15.2 x 10-3 SI units. The iron iii formation ranges in magnetic susceptibility from 3.34 x 10-3 SI units to 92.0 x 10-3 SI units and the diamictite has a magnetic susceptibility of 7.68 x 10-3 SI units. The igneous lithologies have a density and magnetic susceptibility range from 2.58 g.cm-3 to 3.26 g.cm-3 and 0.001 x 10-3 SI units to 11.6 x 10-3 SI units, respectively. The lower values are associated with pegmatites and rhyolites and the higher values are associated with mafic lithologies and magnetite bearing granites (Omangambo, Salem, Sorris-Sorris and Red Granites). The metamorphic lithologies have the widest range of density and magnetic susceptibility values, between 2.61 g.cm-3 and 3.37 g.cm-3, and -0.299 x 10-3 SI units and 49.5 x 10-3 SI units, respectively. The lower values are associated with low grade metamorphic facies of sedimentary origin, and the higher values are associated with high-grade metamorphic facies of an igneous origin. The first upper crustal-scale interpretation of the Southern African MagnetoTelluric EXperiment (SAMTEX) was developed. The results were derived from 1D Occam inversion models, at depth intervals of 1 – 5 km, 1 – 15 km and 1 – 35 km. The MT data were acquired across the semiparallel, north-south striking DMB, NEN and OKA-CAM profiles in the vicinity of the Namibia – Botswana border between 2006 and 2009. Beneath the MT profiles are two zones of enhanced conductivity, a northern and southern zone. The enhanced conductivity of the northern zone (> 100 Ωm) is associated with individual geological bodies. The southern zone forms an elongated belt of enhanced conductivity (> 300 Ωm) at a depth of less than 5 km. This zone of enhanced conductivity is associated with Proterozoic plate boundaries and subduction zones. Three ~350 km long, north-south trending magnetic profiles were 2D forward modelled to investigate the proposed northward subduction of oceanic crust and subsequently a portion of the Kalahari Plate beneath the Congo Craton. Additionally, the folding pattern of the Ghanzi- Chobe Belt was developed. The interpretation of the magnetic models suggests a northward subduction is a possible cause for the evolution of the Damara Orogen with the regionally eastwest striking negative aeromagnetic anomaly, in northern Namibia, being caused by a thick package (~12 km to 20 km) of metasediments with a modelled magnetic susceptibility of 0. 829 x 10-3 SI units. The Damara Orogen has passed through the subduction-collisional transition but did not evolve into a large-hot orogen. Evidence suggests that the Damara Orogen has gone through the transition of subduction of oceanic crust to terrane accretion (speculated to be represented by the Deep-Level Southern Zone and Chihabadum Complex) and continental collision. However, the doubly vergent wedges did not evolve into an orogenic plateau completing the transition from a small-cold orogen to a large-hot orogen. This is similarly observed in the Alps Orogeny.

Page generated in 0.0647 seconds