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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The purchasing and provision of district nursing in GP fundholding settings : a case study

Goodman, Claire Mairead January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
2

Improved pharmaceutical information exchange with developing countries

Pickering, William Roy January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
3

Towards a conceptual framework for interprofessional practice in the field of learning disability

McCray, Janet Patricia January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
4

Quality of learning in primary care : a social systems inquiry

Kailin, David C. 02 May 2002 (has links)
What constitutes quality of learning in primary care? A social systems view of that central question regards the relationships between dimensions of learning, purposes of primary care, and quality of practice. The question of learning quality was approached in three ways. First, perceptions of learning quality were elicited through recorded interviews with fifteen participants representing diverse roles in a primary care medical clinic. Analysis of the interviews indicated learning sources, factors, and functional dimensions of learning. Second, because learning is constituted in a social practice, the social context of learning in primary care clinics was modeled with qualitative systems diagrams. This exposed systemic barriers and facilitators of learning in practice. Third, learning is directed toward fulfilling the purposes of primary care. The nature of those purposes is not well articulated. A framework of seven core purposes was developed from the perspective of systems phenomenology. This framework extends the biopsychosocial framework in several regards. Perceptions of learning quality, the structural situation of learning in clinical practice, and the core purposes of primary care, all contribute to a social systems understanding of what constitutes learning quality, and how primary care organizations might procure it and assess it. Systems phenomenology represents a significant innovation in social systems science methods. / Graduation date: 2002
5

Evaluation of tuberculosis treatment outcomes and the determinants of treatment failures in the Eastern Cape Province, 2003-2005

Maimela, Eric. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (MSc (Epidemiology, School of Health Systems and Public Health))--University of Pretoria, 2009. / Summary in English. Includes bibliographical references.
6

Tobacco use screening and prevention in primary care setting /

Bou Samra, Sabah January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Missouri--Columbia, 2000. / "May 2000." Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [32]-35). Also available on the Internet.
7

A descriptive study investigating an Indian homoeopathic medical hospital as a homoeopathic primary health care facility

Roddis, Nicholas 09 June 2009 (has links)
M.Tech.
8

Exploring the municipal ward based primary health care outreach teams implementation in the context of primary health care re-engineering in Gauteng

Munshi, Shehnaz January 2017 (has links)
A Research Report submitted to the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of: Master of Public Health (MPH) School of Public Health Faculty of Health Sciences University of the Witwatersrand 19 June 2017 / Background In order to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, South Africa embarked on a strategy in 2011 to re-engineer its Primary Health care (PHC) system. This included the creation of Ward-based Outreach Teams (WBOTs). Each team comprises six community health workers (CHWs) led by a professional nurse linked to a clinic. The national guidelines prescribe that each municipal ward should have at least one WBOT to improve access to health care and strengthen the decentralised district health system. Implementation of the WBOT policy has varied across the country. Methodology This qualitative study explored WBOT staff and manager views on initial WBOT implementation in the Ekurhuleni health district. Research methods included five focus group discussions with CHWs; 14 in-depth interviews with team leaders and managers; and ethnographic observations. Using the framework analysis approach, data were coded based on themes relevant to the National Implementation Research Network’s (NIRN) Implementation Drivers’ Framework, including: competency, leadership and organizational drivers of the initial implementation processes. The context in which implementation occurred was also an important theme, as derived from the NIRN formula for successful implementation. Results There were significant weaknesses underscoring the current implementation of WBOTs in the district. The experiences of WBOT staff and managers illustrate that competence to perform the ideal roles was compromised by poor staff selection, inadequate training and limited coaching. CHWs complained of precarious working conditions, payment delays and uncertainty of employment contracts. Within the community context, CHWs experienced both positive and negative attitudes from the community and clinic staff from inter alia: traditional beliefs; stigma; and, the perception that CHWs were increasing clinic workloads. Despite this, CHWs valued their expanded role, including the ability to refer to services beyond the clinic such a social services, police and home affairs, and felt motivated by the impact of their work in the communities they serve. Weak organisational processes, compounded by poor planning, budgeting and rushed implementation, resulted in problems with procurement of resources. The lack of support for robust data management led to poor data verification, quality and use for decision-making. Communication challenges revealed leadership deficiencies at the national and implementation levels. This led to confusion about the ownership of the programme and poor integration of WBOT into the service delivery package in traditional clinic settings. Conflicting departmental mandates (between provincial and municipal departments), fragmented leadership and accountability, all lack of insight into the policy objectives and a disabling and ill-prepared context, constrained efforts of WBOTs at the local level. This also affected the embeddedness and acceptance of the programme in clinics and the community, impacting on implementation fidelity. Conclusion Sustainable systemic change requires clear, detailed planning guidelines, defined leadership structures, budgetary commitments, and continuous communication strategies. Furthermore, successful change is dependent on the on-going commitment to human resources development and capacity building, including investment in supervision, quality training, organisational support and competent staff. This study highlights the critical importance of organisational readiness that includes health systems and actor readiness when implementing policies across decentralised systems. Furthermore, adaptation to local contexts must be heeded in policy processes. This study further illustrates that in order to re-engineer PHC, to achieve the vision and values set out by the Alma Ata Declaration, and, to strengthen outreach services across relevant sectors, participation of all relevant actors in the implementation process. / MT2017
9

