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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
51

Psychiatric nursing staff knowledge and attitudes of recipient rights a research report submitted in partial fulfillment ... /

Davis, Sharon E. Perrott, Helen L. January 1979 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Michigan, 1979.
52

Psychiatric nursing staff knowledge and attitudes of recipient rights a research report submitted in partial fulfillment ... /

Davis, Sharon E. Perrott, Helen L. January 1979 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Michigan, 1979.
53

The role of attachment status in predicting longitudinal relationships between session-impact events and the working alliance within an adolescent client population

Ji, Peter Yun, January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2001. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [114]-129). Also available on the Internet.
54

Mental illness : towards an understanding of the experience of treatment and diagnosis /

Coates, Rosanne Margaret. January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Ed.)--Acadia University, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 188-192). Also available on the Internet via the World Wide Web.
55

A phenomenological study of psychotherapy: a client explicates his experience

Frank, Anthony Ernest January 1982 (has links)
From Introduction: This thesis involves a detailed explication of my experience as a client in psychotherapy. Being in therapy has brought about extremely important ·changes in my life and continues to do so. Being involved · in the field of· psychology as a student and therapist-to-be, the experience of therapy has also been a valuable source of a greater understanding of the process itself. The various facets of the importance of my experience of psychotherapy will become clear in my explication. It is a fact that experience, which is an essential aspect of our humanness, has been sadly neglected in psychological research. It is surely psychology's task to explore all aspects of humanity, and this neglect of experience has only fairly recently been questioned. Its reasons have been psychology's bias towards the natural sciences whose methods are not suitable for the study of experience. The tremendous achievements of the natural sciences caused psychology to adopt this slant, as Sigmund Koch (19.69) puts it, "The stipulation that psychology be adequate · to science outweighed the commitment that it be adequate to man". (p 65).
56

Riglyne vir groepterapie in 'n psigiatriese hospitaal

Els, Gysbertus van Rooyen 18 March 2014 (has links)
M.A. (Psychology) / This study set out to try and find some answers to questions pertaining to psychotherapy groups in the admissions ward of a psychiatric hospital. The questions were about the effect of group therapy on: * the system of the psychiatric hospital; * the therapists within the system of the psychiatric hospital; * the members of the groups (the patients). * which prosesses took place within the group therapy that can be regarded as therapeutic, and * which prosesses can be described as anti-therapeutic and destructive? The study is descriptive in nature and looks in turn to group therapy in the context of the psychiatric hospital and the efforts of two clinical psychology interns to run therapy groups in the admissions ward of a psychiatric hospital. The conclusion is made that the effectiveness of group therapy in a psychiatric hospital is limited as long as the epistemological differences between psychiatry and psychology are not attended to and as long as the status of psychologists in general, and interns in particular, stays as it is at present. With this in mind, recommendations are made regarding the context, organisation, goals and structure of group therapy as well as the role of the therapist, training of interns in group therapy and further research.
57

Die behandelingsbelewenis van psigiatriese pasiënte in 'n privaat kliniek

Stols, Helene Elizabeth 30 June 2014 (has links)
M.Cur. (Psychiatric Nursing) / With modern psychiatric treatment, patients usually come into contact with as many as six different team members. These team members have their own particular treatment plans for patients. This has prompted the question: "How do patients experience their treatment by the interprofessional health team?" The aims of this study are as follows: • To explore psychiatric patients' experiences of their treatment by the interprofessional health team in a particular private psychiatric clinic. • To set basic guidelines which will promote the optimisation of treatment of psychiatric patients by the interprofessional health team, in order to prevent the aggravation of mental illness, emphasising the contribution of the psychiatric nurse.
58

