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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Characterization of the mechanisms of ATM activation by the MRN complex and DNA

Lee, Ji Hoon 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
2

Characterization of the mechanisms of ATM activation by the MRN complex and DNA

Lee, Ji Hoon, January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2005. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
3

Functional characterization of human hMRE11 and hMRE11-hMLH1 interplay in DNA mismatch repair /

Zhu, Fengxue, January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.S. in biochemistry)--Washington State University, May 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 81-86).
4

Functional characterization of human hMRE11 and hMRE11-hMLH1 interplay in DNA mismatch repair

Zhu, Fengxue, January 2006 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S. in biochemistry)--Washington State University, May 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 81-86).
5

Mechanical properties, early age volume change, and heat generation of rapid, cement-based repair materials

Dornak, Mitchell Lee 09 October 2014 (has links)
Currently, in Texas, there is a need for different repairs on pavements and bridge decks; rapid repair materials designed for these repairs are available but the service life and durability of these products are often inadequate. Thus, the goal for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is to implement repairs with an extended service life in a timely manner, in order to cause minimal disruption. Research performed under TxDOT Project 6723 (Development of Rapid, Cement-based Repair Materials for Transportation Structures) evaluated a wide range of rapid repair materials, including calcium aluminate cement (CAC), calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA), fly ash alkali activated blends, and ordinary portland cement. Some of the properties which contribute to a long-term service life are: mechanical properties, early-age volume change, and the heat evolution; often, the early-age development of these repair materials can cause later durability issues. These properties were examined through a variety of experiments and test in the laboratory, as well as, in the field. / text
6

Combining data structure repair and program repair

Malik, Muhammad Zubair 19 September 2014 (has links)
Bugs in code continue to pose a fundamental problem for software reliability and cause expensive failures. The process of removing known bugs is termed debugging, which is a classic methodology commonly performed before code is deployed. Traditionally, debugging is tedious, often requiring much manual effort. A more recent technique that complements debugging is data structure repair, which handles bugs that make it to deployed systems and lead to erroneous behavior at runtime by modifying erroneous program states to recover from errors. While data structure repair presents a promising basis for dealing with bugs at runtime, it remains computationally expensive. Our thesis is that debugging and data structure repair can be integrated to provide the basis of an effective approach for removing bugs before code is deployed and handling them after it is deployed. We present a bi-directional integration where ideas at the basis of data structure repair assist in automating debugging and vice versa. Our key insight is two-fold: (1)a repair action performed to mutate an erroneous object field value to repair it can be abstracted into a program statement that performs that update correctly; and (2)repair actions that are performed repeatedly to fix the same error can be memoized and re-used. We design, develop, and evaluate two techniques that embody our insight. One, we present an automated debugging technique that leverages a systematic constraint-based data structure repair technique developed in previous work and provides suggestions on how to fix a faulty program. Two, we present repair abstractions that are based on the same central ideas as in our automated debugging technique and memoize how an erroneous state was repaired, which enables prioritizing and re-using repair actions when the same error occurs again. The focus of our work is programs that operate on structurally complex data, e.g., heap-allocated data structures that have complex structural integrity constraints, such as acyclicity. Checking such constraints plays a central role in the techniques that lay at the foundation of our work. These techniques require the user to provide the constraints, which poses a burden on the user. To facilitate the use of constraint-based techniques, we present a third technique to check constraint violations at runtime using graph spectra, which have been studied extensively by mathematicians to capture properties of graphs. We view the heap of an object-oriented program as an edge-labeled graph, which allows us to apply results from graph spectra theory. Experimental results show the effectiveness of using graph spectra as a basis of capturing structural properties of a class of commonly used data structures. / text
7

Synthetically lethal interactions classify novel genes in postreplication repair in <i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>

Barbour, Leslie 25 February 2005
<p>Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are equipped with DNA repair mechanisms to protect the integrity of their genome in case of DNA damage. In the eukaryotic organism <i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>, MMS2 encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant protein belonging to the RAD6 repair pathway; MMS2 functions in error-free postreplication repair (PRR), a subpathway parallel to REV3 mutagenesis. A mutation in MMS2 does not result in extreme sensitivity to DNA damaging agents; however, deletion of both subpathways of PRR results in a synergistic phenotype. By taking advantage of the synergism between error-free PRR and mutagenesis pathway mutations, a conditional synthetic lethal screen was used to identify novel genes genetically involved in PRR. A synthetic lethal screen was modified to use extremely low doses of MMS that would not affect the growth of single mutants, but would effectively kill the double mutants. Fifteen potential mutants were characterized, of which twelve were identified as known error-prone PRR genes. Characterization of mutations in strains SLM-9 and SLM-11, that are conditionally synthetically lethal with mms2Ä, revealed functions for both checkpoints and mating-type heterozygosity in regulating PRR. Cell cycle checkpoints monitor the integrity of the genome and ensure that cell cycle progression is deferred until chromosome damage is repaired. The checkpoint genes genetically interact with both the error-free and error-prone branches of PRR, potentially for delaying cell cycle progression to allow time for DNA repair, and for signaling the stage of the cell cycle and thus DNA content. Other potential monitors for DNA content are the a1 and á2 proteins encoded by the mating type genes MATa and MATá, respectively. Diploid cells heterozygous for mating type (a/á) show an increased resistance to UV damage and are more recombination-proficient than haploid cells. Haploid PRR mutants expressing both mating type genes show an increased resistance to DNA-damaging agents. This phenomenon is specific to PRR: it was not seen in excision repair-deficient and recombination-deficient mutants tested. The rescuing effect seen in PRR mutants heterozygous for mating type is likely the result of channeling lesions into a recombination repair pathway and away from the non-operational PRR pathway. Both checkpoint and mating type genes play a role in regulating PRR. Almost certainly these genes are required to monitor the cell cycle stage and DNA content to determine the best mechanism to repair the damaged DNA thus preventing genomic instability.</p>
8

