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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

ORGANIZATIONAL PURCHASE DECISION MAKING: INFORMATION-PROCESSING STRATEGIES AND EVOKED SETS OF QUALIFIED SUPPLIERS

LeBlanc, Ronald Peter January 1981 (has links)
This research project specifically investigates the use of information processing strategies by organizational buyers in the first stage of the supplier selection process, the selection of an evoked set of qualified suppliers. In this selection process it is hypothesized that the buyer's use of evaluation functions or information processing strategies is influenced by the task faced by the buyer. The varying levels of risk, familiarity and informational requirements of the buying situation should impact the use of the information processing strategies. Structured protocols--written descriptions of compensatory and noncompensatory information processing strategies--were used to determine the evaluation function which organizational buyers use to qualify suppliers into an evoked set. The data was collected in a field study of 135 organizational buyers from 76 different organizations. The subjects were interviewed about purchases they were presently working on in which suppliers had been selected but the final purchase decision was still pending. Identification of the buying task, new task, modified rebuy, and straight rebuy also utilized the structured protocol technique. Written descriptions, based on the constitutive definitions of Robinson and Farris (1967), were used to address the following research question: Is there a difference in the decision rules or information processing strategies utilized by organizational buyers in the development of an evoked set of qualified suppliers when the buyer is qualifying suppliers for a new task, modified rebuy, or straight rebuy buying task? In addition to the information gathered via the structured protocols, information was gathered about the level of risk, familiarity and information requirements of the purchasing task. This was done to gain a better understanding of the use of information-processing strategies by organizational buyers. Analysis of the data indicates that the buying task is related to the choice of an information-processing strategy. The data also support the contention that the organizational buyer will utilize any of the information-processing strategies in the selection of an evoked set of suppliers. Although the buying task was found to significantly influence the use of the information-processing strategies, the study shows that all of the strategies were reported as being used for each of the buying tasks. In addition to finding that the buying task influences the choice of an information-processing strategy, the data support the model of information processing presented. The model addressed the impact that risk, familiarity, and information load had on the use of the evaluation functions. The risk node of the model was supported by two of the five risk variables included in the study: product homogeneity and supplier homogeneity. At the familiarity nodes of the model, the subjective measures of familiarity which support the model are supplier familiarity and frequency of product purchase. Supplier familiarity was found to be significantly different between the weighted and unweighted compensatory strategies. The significant difference in the level of familiarity found in the use of the conjunctive and disjunctive information processing strategies is associated with the frequency of product purchase. The final nodal section of the information-processing model which was supported is the comparison of the conjunctive and lexicographic strategies. The lexicographic strategy was found to be used when there was a higher perceived number of suppliers capable of supplying the needed product. In general this study has shown that the situation in which suppliers are selected impacts the use of an information-processing strategy. The findings are consistent with the research and hypothesizing associated with the use of information-processing strategies by consumers.
2

A comparative analysis of factors affecting the purchasing decisions of cleaning rag buyers in the Eastern Cape

Shearer, David Charcles January 2012 (has links)
The objectives of this research project were to identify and compare factors that influence the purchasing decisions of Multifibres’ customers active in each channel. Multifibres manufactures and distributes industrial cleaning rags to three channels or client categories, these being industrial resellers, industrial end-users and the walk-in customers. An extensive literature review revealed that purchasing decisions are influenced by, amongst other factors, the buyer’s role, the internal cognitive processes of the buyer, as well as factors present in the buyer’s business and external environment. An empirical study was conducted utilising in-depth interviews. The most prevalent, emergent themes that buyers attached the greatest weight to when purchasing cleaning rags were: price; quality; service; relationships; and, convenience. These factors were probed, analysed and compared, based on each buyer category’s unique set of characteristics. When motivating their purchasing preferences, resellers emphasised the importance of the business relationship and trust as being paramount, while end-users viewed price and service as the most important factors. Walk-in customers valued the combination of price and convenience as the most important reasons influencing their purchasing decisions.
3

The effect of group influence on organizational buying

Stoddard, James E. 04 March 2009 (has links)
This research explores the process by which individual buying decisions are modified as a result of group discussion to arrive at a buying center decision. Existing evidence shows that, in some cases, group decisions are more cautious than those of individuals while in other situations they are more risky. The objective of this paper is to examine how individual buying center member choices are formed, how these choices and preferences are influenced by group discussion, and how the purchase decision context influences the riskiness of individual versus group purchasing discussions. One of the key concepts from prospect theory that guides an individual buying decision is the decision frame. However, little is known about how the decision frame of multiple individuals coming together to discuss a decision issue affects the group's overall decision. This research develops a model which describes (1) how an organizational buyer's individual choice is formed, (2) how the influence processes that transpire during buying center discussion changes those choices resulting in a different buying center choice, and (3) explores how the purchasing context may impact these processes. The model was tested in two controlled laboratory experiments in which 256 undergraduate business students made supplier selection decisions both individually and in groups based on information contained in four hypothetical procurement scenarios. The results were analyzed using a partially confounded experimental analysis of variance procedure and a series of t tests which tend to provide Support for the model. Specifically, the findings suggest that the decision frame used by individual buyers combined with group influence affects buying center choices. However, contrary to the predictions offered by prospect theory, when decision were framed as a gain, buyers selected the risky supplier and when decisions were framed as a loss, buyers selected the cautious supplier. For this study, no evidence was found to support the notion that group discussion intensifies the effect of the decision frame. Finally, whether the procurement is goods- or service-based seems to impact the effect of influence on the polarization of the buying centers choice. / Ph. D.
4

Kupní rozhodovací proces při nákupu mobilního telefonu / Purchasing decision-making process during a mobile phone buying

Kubíková, Michaela January 2009 (has links)
The goal of my thesis was to characterize using of mobile phones and particular phases of purchasing decision-making process during a mobile phone buying in the czech market and pursuant to this define some marketing recommendations for producers of these devices. I have also verified or defeated hypotheses defined by me. I have used the information gained by secondary research and method of questioning and I have written the results down in the charts or graphs. Then I have summarized chosen findings and suggested recommendations.

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