An interdisciplinary study exploring how health communication can most effectively explain Antiretroviral Medication (ART) and motivate adherence among young people

Hickson, Warren January 2016 (has links)
The aim of this study was to explore factors contributing to the success of health communication strategies and supporting visual communication tool(s) designed to explain antiretroviral medication (ART) adherence, and motivate young people who live with HIV to follow an adherence regime. The study drew from the social sciences, including psychology, health sciences and communication. Currently there are an estimated 6.8 million people living with HIV in South Africa, making it the site of the largest HIV epidemic in the world (UNAIDS, 2014). Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is the only effective treatment for HIV and is one of the most demanding medicine regimes, requiring a 90% compliance. Various studies have documented worryingly poor levels of adherence to ART, especially amongst adolescents and young adults in South Africa. The empirical research consisted of a qualitative case study in Khayelitsha, a periurban township on the edge of Cape Town. It focused on young people from Khayelitsha and health care professionals - doctors, nurses, HIV counsellors and pharmacists. Using grounded theory data collection was carried out during two phases of fieldwork, interspersed with periods for data processing and analysis. The principal methods used were focus groups, semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Two key factors emerged from the data that form the basis of a new theoretical understanding: first, concerning how young people become motivated to learn about treatment and adhere to it, and second, concerning how information about treatment can best be communicated to them. In relation to the first of these, findings showed that young people were traumatised by an HIV diagnosis, fearing both that they would get sick and suffer an early death and also that they would be rejected by their belonging groups. This meant that they could not take in the factual information offered, and in addition, had no motivation to do so because the diagnosis resulted in a loss of hope for their present and future lives. According to young people, motivation was an outcome of re-connecting to one or more trusted significant other(s) from within their belonging group, who accepted and supported them. This in turn affirmed their prior belonging identities of son, daughter, cousin or close friend and then reconnected them to their present and future hopes. This renewed motivation to live was the basis for their becoming motivated to learn about treatment and adhere to it. In relation to the second factor, this study found that current communications about treatment were not effective. Specifically, the use of metaphors, which was seen among clinicians as a method of simplifying the complexity of ART adherence messages, was in fact creating confusion. Also, the use of printed information in isolation was not effective; communication was much more effective when it provided a space for discussion. These two key factors form the basis of a health communication strategy for young people who live with HIV and need to adhere to ART. Following on from these findings the study included the production of a film and animation that were identified as the visual communication media that would best support young people's understanding and motivation to adherence. The film presents a case study of a young person who overcame their initial diagnosis shock and, through the acceptance and support of his family, learned to live a normal life with HIV. Young people had said that they wanted to be able to view a film of this kind soon after their diagnosis. The animation, which was designed using a participatory process, used 'iso-type' as the central visual language. It was piloted, and this showed that the best use of a visual communication tool was in a setting that allowed young people to talk about prior losses to HIV within their families and community and about their confusion about treatment, and to ask questions about the meaning of complex biomedical concepts such as an undetectable viral load. All young people who visited the clinics, irrespective of test results, said that they wanted to learn about ART so that they could support friends and family members who lived with HIV, change perceptions about HIV among peers and better prepare in the case of becoming HIV positive themselves. Therefore it is recommended that communication strategies should target patients, their belonging groups and the wider community. This substantive theory contributes knowledge relevant to how ART adherence is communicated to young people. More broadly, this thesis argues that an interdisciplinary approach is required if communication practitioners are to properly understand the meaning that a population attributes to a health challenge; especially in the context of motivation and understanding. It is only when those meanings are fully identified through consolidated social science research that a communication strategy and supporting visual tools can be successfully designed.
10

Evaluations of STI care in Primary Health Care Clinics in Leribe District, Lesotho.

Nthinya, Puleng January 2011 (has links)
Thesis (MPH) -- University of Limpopo, 2011. / Introduction STIs, including easily treatable bacterial infections such as syphilis and gonorrhoea, continue to cause a huge burden of ill health in both developing and developed countries. Syndromic management is currently the best approach for the management of sexually transmitted infections in developing countries, but its successful implementation is often questionable Objectives The overall aim of this study was to assess and compare the quality of STI services in the primary health care clinics in Leribe district, Lesotho. The specific objective of the study was to assess the availability of STI drugs, clinicians’ knowledge of STI management, and the availability of STI examination equipment Methods A descriptive cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted with 23 nurse clinicians in PHC clinics in Leribe district of Lesotho. This study explored the gaps and issues around the provision of syndromic management of STIs using the DISCA tool. Results Most of the facilities have inadequate and non reliable equipment and supplies as well poor and inadequate infrastructure. There is lack of continuous training on STI management, low complete treatment to STI clients with only a few of the health centres giving complete treatment and there was also poor contact tracing of partners. Almost all clinicians cited the correct treatment for managing male urethral syndrome. Conclusion The lack of continuous training compromised STI management because nurse clinicians lacked skills to provide quality services. In general, although the principles of syndromic management are well understood by most clinicians, there are no systems in place to support the use of these guidelines

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