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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A language behavior therapy program for couples seeking a better sexual adjustment

Terpstra, Margery Williams January 1972 (has links)
Typescript. / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1972. / Bibliography: leaves 151-157. / viii, 157 l illus., tables
2

Intimacy, orgasm likelihood of both partners, conflict, and partner response predict sexual satisfaction in heterosexual male and female respondents

Haning, R. Vernon. January 2005 (has links)
Theses (M.A.)--Marshall University, 2005. / Title from document title page. Includes abstract. Document formatted into pages: contains vi, 53 p. Bibliography: p. 50-53.
3

The effect of clients' sexual problems and emotional-security needs on counselors' perceptions of them, as to their emotional and job-skills handicaps

Livneh, Hanoch, January 1973 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1973. / Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
4

Who Saves the Animated World?: the Sex-Role Stereotyping of Superheroes and Superheroines in Children's Animated Programs

Unknown Date (has links)
This study investigates the stereotypic ways in which superheroes and superheroines are portrayed in children's animated programs. Previous studies have concluded that both animated males and females are presented in traditional sex-role stereotypic ways. Therefore, it was expected that heroic characters would be portrayed similarly. Of the 61 programs recorded, 24 contained heroic characters resulting in 46 superheroes and 24 superheroines. Each character was evaluated on physical appearance, personality traits, physical behaviors, and communicative behaviors. T-tests indicated significant differences between males and females, with superheroines portrayed as more attractive, emotional, superficial, inquisitive, easily excited, and worried about appearance compared to their male counterparts. Superheroes were presented as muscular, tough, angry, and more likely to threaten others compared to females. The potential implications of presenting characters in sex-role stereotypic ways are explored. / A Thesis submitted to the Department of Communication in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. / Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2004. / Date of Defense: March 24, 2004. / Gender Roles, Cartoons, Stereotyping / Includes bibliographical references. / Arthur A. Raney, Professor Directing Thesis; Laura M. Arpan, Committee Member; Donnalyn Pompper, Committee Member.
5

Causal attributions, self-monitoring, and gender differences among four virginity status groups

Schechterman, Andrew L. January 1987 (has links)
The purpose of this research was to determine whether or not different virginity status groups make different causal attributions about virginity and sexual choices, to determine whether self-monitoring influences this attribution process, and to determine whether or not there were any group sex differences.This research attempted to answer several questions: 1) What virginity status groups are most likely to be high self-monitors? Low self-monitors? Are there any sex differences? 2) What kinds of causal attributions do the different virginity status groups make about other virginity status groups? Are there any sex differences?The present research used Russell's Causal Dimension Scale (CDS) and Snyder's selfmonitoring scale to assess information about causal attributions and individual self-monitoring styles. One-hundred and ninety-eight subjects participated. Descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted to determine whether self-monitoring and virginitystatus were statistically related. Based on these correlation results, multivariate analyses were conducted. Wilke's Lambda coefficients were computed via a four-way factorial MANOVA analysis. Univariate analyses and F-tests were also computed based on the multivariate results. Post-hoc comparisons of significant univariate means (main effects and interactions) were then calculated using the Tukey B test.Results indicated that 1) self-monitoring and virginity status were not correlated although male subjects were significantly higher in self-monitoring than were female subjects. 2) Although univariate analyses revealed significant effects for attributions of internality and stability, using the conservative Tukey B procedure, there were no significant differences. 3) Adamant virgin subjects attributed significantly more internality to vignettes of males than Potential Non-virgin subjects did to vignettes of males. 4) Subjects attributed significantly more controllability to vignettes of female Regretful Non-virgins than to vignettes of female Adamant virgins. 5) Regretful Non-virgin subjects attributed significantly more stability to vignettes of Regretful Non-virgins than to vignettes of Adamant virgins. 6) Male subjects attributed significantly more controllability to vignettes of Potential Non-virgins than to vignettes of Adamant virgins. 7) Regretful Non-virgin subjects attributed significantly controllability to vignettes of male Potential Non-virgins than they did to vignettes of female Adamant virgins. 8) Non-virgin subjects attributed significantly more stability to vignettes of female Potential Non-virgins than they did to vignettes of female Regretful Non-virgins.A discussion of the results, their implications for practice, and recommendations for further research were also presented.
6

The role of species typical cues in sexual conditioning : analysis of potential adaptive specializations in learning

Cusato, Brian Michael, 1968- 09 March 2011 (has links)
Not available / text
7

Toward a dialogical view of sexuality and subjectivity in psychoanalysis

McCarroll, Jennifer Colleene 28 March 2011 (has links)
Not available / text
8

Implicit consent and rape : an integration theory analysis of female responses in a dating context

Vogelmann-Sine, Silke January 1980 (has links)
Typescript (photocopy) / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1980. / Bibliography: leaves 283-289. / Microfiche. / Master negative: Microfiche MS36114. / xvi, 289 leaves, bound ill. 29 cm
9

The use and acceptance of sexually aggressive tactics in college men /

Warkentin, Jennifer B. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Ohio University, August, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 83-93).
10

Determinants of sex-role identifications of homosexual female delinquents

Howard, Stephen James, January 1962 (has links)
Thesis--University of Southern California. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.

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