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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Epidemiology of Physical Activity in Canada

BRYAN, SHIRLEY 22 June 2009 (has links)
The four studies of this thesis provide an overview of the epidemiology of physical activity in Canada. In the first study two methods of coding activities used in estimating leisure-time physical activity energy expenditure (LTPAEE), from a questionnaire including 21 specific activities, and up to three “other” activities were compared. The authors assessed whether the assignment of activity intensity for “other” activities has an effect on LTPAEE and the classification of respondents as physically active versus inactive. The results indicate that the population classification of activity level is not affected by the intensity code; however, individual level LTPAEE is under-estimated from light and vigorous activities and over-estimated from moderate activities using the current method. In study two the proportion of Canadians meeting Canada’s physical activity guidelines for moderate and vigorous activities was estimated. The prevalence of adults reporting no activity has not changed since 1994/95 and the prevalence of meeting the guidelines has increased by about 11%. Men, younger adults, those with higher income and lower body mass index (BMI) meet the guidelines more often than their peers. The epidemiology of walking among Canadians between 1994 and 2007 was assessed in the third study. Walking was the most popular activity, regardless of age, sex, BMI or income group; however, only 30% of walkers walked regularly. Women, older adults, those with lower BMI and lower household income walk regularly more often than their counterparts. Women, older adults and lower income Canadians tended to derive 100% of their total LTPAEE from walking. An evaluation of whether meeting the guidelines for physical activity was associated with lower odds of chronic conditions and reporting fair/poor health was undertaken in study four. After adjustment for covariates, the odds of type 2 diabetes, obesity and reporting fair/poor health were significantly higher among those not meeting the guidelines for both sexes and for high blood pressure among women. Together these findings provide an understanding of the limitations of estimating LTPAEE, provide estimates of the proportion of Canadians meeting the guidelines for physical activity and provide insight into the relationship between meeting the guidelines and chronic conditions. / Thesis (Ph.D, Kinesiology & Health Studies) -- Queen's University, 2009-06-18 16:18:44.998
2

Understanding and Testing the Link Between Motivational Interviewing and Self-Compassion Through Physical Activity Counselling

Pastore, Olivia Lena 04 September 2020 (has links)
Background: Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an accepting and compassionate collaborative counselling style that has been linked with various desirable client outcomes. However, its association with self-compassion (SC), an important psychological resource is unknown. One context in which this relationship can be studied is in Physical Activity Counselling (PAC), which is an MI-based intervention that has been found to enhance motivation towards physical activity (PA) and PA behaviour, as well as reduce depressive symptoms. However, no hypothesized link has ever been made between MI and SC and no research has been done on the impact of MI-based PAC onto SC or has investigated SC’s relationship with PA within PAC. Purpose: Article 1: To explore the link between MI and SC. Article 2: To test this proposed association by investigating the impact of a MI-based intervention, specifically through PAC, over time on (1) self-compassion and its subcomponents, and (2) PA and its intensities. A third and fourth purpose were to (3) examine whether any improvements in SC or PA variables were continued at 1-month follow-up and lastly, (4) study the relationships between SC and PA variables over time in university students and employees receiving PAC. Methods: Article 1: This article was a commentary paper that rationalized the hypothesized link between MI and SC. Article 2: This article reports results from a study which used a repeated-measures experimental study design, whereby forty university students and employees filled out online validated self-report questionnaires assessing SC and PA before (baseline), immediately after (endpoint), and 1-month after (follow-up) receiving individualized PAC sessions. Participants reached out to PAC mostly on their own or were referred by other programs on campus. Fidelity checks showed that PAC counsellors were accepting and compassionate. Results: Article 1: A hypothesized link was made between MI and SC, such that the accepting and compassionate spirit of MI, as well as certain content-based techniques used within could help to foster a self-compassionate mindset within the receivers of MI. Article 2: Paired-samples t-tests and multivariate analysis of variance tests revealed that there were significant moderate-to-large increases in total SC, self-kindness, and total, moderate, and strenuous PA from baseline to endpoint. There was also a significant large effect for decreases in self-judgement and isolation from baseline to endpoint. All changes appeared to be continued at 1-month follow-up. Lastly, results revealed that common humanity at baseline positively influenced moderate PA at endpoint. Conclusion: This provides a strong case for the link between MI and SC and provides preliminary evidence to support the positive impact of MI, specifically through PAC, onto SC and PA variables, as well as their relationship over time. Future research is recommended in order to ascertain these findings and practitioners are encouraged to show high acceptance and compassion while assisting individuals with PA behaviour change.
3

Reliability of an On-line System to Assess Physical Activity Behaviors in an Active Group of Kinesiology Undergraduate Students

