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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Formulation of the study problem and transfer in insight problem solving

Wong, Tsun-hin, John., 黃浚軒. January 2004 (has links)
published_or_final_version / abstract / toc / Psychology / Master / Master of Philosophy
42

Sparse matrix optimisation using automatic differentiation

Price, R. C. January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
43

Problem-solving capacities in family systems

Archer, J. L. January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
44

Change, organisational power and the metaphor 'commodity'

Stowell, Franklyn Arthur January 1989 (has links)
No description available.
45

Intervening in organisational conversations using soft systems methodology

Ledington, P. W. J. January 1989 (has links)
No description available.
46

An analysis of incubation effects in problem solving using a computer-administered assessment tool

Yoo, Sung Ae 15 May 2009 (has links)
An insightful solution to a problem may be promoted by temporarily being away from the problem at hand and engaging in other tasks or problems. Wallas (1926) conceptualized such an interruption period between problem solving activities as an incubation period. The present study examines the effect of such activities that are provided as an incubation period in computer-based problem solving tasks. In addition, this study explores the potential interaction between the type of problems and the type of interruption tasks involving two types of problems (verbal and spatial) and two types of interruption activities (verbal and spatial). One hundred eighty five undergraduate volunteers participated. The participants were randomly assigned to one of the six conditions, Spatial Problems: No-Interruption Task, Spatial Problems: Verbal Interruption Task, Spatial Problems: Spatial Interruption Task, Verbal Problems (Anagrams): No-Interruption Task, Verbal Problems (Anagrams): Verbal Interruption Task, and Verbal Problems (Anagrams): Spatial Interruption Task. A computerized technique was developed and incorporated for data collection and material presentation. This technique was considered to have advantages over the conventional data collection format because of its ability to (1) standardize the presentation and assessment of problem solving tasks, (2) allow subjects to manipulate the problem components as they desire, simulating real world problem solving approaches, and (3) monitor the subjects’ on-going interactions through the use of intricate, covert, data collection techniques. Regression analyses were employed to analyze the data collected using this computerized technique. The findings from the present study partially support the view that problem solvers can benefit from a temporary interruption task in a problem solving sequence. The participants resolved the problems more quickly when distracted by an intervening simple cognitive task than when allowed to work continuously. It was implied that a problem solver could benefit from an interruption that involves stimuli changing visually and spatially and that also demands some degree of cognitive involvement. Although the present study did not demonstrate effects of interaction between the problem types and interruption types, the findings suggested that in the case of spatial problems, engaging in an incubation activity is likely to result in more efficient performance.
47

An examination of the effectiveness of teaching heuristic strategies and metacognitive practice to Year 6/7 students engaging in problem solving in mathematics /

Bentley, Brendan Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MEd (Mathematics and Science Education))--University of South Australia, 1996
48

An examination of the effectiveness of teaching heuristic strategies and metacognitive practice to Year 6/7 students engaging in problem solving in mathematics /

Bentley, Brendan Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MEd (Mathematics and Science Education))--University of South Australia, 1996
49

A Study of Problem-Solving Strategies and Errors in Inequalities for Junior High School Students

Chen, Ying-kuei 09 June 2007 (has links)
A Study of Problem-Solving Strategies and Errors in Inequalities for Junior High School Students The aim of this study is to investigate students in learning in inequalities with one unknown, as well as to collect corresponding strategies and errors in problem solving. The subjects of this study were nine-grade students from junior high school. Six classes were selected from three schools with total of 204 students. This investigator used a paper-and-pencil test in first round data collection. In the second round, some students were interviewed, to further understand students¡¦ way of thinking and reasons in errors produced in problem-solving procedures. Hopefully, results can be used as reference for junior high school math teacher to plan future teaching and to prepare teaching materials. The results of the study are three: students solved linear inequalities by using 12 different strategies; students¡¦ errors can be divided into 11 types; and, the reasons for errors are mainly understanding and transforming information from problems and the determination on solutions. The students also found it difficult to understand negative fractions and negative decimals relationships (no matter in word problems or in calculation problems). In this study, those who fail to solve problems involving inequalities with one unknown are those who cannot translate algebraic expressions or keywords. They produced errors 5 typical cases: determining objectives, integrating mathematics knowledge, using a problem solving method, calculating process, and, determining solution.
50

Student perceptions of problems' structuredness, complexity, situatedness, and information richenss [sic] and their effects on problem-solvingp erformance

Lee, Youngmin. Driscoll, Marcy Perkins. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Florida State University, 2004. / Advisor: Dr. Marcy P. Driscoll, Florida State University, College of Education, Dept. of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems. Title and description from dissertation home page (viewed Jan. 18, 2005). Includes bibliographical references.

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