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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An exploration of the pharmacist-patient communicative relationship

Gade, Carmin Jane, January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2003. / Title from first page of PDF file. Document formatted into pages; contains xii, 123 p.; also includes graphics (some col.). Includes abstract and vita. Advisor: Donald J. Cigala, Dept. of Communication. Includes bibliographical references (p. 117-123).
2

Profiling the re-users and non re-users of the pharmaceutical care service in Singapore /

Das, Sucharita. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2001.
3

Exploring the communication skills of community pharmacists in the Nelson Mandela Metropole

Knoesen, Brent Claud January 2015 (has links)
Pharmacy is an information-driven profession that requires effective face-to-face pharmacist-client communication. With the addition of corporate community pharmacies to traditional independent community pharmacies in South Africa (SA), new challenges may hamper pharmacist-client interactions. This study aimed to identify, adapt and improve the communication skills pharmacists require for a changing community pharmacy environment. Specific objectives were to identify basic communication skills, to evaluate the use of these skills by community pharmacists in the Nelson Mandela Metropole (NMM), to identify communication barriers, and to identify any differences in pharmacist-client communication in the two community pharmacy sectors. A mixed methods research design was implemented. The empirical activities consisted of three client focus groups (17 citizens from the NMM), a client survey (220 clients visiting seven independent and seven corporate community pharmacies in the NMM), a pseudo-client study (the same 14 community pharmacies in NMM), and a Delphi study. Twenty-one pharmacists from the 14 community pharmacies participated in Phase one of the Delphi study; nine academic pharmacists from five pharmacy departments/schools/faculties in SA participated in Phase two. Various qualitative and quantitative techniques were used to analyse and interpret the results. Results indicated that clients consult on many occasions with community pharmacists. Community and academic pharmacists listed listening and nonverbal skills as most important communication skills to ensure effective pharmacist-client communication. Counselling privacy and language barriers were listed as major problems influencing the interaction. The results obtained allowed the researcher to propose a practical communication model to assist future community pharmacists in communication skills training
4

Pharmacists' perceptions of their role in outpatient drug therapy counseling /

Kirking, Duane M. January 1980 (has links)
No description available.
5

From medicines supplier to patient care practitioner implementation and evaluation of two practice models in Australian community practices

March, Geoffrey John January 2005 (has links)
The Australian health system is undergoing substantial changes in response to consumer demands, rising health costs and consequent shifts in government policies. This thesis explored ways community pharmacists could implement new styles of practice. Results indicate that pharmacists can assist consumers to better manage their medications and reduce harm, but it requires a different practice approach to that currently offered. This research has contributed to the establishment of the nation program, Home Medications Review. / thesis (PhDPharmacy)--University of South Australia, 2005.
6

From medicines supplier to patient care practitioner :

March, Geoffrey John. Unknown Date (has links)
The Australian health system is undergoing substantial changes in response to consumer demands, rising health costs and consequent shifts in government policies. This thesis explored ways community pharmacists could implement new styles of practice. Results indicate that pharmacists can assist consumers to better manage their medications and reduce harm, but it requires a different practice approach to that currently offered. This research has contributed to the establishment of the nation program, Home Medications Review. / Thesis (PhDPharmacy)--University of South Australia, 2005.
7

From medicines supplier to patient care practitioner implementation and evaluation of two practice models in Australian community practices

March, Geoffrey John January 2005 (has links)
The Australian health system is undergoing substantial changes in response to consumer demands, rising health costs and consequent shifts in government policies. This thesis explored ways community pharmacists could implement new styles of practice. Results indicate that pharmacists can assist consumers to better manage their medications and reduce harm, but it requires a different practice approach to that currently offered. This research has contributed to the establishment of the nation program, Home Medications Review. / thesis (PhDPharmacy)--University of South Australia, 2005.
8

Patient counseling and satisfaction/dissatisfaction with prescription medication.

Cady, Paul Stevens. January 1988 (has links)
This study was undertaken to test the satisfaction process as it relates to the consumption of prescription medication. The disconfirmation of expectations model was used as a framework for the study. The study sought to evaluate the impact the provision of drug information has on the satisfaction/dissatisfaction process. To accomplish this, consumers recruited from two community pharmacies were provided with a scenario that described the purchase, and consequences of taking a prescription product intended for the treatment of migraine headache. Each subject received a scenario that contained one of four (4) levels of drug information. The four levels were: (1) no drug information; (2) information about side effects; (3) information about effectiveness; and (4) information about effectiveness and side effects. Each subject also received a scenario that described one of four therapeutic outcomes. They were: (1) no side effects with total elimination of headaches; (2) no side effects with partial elimination of headaches; (3) side effects with total elimination of headaches; and (4) side effects with partial elimination of headaches. The disconfirmation of expectation model was supported by the study. Using an ANOVA model, analyses revealed that the provision of drug information resulted in more positive disconfirmation and higher levels of satisfaction when the outcome of therapy was less than optimal. The measures of future intention were also affected by the provision of drug information. Further analyses revealed satisfaction was a function of expectation and disconfirmation.
9

The pharmacist's role in preventing medication errors made by the cardiac and hyperlipoproteinemic outpatients

Chubb, James Michael, 1947- January 1973 (has links)
No description available.
10

Pharmacist-client communication : a study of quality and client satisfaction

Paluck, Elan Carla Marie 11 1900 (has links)
OBJECTIVE OF STUDY: The objective of the study was to examine the quality of interactions occurring between pharmacists and clients, the facilitators and barriers shaping the way pharmacists communicate with clients, and the use of client satisfaction ratings as an outcome measure for pharmacist-client communication. METHODS AND MEASURES: Verbal exchanges between consenting pharmacists (n=100) and clients (n=786) were audio-recorded during four-hour, on-site, observation periods. Clients rated their interaction with the pharmacist using an 11-item Client Satisfaction Rating instrument, while pharmacists completed a questionnaire examining the factors predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing their communication with clients. Subsequent to data collection, an expert panel listened to the audiotapes and rated the quality of the interactions using a 9-item Quality of Communication rating scale. FINDINGS: The mean overall expert rating for the pharmacist-client interactions was 4.0 (out of 7), and represented a "satisfactory" rating. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that the predisposing, enabling and reinforcing variables measured in the Pharmacists' Questionnaire accounted for 19% of the variance in pharmacists' technical quality scores. Client satisfaction ratings and expert ratings of communication quality were modestly correlated (r=0.14; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: While the 60% of consultations in this study met or exceeded the mandated communication requirements of pharmacy practice, pharmacists were uniformly weakest in their client assessment skills and in their discussions of medication precautions and non-pharmacologic approaches to symptom management. Most pharmacists in the study reported being highly predisposed to communicating with their clients, but many lacked the reinforcing factors, and to a lesser degree, enabling factors that are considered necessary to sustain quality communication in the workplace. Client satisfaction ratings were positively skewed with little variability, making it difficult to detect a relationship between the expert and client ratings. Reasons why the study was unable to capture more of the variance in its proposed relationships are provided, as well as areas for future research. KEY WORDS: pharmacist-client communication, client satisfaction, quality

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