Knell, Gregory 08 1900 (has links)
Engaging in muscle strengthening activities (MSA) as part of a physical activity program offers health benefits. Although the merits of physical activity are well documented, many adults fail to meet appropriate levels as recommended in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAGA). To get a more complete understanding on an individual's physical activity behaviors, the Tracking Resistance Exercise and Strength Training (TREST) internet based survey was developed. The purpose of the current study was to determine the test-retest reliability of TREST items. Additionally, the prevalence of participants meeting the 2008 PAGA was reported by gender. The survey was completed approximately two weeks apart by 224 (52% male) undergraduate kinesiology students. Analysis of the survey items presented TREST as a reliable instrument in assessing an individual's physical activity behavior with a focus on MSA. Among the convenience sample of 445 participants (56% male) that completed the survey in assessment #1, 73% met the 2008 PAGA minimum recommendations for MSA (>=2 days/week) and aerobic activity (>= 150 min MVPA). A more complete MSA and MVPA criteria was established (requiring MSA of all seven major muscle groups) and only 32% of participants met this guideline. In general, men engaged in aerobic exercise and MSA more than women. These results cannot be generalized due the age, activity level, and education of the study's participants. Future studies should investigate the validity of TREST items among a sample of varying fitness levels, races/ethnicities, ages, and educational levels.
4

The effects of walking for exercise on cardiovascular disease risk

Murtagh, Elaine M. January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
5

The Perceived Influence of Physical Activity on Queen's MBA Students' Personal, Professional, and Academic Lives

Stoness, RYAN 21 October 2013 (has links)
Using a mix method approach, this research explores the perceived relationship of how physical activity may influence each sphere of a Queen’s MBA student’s life, provides an understanding of how physically active Queen’s MBA students are, and highlights insights as to how certain variables influence the impact of physical activity. / Thesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2013-10-21 11:30:56.804
6

The use of effort rating scales to control exercise intensity in children

Shepherd, Pam January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
7

Extending the theory of planned behaviour : a proposed integrated theoretical model using motivational and volitional variables, including interventions, to predict physical activity and physical activity change in a student population

Skår, Silje January 2011 (has links)
Physical activity is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Levels of physical activity decrease across the lifespan, and findings suggest only between 13-32% of University students are physically active at the recommended level. Research has found that ca. 50% of motivated individuals fail to enact on their intentions to be physically active. The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was described, limitations and additions identified and its use outlined in three areas of investigation predicting physical activity: motivation, volition and intervention. Method: Student Activity and Lifestyle Study at Aberdeen (SALSA), a web-based survey, invited all students at the University of Aberdeen to respond to three questionnaires across the 2005/06 and 2006/07 academic years. SALSA received responses from 1418 and 1273 participants at the start of each academic year, respectively. Social cognitions (e.g. intention, perceived control), self-reported physical activity levels and attendance to the University’s sport facilities were measured. A double-blind randomised controlled trial investigated the efficacy two planning interventions, delivered via the internet, aiming to increase PA. Results and Summary: Findings suggest that students who are motivated benefit from making plans when, where and how to take part in physical activity, and plan how to cope with potential barriers and obstacles. Participants who are more certain of their intentions, aware of effort, the standards required and monitor themselves are more likely to be physically active, even though they are equally motivated and perceive themselves to be in control. Participant who were active in the past were more likely to attend the University’s sport facilities. However, the planning interventions did not increase students’ activity levels or attendance to the University’s sport facilities. Adherence to intervention protocol was low (between 58.8% to 76.7%) and participants dropping out of SALSA were large across both academic years.
8

A longitudinal analysis of physical activity and overweight/obesity in adolescents in Saskatoon

Lai, Hang Thi Kim 23 April 2008
Overweight and obesity, one of the most common public health problems in affluent societies, have become epidemic not only in Canada but also throughout the world. Obesity is also a major contributor to the global burden of chronic disease and disability such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disorders. <p>Studies have demonstrated clearly that higher intake of cholesterol and saturated fats and generally higher intake of energy-dense food are a key determinant of increasing levels of obesity and overweight in children. Physical activity is also recognized as a major factor in preventing obesity among children. Environmental factorsby which we mean both social (such as social support, social networks) and physical environment (such as access to physical activity amenities, roads and trails, grocery stores)in generally believed to have a powerful influence on either limiting or enhancing the effects of fundamental determinants (diet and physical activity) of obesity in children. This thesis focuses on one of the key determinants, physical activity, and in turn examines factors that are related to changing physical activity in children. <p>This research was designed to examine two major questions: (1) How do physical activity and overweigh/obesity change over time in a cohort of adolescents in Saskatoon? Are there differences in the patterns of change in overweight/obesity and physical activity between boys and girls? (2) What are the effects of family/friends and physical environments on the changing patterns of physical activity in this sample? <p>The data used in this study was taken from the in motion studies longitudinal data. Study participants include 837 adolescents from12-18 years of age from two high schools and five elementary schools from two diverse geographic areas in Saskatoon (low and high socioeconomic status). Physical activity patterns of adolescents were investigated over a five-month period (e.g., type, frequency, and duration). Participants were also asked to respond to questions on demographics, social support, perceived benefits and barriers of physical activity, and health practices. <p>The results of this study indicated that overweight/obesity increased with age, while physical activity decreased with age for both boys and girls. Boys overall were more likely to be physically active than were girls. Adolescents who received greater direct support from family members were 21% more likely to sustain their physical activity levels (relative odds 1.21; 95% CI 1.17, 1.24); in contrast, the more the familys indirect support the 5.4% less sustaining were the adolescents physical activity (relative odds 0.94; 95% CI 0.91, 0.98). Home environments which were rich in resources relevant to physical activity had 4% greater influence on adolescents physical activity levels, and this relationship was stronger than that of the influence of living in certain neighbourhoods (relative odds 1.04; 95% CI 1.03, 1.05). <p>This research shed some greater understanding of the impact of familys support and physical environment factors on adolescents continued physical activity levels. The implications of results for further research, targeted programs, and social policy is discussed in the thesis.
9

