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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Long-term effects of dietary high protein on renal health in the pig model

Jia, Yong 16 September 2008 (has links)
The impact of habitually consuming a high protein (HP) diet at the upper limit of the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR) on kidney health is unknown. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that long-term consumption of a diet providing 35% of energy as protein will have negative consequences on renal health, as assessed in a pig model. Methods: Adult female, non-pregnant, commercial pigs (Genesus) were randomized to receive either NP (15% energy from protein) or HP (35% energy from protein) isocaloric diets for either 4 or 8 months. Diets contained whole protein sources with an animal: plant ratio of 2:1 in the NP diet to mimic the average Canadian diet. The increased protein in the HP diet was achieved by increasing egg and dairy protein sources. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Glomerular volume and kidney fibrosis were evaluated on kidney sections by quantitative image analysis. The inflammatory marker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the growth factor transforming growth factor beta-1(TGFβ1) were assessed in renal tissue using commercial ELISA kits. Results: Pigs given the HP diet had lower body weights and percentage of body fat. Pigs consuming the HP diet had significantly higher glomerular filtration rates (GFR) and larger kidneys. Renal MCP-1 levels and renal fibrosis also were significantly higher in pigs given the HP diet, while proteinuria and renal TGFβ1 expression did not differ. Conclusion: These findings suggest that, despite the potential benefit of the HP diet on body composition, long-term intakes of protein at the upper limit of the AMDR may compromise renal health in healthy female pigs.
2

The early life programming of adult hypertension by glucocorticoids

Gardner, David Stuart January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
3

Long-term effects of dietary high protein on renal health in the pig model

Jia, Yong 16 September 2008 (has links)
The impact of habitually consuming a high protein (HP) diet at the upper limit of the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR) on kidney health is unknown. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that long-term consumption of a diet providing 35% of energy as protein will have negative consequences on renal health, as assessed in a pig model. Methods: Adult female, non-pregnant, commercial pigs (Genesus) were randomized to receive either NP (15% energy from protein) or HP (35% energy from protein) isocaloric diets for either 4 or 8 months. Diets contained whole protein sources with an animal: plant ratio of 2:1 in the NP diet to mimic the average Canadian diet. The increased protein in the HP diet was achieved by increasing egg and dairy protein sources. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Glomerular volume and kidney fibrosis were evaluated on kidney sections by quantitative image analysis. The inflammatory marker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the growth factor transforming growth factor beta-1(TGFβ1) were assessed in renal tissue using commercial ELISA kits. Results: Pigs given the HP diet had lower body weights and percentage of body fat. Pigs consuming the HP diet had significantly higher glomerular filtration rates (GFR) and larger kidneys. Renal MCP-1 levels and renal fibrosis also were significantly higher in pigs given the HP diet, while proteinuria and renal TGFβ1 expression did not differ. Conclusion: These findings suggest that, despite the potential benefit of the HP diet on body composition, long-term intakes of protein at the upper limit of the AMDR may compromise renal health in healthy female pigs. / October 2008
4

Changes in energy expenditure associated with injestion of high protein, high fat versus high protein, low fat meals among underweight, normal weight, and overweight females

Riggs, Amy Jo, Gropper, Sareen Annora Stepnick. January 2006 (has links) (PDF)
Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Auburn University, 2006. / Abstract. Vita. Includes bibliographic references.
5

Long-term effects of dietary high protein on renal health in the pig model

Jia, Yong 16 September 2008 (has links)
The impact of habitually consuming a high protein (HP) diet at the upper limit of the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR) on kidney health is unknown. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that long-term consumption of a diet providing 35% of energy as protein will have negative consequences on renal health, as assessed in a pig model. Methods: Adult female, non-pregnant, commercial pigs (Genesus) were randomized to receive either NP (15% energy from protein) or HP (35% energy from protein) isocaloric diets for either 4 or 8 months. Diets contained whole protein sources with an animal: plant ratio of 2:1 in the NP diet to mimic the average Canadian diet. The increased protein in the HP diet was achieved by increasing egg and dairy protein sources. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Glomerular volume and kidney fibrosis were evaluated on kidney sections by quantitative image analysis. The inflammatory marker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the growth factor transforming growth factor beta-1(TGFβ1) were assessed in renal tissue using commercial ELISA kits. Results: Pigs given the HP diet had lower body weights and percentage of body fat. Pigs consuming the HP diet had significantly higher glomerular filtration rates (GFR) and larger kidneys. Renal MCP-1 levels and renal fibrosis also were significantly higher in pigs given the HP diet, while proteinuria and renal TGFβ1 expression did not differ. Conclusion: These findings suggest that, despite the potential benefit of the HP diet on body composition, long-term intakes of protein at the upper limit of the AMDR may compromise renal health in healthy female pigs.
6