A systemic description of a psychiatric locked ward

Capitani, Gina Maria 11 September 2014 (has links)
M.A. (Clinical Psychology) / The focus of this study centres on the dynamics of psychiatric female acute locked ward. The aim of the thesis is to offer an additional view of a psychiatric locked ward,with the potential of opening new avenues of functioning or change. A systemic theoretical model is utilised in an attempt to reach such an understanding/perspective. The casestudy method was adopted which involved clinical observation by an intern clinical psychologist. The thesis demonstrated that individual behaviour and/or interaction between individuals on a psychiatric locked ward may be further related to the context or unit as a whole. In other words, understanding/perception may be extended to a further level of interpretation, namely, at a systemic or feedback of feedback level.
59

An examination of patients' responses to framework breaks in psychotherapy in an institutional context

Rees, Christopher Lewis January 1998 (has links)
This study examines the workings of the ground rules which make up the framework of psychotherapy, in an institutional context, by analysing transcripts of twelve audio taped sessions of therapy conducted in a psychiatric hospital. The breaks in the ground rules of the sessions are noted and the patients' responses to these breaks are analysed using Langs's (1982, 1988) method for decoding patients' material, suitably modified for use as a hermeneutic research method. Although all of the ground rules are broken in the institutional context, only one of the ten ground rules appears to be essentially affected by this particular institutional context. Other ground rules are broken out of choice of technique or through error. The institutional context has a structural impact only on the ground rule requiring a one to one relationship with privacy and confidentiality and this ground rule is transgressed in a number of ways in all twelve sessions examined in this study. However the patients' responses to this breach only occur in ways predicted by communicative theory when the break in the ground rule involves actual entry into the therapy space by another person. Other contraventions to this ground rule that do not involve such an entry do not elicit the predicted patient responses. The many other ground rule breaks occurring in the institutional context evoke the predicted responses in the patients' material. In the study, no therapist interventions are found to comply with the communicative therapy requirements for sound interventions; concomitantly it was found that no therapist interventions receive the required derivative validation. The results indicate that it is possible to conduct therapy of a substantially secure frame variety in this institutional context with minimum effort on the part of therapists and given proper training and supervision of therapists in the techniques of communicative psychotherapy. Furthermore the results lend weight to the importance of the communicative methodology for listening to patients' material in psychotherapy in an institutional context. However, further rigorous study of competently performed therapy, executed within the context of a secure frame within an institutional context, is needed in order to demonstrate the benefits of the communicative psychotherapy interventions and interpretations in this context.
60

Dual diagnosis substance abuse in Vancouver mental health boarding homes : a need assessment survey

Hayward, Timothy James January 1990 (has links)
This study explores the dual diagnosis substance abuse phenomenon within the context of Vancouver area mental health boarding homes. The target population consisted of thirty-nine mental health boarding homes used by Greater Vancouver Mental Health Services, Mental Health Residental Services. An attempt was made to survey directors (n=37), staff (n=unknown), and residents (n = 422), to: estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis substance abuse within these homes; look for associations between substance use/abuse and the demographic characteristics of staff, directors, and residents; examine boarding home policies; and to establish what, if any, services should be developed. Questionnaires were completed by twenty-nine directors (78%), twenty staff members (% unknown), and ten residents (3%), from twenty-nine boarding homes with a total resident population of 358. Results indicated that one hundred and fifteen residents (32%) consumed alcohol, and 57 residents (16%) had consumed alcohol during a specified two week period. Only eight residents (2%) out of a potential 358 (from four different facilities) reportedly had substance related problems during the specified two week period. However, substance abuse was identified in eleven facilities (38%), without referrence to the two week time limitation. Further, staff and directors from fifteen facilities (52%) had at some time tried to get help for a resident with a substance abuse problem. Thus, while very few residents reportedly had dual diagnosis substance abuse problems, a considerably greater number of boarding homes reportedly had problems related to dual diagnosis substance abuse. Twenty-four directors (86%) and thirteen staff (68%) were interested in receiving a workshop on dual diagnosis substance abuse. It is the recommendation of this author that a drug education program/workshop for boarding home directors and staff be developed through the Greater Vancouver Mental Health Services "dual diagnosis program." / Arts, Faculty of / Social Work, School of / Graduate

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