The Need for a Physical Education: Examining Physical Activity During The Transition to University

Kwan, Matthew 31 August 2011 (has links)
While physical activity (PA) declines across the lifespan, this does not occur linearly. Declines are most pronounced during the transition into early adulthood. This dissertation consisted of three studies examining PA decline during the transition into early adulthood: (1) to understand patterns of PA and other health behaviours of Canadians; (2) to understand reasons for PA declines during entry into university; and (3) to examine the feasibility and effects of a website-delivered PA intervention. Study 1 utilized multilevel modeling to identify patterns of PA, binge drinking and smoking among a nationally-representative cohort of adolescents (N = 640). Results found PA decline evident among all young adults transitioning into early adulthood regardless of educational trajectory – declines being most pronounced among college/university males – highlighting the saliency of PA decline, as other health behaviours stabilized or declined during early adulthood. Given justification for intervening with the university population, study 2 explored students’ perceptions of PA, and their preferences towards a PA intervention. Eight focus groups were conducted with first-year university students (N = 45). Results found students being concerned with PA decline, and were receptive to an Internet-based intervention. However, such concerns are inflected with ambivalence, potentially posing a challenge for interventionists. Findings from studies 1 and 2 informed the development of a website-delivered PA intervention – ‘Active Transition’. Pre-testing was conducted with first-year students (N = 15) and PA experts (N = 7), which found the website and its content being acceptable and usable. Results of the efficacy trial (N = 65) found Active Transition to successfully attenuate declines in PA cognitions, and to some extent, PA behaviours. This confirms the Internet being a useful tool for delivering PA interventions in this population. However, given modest compliance in terms of usage, future work is required to evaluate the addition of more current/popular strategies for engaging students. Overall, this dissertation has provided justification for why it is critical that research continues work with this population, and has provided the foundations in helping with the long-term vision of implementing a population-level initiative to help students attenuate the significant declines in their PA behaviours.
10

The Need for a Physical Education: Examining Physical Activity During The Transition to University

Kwan, Matthew 31 August 2011 (has links)
While physical activity (PA) declines across the lifespan, this does not occur linearly. Declines are most pronounced during the transition into early adulthood. This dissertation consisted of three studies examining PA decline during the transition into early adulthood: (1) to understand patterns of PA and other health behaviours of Canadians; (2) to understand reasons for PA declines during entry into university; and (3) to examine the feasibility and effects of a website-delivered PA intervention. Study 1 utilized multilevel modeling to identify patterns of PA, binge drinking and smoking among a nationally-representative cohort of adolescents (N = 640). Results found PA decline evident among all young adults transitioning into early adulthood regardless of educational trajectory – declines being most pronounced among college/university males – highlighting the saliency of PA decline, as other health behaviours stabilized or declined during early adulthood. Given justification for intervening with the university population, study 2 explored students’ perceptions of PA, and their preferences towards a PA intervention. Eight focus groups were conducted with first-year university students (N = 45). Results found students being concerned with PA decline, and were receptive to an Internet-based intervention. However, such concerns are inflected with ambivalence, potentially posing a challenge for interventionists. Findings from studies 1 and 2 informed the development of a website-delivered PA intervention – ‘Active Transition’. Pre-testing was conducted with first-year students (N = 15) and PA experts (N = 7), which found the website and its content being acceptable and usable. Results of the efficacy trial (N = 65) found Active Transition to successfully attenuate declines in PA cognitions, and to some extent, PA behaviours. This confirms the Internet being a useful tool for delivering PA interventions in this population. However, given modest compliance in terms of usage, future work is required to evaluate the addition of more current/popular strategies for engaging students. Overall, this dissertation has provided justification for why it is critical that research continues work with this population, and has provided the foundations in helping with the long-term vision of implementing a population-level initiative to help students attenuate the significant declines in their PA behaviours.

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