Effects of high protein consumption on bone and body composition from early to late adulthood in female rats

Pye, Kathleen. January 2008 (has links)
Long-term, high protein diets at 35% of energy may have implications in bone biology. The objective of this study was to comprehensively examine whether a high mixed protein diet at the 35% energy level can be deemed safe with respect to long-term bone health. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive 4, 8, 12, or 17 months of a control (15% of energy as protein) or the high protein diet (35% of energy). Statistical analyses of biochemical, biomechanical, morphological, microarchitectural, and densitometric examinations using a 2-way factorial ANOVA with interaction revealed that elevated protein consumption had no negative consequences to bone health. High protein fed rats had increased lean body mass and decreased body weight and body fat. Thus preliminary results suggest that protein consumption at 35% of energy has a positive effect on body weight and does not hinder the mechanical abilities of bone.
7

Alterations in the macronutrient content of the diet and the effects on body composition, cardiovascular disease risk and the control of energy metabolism in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Gryka, Anna January 2011 (has links)
Background/Objective: Several studies have shown that a low carbohydrate diet (LCHOD) can improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The objective of the current study was to compare two ways of administration of a LCHOD: self-prepared meals versus ready-made meals, and their effects on weight loss, glycaemic control, body composition, cardiovascular risk and resting metabolic rate over 12 months. Research design and methods: Forty-one volunteers with the mean body mass index of 38.8 kg/m2 and poorly controlled T2DM (glycosylated haemoglobin, HbA1c > 7.5%) were randomized to either protein sparing modified fast (< 40g of carbohydrate daily, self-cooked; PSMF) or Go Lower (readymade meals; GL) diet. Both groups received multivitamin supplementation and attended monthly visits. The main outcome was weight loss and its composition. Results: Fourteen (34 %) participants completed 12 months of the intervention. There were no differences in the weight or any other changes between the diet groups at 12 months. Overall, body mass and fat mass decreased (-5.5 ± 7.3 kg, P < 0.001 and -5.1 ± 6.7 kg, P < 0.001 respectively) but fat free mass did not change. There was an overall reduction in HbA1c (-0.4 ± 1.1 %, P < 0.001), increase in HDL-cholesterol (+0.07 ± 0.18 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and decrease in triacylglycerol (-0.6 ± 2.4 mmol/L, P = 0.014). Resting metabolic rate significantly decreased (-137 ± 265 kcal/d, P < 0.001). Conclusion: LCHOD, independently of the approach taken, led to weight loss and improvements in glycaemic control in obese volunteers with poorly controlled T2DM. The results confirm that lifestyle modification using LCHOD is effective for improving T2DM and suggest that the type of approach to the diet can be matched to an individual’s preferences.
8

Quantitative estimation of dietary energy deficiency and effects of Its supplementation on protein nutritional status of nondiabetic uremic patients undergoing protein restricted dietary regimens

Iwayama, Norihisa, Shinzato, Toru, Nakai, Shigeru, Ando, Shizue, Nagake, Yoshio, Makino, Hirofumi, Maeda, Kenji 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
9

Effect of protein source on calcium and magnesium excretion in adult rats fed high protein diets

McMillon, Deborah K January 2011 (has links)
Typescript (photocopy). / Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
10

Weight Loss Maintenance and Physical and Emotional Effects in Obese Subjects Treated with a Protein-Sparing Modified Fast

Jacobs, Hilarie H. 08 1900 (has links)
Weight loss maintenance and emotional and physical problems were investigated in subjects on a protein-sparing modified fast. Four months following a weight reduction program using the protein-sparing modified fast, twenty of the forty-two subjects were contacted. Each was asked to complete a questionnaire related to emotional and physical effects of the diet and a diet history checksheet. Each subject was weighed to determine if weight loss had been maintained. Results of the questionnaire, diet history, and blood chemistry analysis indicate that for these subjects, the modified fast may be safe and effective in reducing and maintaining weight loss over a short time period under close supervision by a physician.

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