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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Risk culture in a south African government institution

Gutshwa, Bhekokwakhe Henry January 2016 (has links)
Risk culture is defined as norms of behaviour for individuals and groups that determine the collective ability to identify and understand, openly discuss and act on an organisation’s current and future possible risks. Although studies have been done on risk culture, an assessment of the maturity level of risk culture in a South African government organisation has not been reported in the academic literature. Many government organisations have implemented risk management processes but it seems that, subsequently, no tangible benefits have been realised from applying these processes. The reason for this might be that these organisations did not first embed a risk culture. This article assesses the risk culture maturity level of a South African government organisation. Data were gathered by developing and applying a questionnaire and a checklist. In addition, documents were analysed. The results show that the organisation has established basic risk management processes and structures; however, a mature risk culture was not embedded in the organisational processes.
2

An evaluation of the risk culture at management level in a South African government organisation

Naidoo, Gonaseelan Soobramoney January 2015 (has links)
A strong risk culture is critical for any organisation to manage its risks. Recent reports from the Auditor-General about a South African government institution (Auditor General of South Africa, 2014) demonstrated that its risks were not being adequately mitigated. The purpose of the study reported on here has therefore been to put this judgement to the test and, because no recognised instrument could be found to evaluate the risk culture, an instrument was developed. Many of the risk culture assessment frameworks available have been developed by consulting companies which could be of value to organisations however this study chose to focus mainly on academic literature. In this descriptive study we used a focus group to identify the possible strengths and weaknesses of the prevailing risk culture, following which a questionnaire was designed and used to assess the current risk culture of the organisation. The results were used to evaluate the risk culture with the aim of proposing steps in which to embed a risk culture. We found that the existing risk culture does not contribute to this organisation’s capacity to manage its risks. We also found that managers in this organisation are not encouraged to take risks to achieve their objectives and employees are not held accountable for the management of risks. In agreement with previous studies which found that training in risk management is important, this study suggests that training should be compulsory for all senior management. This study also found that factors of tone at the top, accountability, communication, risk competence and risk capacity are critical to embed a risk culture in an organisation. This study contributes to the existing literature by suggesting ways in which a risk culture could be embedded in an organisation. The results of this research could be useful to organisations, boards, and risk committees.
3

Risk culture in a south African government institution

Gutshwa, Bhekokwakhe Henry January 2016 (has links)
Risk culture is defined as norms of behaviour for individuals and groups that determine the collective ability to identify and understand, openly discuss and act on an organisation’s current and future possible risks. Although studies have been done on risk culture, an assessment of the maturity level of risk culture in a South African government organisation has not been reported in the academic literature. Many government organisations have implemented risk management processes but it seems that, subsequently, no tangible benefits have been realised from applying these processes. The reason for this might be that these organisations did not first embed a risk culture. This article assesses the risk culture maturity level of a South African government organisation. Data were gathered by developing and applying a questionnaire and a checklist. In addition, documents were analysed. The results show that the organisation has established basic risk management processes and structures; however, a mature risk culture was not embedded in the organisational processes.
4

An evaluation of the risk culture at management level in a South African government organisation

Naidoo, Gonaseelan Soobramoney January 2015 (has links)
A strong risk culture is critical for any organisation to manage its risks. Recent reports from the Auditor-General about a South African government institution (Auditor General of South Africa, 2014) demonstrated that its risks were not being adequately mitigated. The purpose of the study reported on here has therefore been to put this judgement to the test and, because no recognised instrument could be found to evaluate the risk culture, an instrument was developed. Many of the risk culture assessment frameworks available have been developed by consulting companies which could be of value to organisations however this study chose to focus mainly on academic literature. In this descriptive study we used a focus group to identify the possible strengths and weaknesses of the prevailing risk culture, following which a questionnaire was designed and used to assess the current risk culture of the organisation. The results were used to evaluate the risk culture with the aim of proposing steps in which to embed a risk culture. We found that the existing risk culture does not contribute to this organisation’s capacity to manage its risks. We also found that managers in this organisation are not encouraged to take risks to achieve their objectives and employees are not held accountable for the management of risks. In agreement with previous studies which found that training in risk management is important, this study suggests that training should be compulsory for all senior management. This study also found that factors of tone at the top, accountability, communication, risk competence and risk capacity are critical to embed a risk culture in an organisation. This study contributes to the existing literature by suggesting ways in which a risk culture could be embedded in an organisation. The results of this research could be useful to organisations, boards, and risk committees.
5

Risk Cultures, Beef Traceability, and Food Safety in the United States and Zambia

