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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Application of Shingo's Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED) methodology to reduce punch press changeover times at Krueger International

Michels, Brian T. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references.
2

Design, construction, calibration and testing of a punch press dynamometer

Patel, Dinesh M. January 1964 (has links)
Call number: LD2668 .T4 1964 P29 / Master of Science
3

A new sheet metal forming system based on incremental punching. / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection

January 2010 (has links)
In order to ensure the desirable performance of the machine, dynamic analysis of the machine is necessary. The analysis is conducted by the mean of computer simulation in consideration of applying a large impulsive force. This study validates the machine stability and accuracy. / In order to verify the new mechanics model, numerical and experimental studies are conducted using the new incremental punching system. The final shape and thickness distributions of parts are compared to verify the mechanics model. It is found that the model prediction fits the experiment result well. Forming parameters are also investigated. / In this research, a new incremental forming system based on incremental punching is designed and built. The system consists of a 3-axes CNC platform, a high speed hydraulic cylinder with a hemispherical forming tool, and a PC-based CNC control system. The hydraulic system provides the forming force to deform the sheet metal with constant stokes, while the CNC system positions the part. When forming a part, the forming tool punches the sheet metal along the given contour of the part punch by punch; when one layer of the part is completed, the forming tool moves down to the next layer; and the process is finished till all layers are completed. The CNC control system works with standard NC code, and hence, is easy to use. / ISMF uses a small generic tool to apply a sequence of operations along the given path to deform the sheet incrementally. These small deformations accumulate to form the final shape of the part. As a result, different parts can be made by the same setup. Despite of some 30 years of research and development, however, ISMF technology is still premature for industrial applications due to the following reasons: The accuracy of the part is limited; the surface roughness is poor; and the productivity is low. This motivates the presented research. / One of the keys to successful application of sheet metal forming is to be able to predict the deformation and the strain/stress of the part incurred during the forming process. Because of the complexity of the ISMF process, it is not possible to derive an analytical method. The alternative is to use Finite Element Analysis (FEA). However, based on our experience, it takes about one week to solve a simple case. A mechanics model is therefore developed. It consists of two steps. The first step is to computer the final shape: the initial geometric surface is obtained using the punch positions; then using the minimum energy principle, the virtual forces drive the nodes of geometric surface to their lowest energy positions, which gives the final shape of the forming part. The second step is to predict the strain and stress distributions. This is done using the inverse Finite Element Modeling (FEM). An in-house computer software is developed using MATLABRTM. / Stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes. Everyday, millions of parts are formed by this process. The conventional stamping is to form a part in one or several operations with a press machine and a set/sets of dies. It is very efficient but is not cost effective for small batch production parts and prototypes as the dies are expensive and time consuming to make. Recently, with the increasing demands for low-volume and customer-made products, a die-less forming method, Incremental Sheet Metal Forming (ISMF), has become one of the leading R&D topics in the industry. / To evaluate the capability of the presented ISMF process, the formability is studied by the means of theory and experiment. A modified M-K model is proposed for predicting the forming limit of the formed part which is undergoing a very complicated strain path. The maximum forming angle is also investigated by experiments. / Luo, Yuanxin. / Adviser: Ruxu Du. / Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 72-04, Section: B, page: . / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2010. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 121-133). / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest Information and Learning Company, [200-] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Abstract also in Chinese.
4

Indentation of an elastic half-space and layered-systems by heated punches /

Tsai, Tsong-po January 1973 (has links)
No description available.
5

The development of a design protocol for production of high speed coining dies

Kotze, Burger Adriaan. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.Eng.(Mechanical Engineering))--University of Pretoria, 2000. / Includes abstract in English.
6

Characterization of Punching Shear Capacity of Thin Uhpc Plates

Harris, Devin K. 29 December 2004 (has links)
UHPC (ultra-high performance concrete) is a relatively new type of concrete that exhibits mechanical properties that are far superior to those of conventional concrete and in some cases rival those of steel. The main characteristics that distinguish UHPC from conventional reinforced concrete are the improved compressive strength, the tensile strength, the addition of steel fibers, and the resistance to corrosion and degradation. The mechanical properties of UHPC allow for smaller, thinner, lighter sections to be designed while strength is maintained or improved. The use of UHPC has been limited to a few structural applications due to the high cost of the materials and the lack of established design guidelines. A proposed material model based on material and finite element models has served as the foundation of this research effort. The model was used to minimize the dimension of an optimum section in order to limit the material usage and maximize the performance. In the model, the top flange served as the riding surface and contained no reinforcing steel to resist shear. The lack of steel reinforcement allowed for the possibility of a punching shear failure to occur from the application of a point load such as a wheel tire patch load. The model and optimized section served as the foundation for this research, the characterization of punching shear capacity of thin UHPC plates. A total of 12 UHPC slabs were tested to failure to determine the boundary between a flexural failure and a punching shear failure. The variables considered were the slab thickness and loading plate dimensions. The results of the testing were compared to existing models for punching shears and other failure modes, with varying success. The test results aided in the development of a design equation for the prediction of punching shear in UHPC slabs. After evaluation of the test results, recommendations are made as to which model predicts the punching shear capacity of UHPC slabs and the minimum slab thickness required to prevent a punching shear failure. / Master of Science
7