Synthetically lethal interactions classify novel genes in postreplication repair in <i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>

Barbour, Leslie 25 February 2005 (has links)
<p>Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are equipped with DNA repair mechanisms to protect the integrity of their genome in case of DNA damage. In the eukaryotic organism <i>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</i>, MMS2 encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant protein belonging to the RAD6 repair pathway; MMS2 functions in error-free postreplication repair (PRR), a subpathway parallel to REV3 mutagenesis. A mutation in MMS2 does not result in extreme sensitivity to DNA damaging agents; however, deletion of both subpathways of PRR results in a synergistic phenotype. By taking advantage of the synergism between error-free PRR and mutagenesis pathway mutations, a conditional synthetic lethal screen was used to identify novel genes genetically involved in PRR. A synthetic lethal screen was modified to use extremely low doses of MMS that would not affect the growth of single mutants, but would effectively kill the double mutants. Fifteen potential mutants were characterized, of which twelve were identified as known error-prone PRR genes. Characterization of mutations in strains SLM-9 and SLM-11, that are conditionally synthetically lethal with mms2Ä, revealed functions for both checkpoints and mating-type heterozygosity in regulating PRR. Cell cycle checkpoints monitor the integrity of the genome and ensure that cell cycle progression is deferred until chromosome damage is repaired. The checkpoint genes genetically interact with both the error-free and error-prone branches of PRR, potentially for delaying cell cycle progression to allow time for DNA repair, and for signaling the stage of the cell cycle and thus DNA content. Other potential monitors for DNA content are the a1 and á2 proteins encoded by the mating type genes MATa and MATá, respectively. Diploid cells heterozygous for mating type (a/á) show an increased resistance to UV damage and are more recombination-proficient than haploid cells. Haploid PRR mutants expressing both mating type genes show an increased resistance to DNA-damaging agents. This phenomenon is specific to PRR: it was not seen in excision repair-deficient and recombination-deficient mutants tested. The rescuing effect seen in PRR mutants heterozygous for mating type is likely the result of channeling lesions into a recombination repair pathway and away from the non-operational PRR pathway. Both checkpoint and mating type genes play a role in regulating PRR. Almost certainly these genes are required to monitor the cell cycle stage and DNA content to determine the best mechanism to repair the damaged DNA thus preventing genomic instability.</p>
9

Strengthening of concrete beams with composite plastic plates

An, Wei, 1963- January 1990 (has links)
This study investigates the feasibility of strengthening reinforced concrete beams with epoxy-bonded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced-Plastic (GFRP) plates. The composite plate is epoxy-bonded to the tension flange of the beam to increase its stiffness and strength. Seven rectangular and one T-beam, retrofitted with composite plates, were tested to failure under symmetrical 4-point bending. The load versus deflection and the load versus strain in the composite plate, steel rebar and the extreme compression fiber of concrete were measured and plotted for the midspan section throughout the entire range of loading up to failure. Analytical models based on the equilibrium of forces and compatibility of deformations were developed to predict the stresses and deformations of the beam in the linear and nonlinear regions. The predicted and measured results correlated well. The analytical models were used in a parametric study to investigate the effects of design variables such as, plate area, plate strength and stiffness, reinforcement ratio, etc., on the moment-curvature relationships of typical rectangular and T cross sections.
10

Concrete repair with realkalisation and the management thereof

Tshibangu, W. A. Muzemba. 15 August 2012 (has links)
M.Ing. / Maintaining and repairing building stock, repair and replacement of the infrastructure, has been a facet of the European building industry for more than 50 years. Deterioration of structures to a level that renders them unusable is a more recent occurrence in South Africa. World-wide changes in the proportion of construction expenditure on new construction and repair and refurbishing of existing structures has occurred only the last two decades. Today, nearly 50 % of such expenditure is on repair and renovation in comparison to proportions of 30 % of previous years. Projections indicate that this trend will continue at least to the next coming century. 1171 Such a substantial proportion of construction expenditure must be expected to influence the market for repair materials, specialized techniques and services. Therefore, a good understanding of the all range of modern concrete repair materials, associated techniques and services as well as latest developments in concrete rehabilitation technology is a prerequisite for designers and users of concrete structures. The following pages attempt to present the basic background of modern concrete repair approaches with regard to the intended use of building structures. They will also deal with the management of a repair project with realkalisation as a remediation strategy. The present condition of the Rand Afrikaans University main campus buildings will serve as a case study model.

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