Mukuni, Fidelia 15 June 2021 (has links)
Understanding ways of improving the safety of food is an important area of research. In this project, I explore the history of the food safety systems in the United States and the Republic of Zambia. Focusing on the traceability of meat (as a form of risk management), I reveal the factors shaping each of these systems, with an eye towards their similarities and differences. I argue that food safety systems come to look different due to how these regulatory systems differently define risk, some of which traceability has brought to light. In both countries, what influences risk cultures is trust in institutions, political leaders and in science and technology. For the Zambian public, trust is in local political leaders, in individuals and in brands. For the US public, trust is in information and knowledge of producers, which is found on labels. While the Zambian public generally trusts institutions, the US public, due to its history of institutional failures, does not. / Master of Science / Tracing where food comes from can be an important aspect of our food system. In this project, I show why food safety systems in the United States and Zambia look the way they that they do today. I do this by specifically focusing on how the two nations trace beef throughout the food supply chain. I show the different factors that have led to the food systems to look the way they do. My argument is that in the US and Zambia, there are non-scientific reasons why these food systems to look the way that they do today and why these countries address risk differently.
6

When seafood feeds the spirit yet poisons the body : developing health indicators for risk assessment in a Native American fishing community

Donatuto, Jamie 11 1900 (has links)
Current US government risk assessment and management regulations and policies are based on a position that views risk as an objective measure of a predictable physiological morbidity or mortality outcome that is not otherwise connected to social or cultural beliefs and values. Whereas human health risk assessments are meant to determine the probability of adverse impacts from particular hazards, the conventional risk assessment framework fails to consider Native American definitions of health and so risk. This study was conducted with the Coast Salish Swinomish Indian Tribal Community of Washington State, where contamination of their aquatic natural resources has been found. By conducting two series of interviews with traditional high-use seafood consumers, experts and elders from the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and by averting use of what I describe herein as ‘conventional’ fish consumption survey, the study allowed interviewees to provide a more complex narrative set of details and information that bestowed a much more accurate picture of the reasoning behind seafood consumption habits within the community. Among the more salient points that emerged from the interviews was that seafood represents a symbolic, deeply meaningful food source that is linked to a multi-dimensional ‘Swinomish’ concept of health. Yet drastic changes in access, harvest and consumption have occurred over time, and continue to this day. A health evaluation tool was also devised using simple descriptive scaled rankings to elucidate non-physiological health risks and impacts in relation to contaminated seafood. Findings demonstrate that community cohesion, food security, ceremonial use and knowledge transmission all play primary roles as concerns the Swinomish notions of health, and that these indicators are regarded as equally important when juxtaposed to physical indicators of health. Thus, to eat less seafood—as prescribed by current policy and decision-making procedures when contamination is present—is actually detrimental to the multi-dimensional concept of health as defined by the Swinomish. The evaluation tool may be used in conjunction with the conventional risk assessment framework to more accurately and comprehensively deduce risks and impacts.
7

When seafood feeds the spirit yet poisons the body : developing health indicators for risk assessment in a Native American fishing community

Donatuto, Jamie 11 1900 (has links)
Current US government risk assessment and management regulations and policies are based on a position that views risk as an objective measure of a predictable physiological morbidity or mortality outcome that is not otherwise connected to social or cultural beliefs and values. Whereas human health risk assessments are meant to determine the probability of adverse impacts from particular hazards, the conventional risk assessment framework fails to consider Native American definitions of health and so risk. This study was conducted with the Coast Salish Swinomish Indian Tribal Community of Washington State, where contamination of their aquatic natural resources has been found. By conducting two series of interviews with traditional high-use seafood consumers, experts and elders from the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and by averting use of what I describe herein as ‘conventional’ fish consumption survey, the study allowed interviewees to provide a more complex narrative set of details and information that bestowed a much more accurate picture of the reasoning behind seafood consumption habits within the community. Among the more salient points that emerged from the interviews was that seafood represents a symbolic, deeply meaningful food source that is linked to a multi-dimensional ‘Swinomish’ concept of health. Yet drastic changes in access, harvest and consumption have occurred over time, and continue to this day. A health evaluation tool was also devised using simple descriptive scaled rankings to elucidate non-physiological health risks and impacts in relation to contaminated seafood. Findings demonstrate that community cohesion, food security, ceremonial use and knowledge transmission all play primary roles as concerns the Swinomish notions of health, and that these indicators are regarded as equally important when juxtaposed to physical indicators of health. Thus, to eat less seafood—as prescribed by current policy and decision-making procedures when contamination is present—is actually detrimental to the multi-dimensional concept of health as defined by the Swinomish. The evaluation tool may be used in conjunction with the conventional risk assessment framework to more accurately and comprehensively deduce risks and impacts.
8

When seafood feeds the spirit yet poisons the body : developing health indicators for risk assessment in a Native American fishing community

