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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The Study of Anti-poverty policies in American,Taiwan and French Government¡]1980 - 2002¡^

Hwang, Kuei-ying 20 December 2004 (has links)
So far as we know, there is no world recognized poverty measurement can adopt to each country. Even the definitions of poverty differentiate from time and places. In Taiwan, the measurement and definition of poverty is similar to France. Both of them adopt each person¡¦s consuming outcomes for the standard of measurement. America adopts quantitative index to calculate and measure their poverty. This measurement is according to different age, sex and family total numbers, and then refers to inflation ratio of each year. About the contents of anti-poverty policy, this study find out the way of dealing with poverty issues in American, French and Taiwan are the same. All of them cannot exclude from the influences of their own historic traditional concepts. That¡¦s why America and Taiwan adopt the Residual Model to relieve the poor. After experienced the painful lessons of two world wars that brought mass poor population, France set up a popular and completed institutional re-distributive model. His or her anti-poverty policy is full caring all different statuses person. In America and Taiwan, the relationships of political parties, anti-poverty policy and elections are hard to separated. But there's a different issue altogether in France, the sense of welfare implants in the mind of French, so that no matter left-wing government or right-wing government rules the country, they could not persuade people to give up the social welfare by the fact of financial deficits. In short, the purpose of this study is try to find out how the left-wing or right-wing government is the way to treatment in the poverty issues. I chose the 1980s of American and France for the beginning -- In America, the neoliberalism economics, the right-wing government, was popular during the 1980s, and France, the only one left-wing government in western democratic countries. These two governments have been to resist poor problems over 20 years for my reference. And then discuss about the results of dealing with poverty problems in Taiwan these 20 years. This study hope can use the poverty problems, for a primary realization of the social welfare policy.
12

Maximizing tourism's contribution to poverty reduction in Rwanda

Grosspietsch, Michael. Unknown Date (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (doctoral)-- Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster (Westfalen), 2007. / Title from title screen (viewed June 29, 2009). "GraSP Münster." Includes bibliographical references (p. 352-370).
13

A modern Christian perspective on global poverty in light of economic globalization an honors project /

Sharp, Isaac B. January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Honors project (B.A.) -- Carson-Newman College, 2010. / Project advisor: Dr. Ross Brummett. Includes bibliographical references (pp. 71-76).
14

Poverty Transitions For The Elderly

Lee, Youngae January 2008 (has links)
No description available.
15

Does the way we measure poverty matter? : an analysis of alternative poverty measures with particular reference to changes in the level of poverty in Australia between 1975 and 1994

Trigger, David Scott, n/a January 2000 (has links)
There has been considerable controversy and debate over recent years about the most appropriate method of measuring poverty. This debate has included, among other issues, the questions of absolute versus relative poverty, the merits of money income as a measure of the standard of living and the associated selection of poverty lines and equivalence scales, and the selection of alternative indices of poverty. A review of the literature indicates that the choice of differing approaches to poverty measurement can lead to differing estimates of poverty. In the face of such results an evaluation of the impact upon poverty estimates of alternative measurement methodology is appropriate. This thesis assesses the impact upon the estimated level of poverty of variations in some of the key poverty measurement parameters. The expenditure data derived from the 1975-76, 1984 and 1993-94 Household Expenditure Surveys have been analysed to assess the sensitivity of poverty estimates, derived from a range of poverty indices, to variations in the generosity of the equivalence scales, the level of the poverty line, and the choice of the indicator of the level of resources used. The sensitivity of each poverty index to variations in these parameters is assessed at both the aggregated level and for the specified household types, while those population subgroups particularly susceptible to poverty are also identified. The poverty distributions derived for each of the survey years are compared to evaluate the impact upon changes in the level of poverty over time of variations in the underlying parameters. The thesis concludes that both poverty estimates at a point in time, and poverty trends over time are sensitive to variations in the equivalence scales, in the level of the poverty line, in the selection of the indicator of the level of resources, and in the choice of poverty index itself. In light of these results, a review of recent Australian poverty research concludes that insufficient attention has been paid to the sensitivity issues associated with the measurement of poverty.
16

Pastoral care to people stricken by poverty

Segwape, Kgosi Solomon. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.(Practical Theology))--University of Pretoria, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 81-82).
17

An investigation into prospects and challenges facing southern African countries in their quest to achieve the Millennium development goals, poverty reduction strategy : the case of South Africa / Lentswe Motsamai