Punching Shear Retrofit of Concrete Slab-Column Connections with GFRP Shear Bolts

Lawler, Nicholas David January 2008 (has links)
Over the life span of a structure it may become necessary to retrofit, or strengthen certain components or elements. This may be due to construction errors, changes in use and occupancy, or changes due to material deterioration or damage. Slab-column connections in flat slab structures might need to be strengthened for punching shear. Using steel shear bolts to strengthen connections for punching shear is a new technique used for retrofit that was developed at the University of Waterloo. If the retrofitted part of the structure is exposed to the atmosphere, or to chemicals such as deicing salts, the steel can corrode, thus furthering to damage the structure. Non-corrosive materials that can replace the steel shear bolts can be a good practical alternative to steel. Reported in this thesis are the results of research on the development and use of non-corrosive shear bolts for reinforced concrete interior slab-column connections. Externally applied shear reinforcing bolts provide the punching shear reinforcement strength, while allowing the flexibility and ease of installation of an external application after construction. By providing a bearing area against both sides of the slab surface, the formation of punching shear cracks can be restrained, and the connection can become strengthened against punching shear failure. Three different types of non-corrosive shear bolts were developed and tested. The first was an off-the-shelf glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bolt / nut product. The two others used two different GFRP core rods with aluminum fittings crimped to their ends. A total of six specimens were tested, four were tested under an increasing static load, while two were tested with an unbalanced pseudo-dynamic lateral load. All six specimens were designed to fail in punching shear before reaching their flexural capacity. The results are compared against previous test results of specimens both unreinforced and reinforced with steel shear bolts to determine their effectiveness. From the test results it was found that the GFRP shear bolts did strengthen the connections for punching shear. The GFRP nut and bolt did not strengthen the connection, and, in fact, decreased its overall strength when compared to the unreinforced specimen. The presence of the GFRP shear bolts also increased the connection ductility and the deflection capability. In the pseudo-dynamic tests the GFRP shear bolts significantly increased the amount of energy dissipated by the connection under reverse cyclic loading. The results of the testing appeared to be depended on the proper application of the crimping technique to place the bolts in the slab.
8

Punching Shear Retrofit of Concrete Slab-Column Connections with GFRP Shear Bolts

Lawler, Nicholas David January 2008 (has links)
Over the life span of a structure it may become necessary to retrofit, or strengthen certain components or elements. This may be due to construction errors, changes in use and occupancy, or changes due to material deterioration or damage. Slab-column connections in flat slab structures might need to be strengthened for punching shear. Using steel shear bolts to strengthen connections for punching shear is a new technique used for retrofit that was developed at the University of Waterloo. If the retrofitted part of the structure is exposed to the atmosphere, or to chemicals such as deicing salts, the steel can corrode, thus furthering to damage the structure. Non-corrosive materials that can replace the steel shear bolts can be a good practical alternative to steel. Reported in this thesis are the results of research on the development and use of non-corrosive shear bolts for reinforced concrete interior slab-column connections. Externally applied shear reinforcing bolts provide the punching shear reinforcement strength, while allowing the flexibility and ease of installation of an external application after construction. By providing a bearing area against both sides of the slab surface, the formation of punching shear cracks can be restrained, and the connection can become strengthened against punching shear failure. Three different types of non-corrosive shear bolts were developed and tested. The first was an off-the-shelf glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bolt / nut product. The two others used two different GFRP core rods with aluminum fittings crimped to their ends. A total of six specimens were tested, four were tested under an increasing static load, while two were tested with an unbalanced pseudo-dynamic lateral load. All six specimens were designed to fail in punching shear before reaching their flexural capacity. The results are compared against previous test results of specimens both unreinforced and reinforced with steel shear bolts to determine their effectiveness. From the test results it was found that the GFRP shear bolts did strengthen the connections for punching shear. The GFRP nut and bolt did not strengthen the connection, and, in fact, decreased its overall strength when compared to the unreinforced specimen. The presence of the GFRP shear bolts also increased the connection ductility and the deflection capability. In the pseudo-dynamic tests the GFRP shear bolts significantly increased the amount of energy dissipated by the connection under reverse cyclic loading. The results of the testing appeared to be depended on the proper application of the crimping technique to place the bolts in the slab.
9

A CAD/CAM system for sheet metal blanking dies /

Wong, Kai-wing. January 1991 (has links)
Thesis (M. Phil.)--University of Hong Kong, 1992.
10

Analysis of a mechanical punching process to create registration holes on a continuous roll-to-roll flexible electronics substrates using SPC techniques

Yepez, Denisse E. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--State University of New York at Binghamton, Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of Systems Science and Industrial Engineering, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references.

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