Donatuto, Jamie 11 1900 (has links)
Current US government risk assessment and management regulations and policies are based on a position that views risk as an objective measure of a predictable physiological morbidity or mortality outcome that is not otherwise connected to social or cultural beliefs and values. Whereas human health risk assessments are meant to determine the probability of adverse impacts from particular hazards, the conventional risk assessment framework fails to consider Native American definitions of health and so risk. This study was conducted with the Coast Salish Swinomish Indian Tribal Community of Washington State, where contamination of their aquatic natural resources has been found. By conducting two series of interviews with traditional high-use seafood consumers, experts and elders from the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and by averting use of what I describe herein as ‘conventional’ fish consumption survey, the study allowed interviewees to provide a more complex narrative set of details and information that bestowed a much more accurate picture of the reasoning behind seafood consumption habits within the community. Among the more salient points that emerged from the interviews was that seafood represents a symbolic, deeply meaningful food source that is linked to a multi-dimensional ‘Swinomish’ concept of health. Yet drastic changes in access, harvest and consumption have occurred over time, and continue to this day. A health evaluation tool was also devised using simple descriptive scaled rankings to elucidate non-physiological health risks and impacts in relation to contaminated seafood. Findings demonstrate that community cohesion, food security, ceremonial use and knowledge transmission all play primary roles as concerns the Swinomish notions of health, and that these indicators are regarded as equally important when juxtaposed to physical indicators of health. Thus, to eat less seafood—as prescribed by current policy and decision-making procedures when contamination is present—is actually detrimental to the multi-dimensional concept of health as defined by the Swinomish. The evaluation tool may be used in conjunction with the conventional risk assessment framework to more accurately and comprehensively deduce risks and impacts. / Science, Faculty of / Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES), Institute for / Graduate
9

Enterprise risk management : developing a strategic ERM alignment framework, finance sector

Keith, Joanna Lucyna January 2014 (has links)
This thesis investigates the evolutionary process of risk management practices associated with the implementation of enterprise risk management (ERM) across the finance sector. Despite the increasing number of ERM adoptions in the finance industry in recent years, ERM was still at an early stage of development and further research is recommended. The literature review identifies a gap in the ERM literature, prompting the development of a theoretical framework to investigate key organisational factors critical to effective implementation of the strategic framework. A strategic ERM Alignment Framework was developed to address key shortcomings of existing ERM practices in the industry and to provide practical guidance to academics and practitioners. The research was conducted as a two-stage empirical study in the finance sector, employing sequential mixed methods of data collection and analysis: a series of 35 semi-structured qualitative interviews with senior enterprise risk managers representing a variety of financial organisations, followed by a quantitative questionnaire survey of 115 finance industry professionals. The literature supports the industry view of continuous internal and external pressures towards ERM implementation across financial organisations. The research findings confirm that ERM is perceived to have slowly transformed from a process of compliance to a strategic tool and become a source of value creation and competitive advantage. The study also shows that aligning ERM with core organisational strategies and enterprise risk culture have been the underlying factors driving a strategic ERM framework sustainable over time. Inadequate senior management support for ERM and an insufficiently dynamic enterprise risk culture are identified as the greatest challenges to ERM sustainability. Major benefits of ERM are revealed as well informed risk-adjusted decision making and a strategic enterprise-wide view of key risks. The main contribution to knowledge of this research is the development of a strategic ERM Alignment Framework for the finance sector and practical guidelines for its effective implementation. Specifically, this research offers academics and finance industry practitioners a better understanding of organisational factors critical to the implementation of a strategic ERM Alignment Framework, supported by empirical evidence. Key limitation of the research was identified as the complexity of the ERM Alignment Framework that can be mitigated by undertaking future research to simplify the framework following its practical application. The researcher recommends that future research should focus on intangible elements and qualities of ERM that are important to the Alignment Framework, such as developing a strong and consistent enterprise risk culture, or investigating how the framework can add value to the organisation.
10

Opening the black box : what makes risk management pervasive in organisations?

Mauelshagen, Craig William January 2012 (has links)
This thesis is concerned with what pervasive risk management is, and how it can be achieved in practice. Specifically, it examines the effect of social processes and cultural factors on how risk management can be coordinated across and embedded within business processes and organisational culture. A growing literature addresses what is termed risk management maturity: the capability of an organisation to assess, manage, communicate and govern risk (and opportunity). Notwithstanding its benefits, the emphasis of this literature on risk management benchmarking and standardisation has led, arguably, to a bureaucratisation of risk management process. Research followed a case study strategy and data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. A total of 43 interviews were conducted in one private and one public sector organisation. The findings describe a number of social processes and related cultural factors that significantly affected risk management pervasiveness in the two organisations. (1) Shared experience and respect for experience facilitated flexible coordination between operational and strategic risk management. (2) Informal, lateral communication integrated the knowledge of diverse stakeholders required to manage complex environmental risks. (3) Lack of common understanding of the purpose and function of risk management undermined coordination of risk management practice. These findings progress the debate on the balance between standardisation and informal social process to achieve pervasive risk management, and contribute to a richer description of organisational risk management maturity. The findings are of value to risk managers wishing to embed the adaptive and coordinated risk management required in dynamic and complex environments

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