Motsamai, Lentswe January 2011 (has links)
The research paper opens with the evolution of the Millennium Development Goals as a development framework. Having considered the evolution of the Millennium Development Goals, the paper then focuses on the socio-economic and political huddles that will make the realization of the Millennium Development Goals in Southern Africa sub region elusive and insurmountable. The study deliberately uses South Africa as a case study primarily because of her geo-political and economic position in the region. The Republic South Africa is the dominant power south of the Sahara. This paper challenges the existing conviction and rhetoric that depict South Africa as the only notable country south of the Sahara that will indubitably meet the Millennium Development Goals and targets by 2015. The paper draws attention to apparent neglect of the worsening social inequalities, the country's dual economy system, socio-economic and institutional costs of HIV and AIDS as well as neo liberal economic policies that have worsened social disparities in the country. This paper, posits that despite South Africa's economic and political achievements since 1994, the country face intractable socio-economic challenges that will turn the ambition of accomplishing the Millennium Development bleak and elusive. Economic growth alone will not propel the country into sustainable development. The government needs to consider other indicators of development such as employment, health, education, lack of technical skills as well as the growing income inequalities. The paper also looks at the socio-economic and political frameworks that have been devised to propel the country into sustainable development. More emphasis is also alluded to South Africa's system of governance with more emphasis on the role of municipalities in economic development as well as the realization of the Millennium Development Goals. Regional governments are at the heart of sustainable social, economic and political development in South Africa. Provincial governments and ·municipal administration administer social service delivery in their areas of jurisdiction. By in large most of these basic services administered by regional governments such as water, health, housing and social grants are key indicators of the Millennium Development Goals. The paper finally looks at the prospects of achieving the Millennium Development Goals in the region as well as global commitment to the realization of the Millennium Development Goals. In conclusion the research study outlines the findings and recommendations. / Thesis (M.A.(Peace Studies and Inter Relations) North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, 2011
18

An investigation into prospects and challenges facing southern African countries in their quest to achieve the Millennium development goals, poverty reduction strategy : the case of South Africa / Lentswe Motsamai

Motsamai, Lentswe January 2011 (has links)
The research paper opens with the evolution of the Millennium Development Goals as a development framework. Having considered the evolution of the Millennium Development Goals, the paper then focuses on the socio-economic and political huddles that will make the realization of the Millennium Development Goals in Southern Africa sub region elusive and insurmountable. The study deliberately uses South Africa as a case study primarily because of her geo-political and economic position in the region. The Republic South Africa is the dominant power south of the Sahara. This paper challenges the existing conviction and rhetoric that depict South Africa as the only notable country south of the Sahara that will indubitably meet the Millennium Development Goals and targets by 2015. The paper draws attention to apparent neglect of the worsening social inequalities, the country's dual economy system, socio-economic and institutional costs of HIV and AIDS as well as neo liberal economic policies that have worsened social disparities in the country. This paper, posits that despite South Africa's economic and political achievements since 1994, the country face intractable socio-economic challenges that will turn the ambition of accomplishing the Millennium Development bleak and elusive. Economic growth alone will not propel the country into sustainable development. The government needs to consider other indicators of development such as employment, health, education, lack of technical skills as well as the growing income inequalities. The paper also looks at the socio-economic and political frameworks that have been devised to propel the country into sustainable development. More emphasis is also alluded to South Africa's system of governance with more emphasis on the role of municipalities in economic development as well as the realization of the Millennium Development Goals. Regional governments are at the heart of sustainable social, economic and political development in South Africa. Provincial governments and ·municipal administration administer social service delivery in their areas of jurisdiction. By in large most of these basic services administered by regional governments such as water, health, housing and social grants are key indicators of the Millennium Development Goals. The paper finally looks at the prospects of achieving the Millennium Development Goals in the region as well as global commitment to the realization of the Millennium Development Goals. In conclusion the research study outlines the findings and recommendations. / Thesis (M.A.(Peace Studies & International Relations) North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, 2011
19

Poverty in Tucson Field Workshop Community Forum Report 2017

Mayer, Brian 11 May 2017 (has links)
Dr. Brian Mayer's presentation from the Poverty in Tucson Field Workshop 3rd Annual Community Forum held at the Habitat for Humanity, Tucson, May 11, 2017
20

Poor relief in Scotland before 1845 : with particular reference to the contribution made by the Church

Oh, Yeon-Soo January 1994 (has links)
This thesis presents an account of the operation of the system of poor relief in Scotland, as it developed under legislation passed by the Scottish Parliament in the 16th and 17th centuries. Attention is given to the principles which underlay what is usually called the Old Scottish Poor Law as well as to an analysis of the varied practice in providing relief in the country. The first four chapters concentrate on the actual working of the old system---how it was funded, which categories of poor it was intended to support, how and by whom it was managed, the varying mixture in localities of "public" funding (collections at church, dues and fees, interest on accrued capital, legal assessment where this was introduced) and of "private" or "voluntary" funding in money or in kind (individual gifts, community-based subscriptions, and so on). The distinctive approaches to the problem of the local destitute by town and rural areas, and between towns and in different regions of the country, are reviewed. The strains on the old system in the late 18th and early 19th centuries are noted---particularly, the impact of rising and shifting population, the social disorganization caused by agrarian improvements and the onset of rapid industrialization and then by intermittent periods of deep trade recessions and widespread unemployment and of crop failures and dearth in the countryside. In chapters 5 and 6 these social and economic strains form the background to a long debate between those who resisted any change in the Old Poor Law and would-be reformers.

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