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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The health status and lifestyle behaviours of higher education students in Libya

Khalil, Khalid January 2011 (has links)
Aims. This research investigated the health status (e. g. weight perception and BMI, mental health conditions and general health complaints), and the lifestyle behaviours (e. g. smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary behaviour) of Libyan higher education students (HES). The objectives were to compare their health status and lifestyle behaviours in the different regions of Libya; and to compare Libyan HES with those from other countries. In addition to this, the study aimed to determine if any association existed between demographic and academic variables and health and lifestyle variables. Purpose. The purpose of the study was to provide baseline data required by university health programmes in Libya for planning related to the health needs of students. Methods. The sample consisted of 1300 higher education students from different higher education institutes and different disciplines. The self-administered health questionnaire used included questions on health and health-related behaviours and their associated social and economic factors. It was conducted during lecture time. Data were analysed with SPSS. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify sociodemographic variables associated with health and lifestyle variables. Results. In this sample of students, the prevalence of overweight was higher than the prevalence of underweight and obesity (14.5%, 18.2%, and 4.2% respectively), and 40% of students were trying to lose weight. High rates (45%) of depressive symptoms were found, however; overall 8.8% of respondents reported being diagnosed with anxiety, and 4.3% with depression. The findings of this study also indicated that students reported high levels of subjective health complaints. The majority of students reported that their physical activity levels were insufficient; only 5% of students met the international recommended levels of physical activity. Only one in ten students was found to be consuming an adequate amount of fruit and vegetables (at least five times a day). About 6% of the students self-identified themselves as current smokers, and the results revealed that smoking was a male phenomenon in Libya. Alcohol consumption is not very common among Libyan students, and only 3.5% reported drinking alcohol; overall, 1.6% reported using drugs, and all students who reported using drugs reported cannabis use. A gender difference was noticeable and consistent across types of complaints; depressive symptoms, dietary behaviour, physical activity, smoking and alcohol and drug consumption. Females reported significantly worse health status than males in terms of health complaints, and depressive symptoms. Males reported higher levels of physical activity and higher levels of smoking and alcohol and drug consumption than females. Students in North Libya showed the highest levels of physical activity, and also the highest levels of smoking, alcohol and drug consumption, whereas students in East Libya had the highest levels of fruit and vegetable consumption. Logistic regression analysis revealed substantial associations between females and depressive symptoms, dietary behaviour and higher levels of complaints, and also between social support and anxiety and depression. The comparisons with other survey data showed that the Libyan rates of overweight and obesity were similar to rates reported amongst students at Alexandria University in Egypt, and much higher than those reported in other countries such as Poland, Japan and Korea. Depressive symptom rates were similar to the rates reported among university students in Bulgaria and higher than those reported in Germany, Denmark and Poland with respect to male students, and Libyan HES reported lower rates of health complaints than students in certain other European countries. In addition, the levels of fruit and vegetable consumption amongst Libyan HES were lower than those reported amongst Australian students. The prevalence of physical activity levels was lower than that reported amongst university students in the United Arab Emirates. The results of this study clearly indicate that the prevalence of smoking and alcohol and drug consumption among students in Libya was " lower than among those from other Arabic countries such as the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. Conclusion. Efforts to promote a healthy lifestyle among students are needed and should place greater emphasis on physical activity and increased fruit and vegetable consumption, and on discouraging smoking and body dissatisfaction. There is a need for future research on student health, which should be carried out with a larger sample group to develop a national standardized instrument. Future research will be helpful for accurately identifying perceived barriers to, and recommending changes to enhance, physical activity among HES.
12

Understanding the drivers of change in sexual and reproductive health policy and legislation in Kenya

Oronje, Rose Ndakala January 2013 (has links)
The thesis explored the drivers and inhibitors of change in sexual and reproductive health (SRH) policy and legislation in Kenya. The overall purpose was to contribute to the limited knowledge on national-level debates that shape how developing countries adapt the SRH agenda, which originated from international processes. The thesis explains how and why some SRH reforms have been realised in Kenya amid contention, while others have been blocked. Guided by a synthesis conceptual framework that emphasised the central role of discursive power in decision-making, the thesis adopted a qualitative case-study design enriched with various anthropological concepts. Three case-studies (two bureaucratic, i.e. adolescent RH policy and national RH policy, and one legislative, i.e. sexual offences law) were deconstructed. Data collection involved semi-structured in-depth interviews with policy actors, observations and note-taking in meetings, and document review. Findings revealed that four influential narratives of SRH – the moral narrative, cultural narrative, medical narrative (with two variations i.e. ‘moralised' versus ‘comprehensive' medical narratives), and human rights narrative – underpinned by conflicting actor interests, mediated the interplay of actor networks, knowledge, context and institutions to determine reforms. The findings revealed that the strong entrenchment of the moral and cultural narratives in the Kenyan context (mainly public structures and institutions) was a major barrier to reforms on contested SRH issues. Even then, the hegemonic narratives were in some cases unsettled to make reforms possible. The most important factors in unsettling the hegemonic narratives to facilitate reforms included: a change in the political context that brought in new political actors supportive of reforms, the presence of knowledgeable and charismatic issue champions within political and bureaucratic institutions, the availability of compelling knowledge (scientific or lay) on an issue, sustained evidence-informed advocacy by civil society/non-governmental organisations, donor pressure, and reduced political costs (for politicians and bureaucrats) for supporting reforms. The main contribution of the thesis is three-fold. First, the thesis captures the disconnect between international SRH agreements and national-level realities, showing the need for international actors to consider national-level realities that shape decision-making. Second, its findings provide lessons for informing future SRH reform efforts in Kenya and in other sub-Saharan African countries. Third, its analysis of discursive power contributes to a major theoretical gap in health systems research in developing countries identified as lack of critical analysis of power in decision-making.
13

Deconstructing the “Low Other” in the First Wave of Sex Hygiene Films (1914-1919)

Cârstian, Maria January 2019 (has links)
The present thesis investigates the commercial sex hygiene films produced between the years 1914 and 1919 in the United States, during the last years of the Progressive Era. Rejected and prohibited as soon as five years after their apparition, the sex hygiene films’ position within the industry, as well as the cinematic techniques they incorporated, will be analysed through the concept of the Low Other. The first part of the thesis aims to delineate the used concepts, as well as integrate the sex hygiene film into a wider cultural, social, and political framework. The second part explores the films’ aesthetic construction, then focuses on a textual analysis of the narrative and non-narrative methods implied by three particular sex hygiene films. Finally, the thesis concludes that the films used a series of cinematic methods to create a Low Other on-screen, yet these very methods ultimately played a part within their suppression as a Low Other body of culture.

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