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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

What do we know about adolescent risky sexual behavior : a multi-level environmental approach /

Chen, Angela Chia-Chen. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2004. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 120-127).
2

Motivations for safe sex: How Fundamental Social Motives influence safe sex behaviors

January 2020 (has links)
archives@tulane.edu / While sexual behavior is both a biological imperative and fundamental aspect of close relationships, engaging in it can lead to the development of negative health consequences. Three studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between social motivations, perceived susceptibility to infection and disease, disgust sensitivity, and various measures about condom use. Study 1 (N = 198) was utilized as an exploratory study to get a preliminary look at which motivations significantly predicted condom use behaviors and intentions. Based on the results of Study 1, for Study 2 (N = 328), affiliation, mate seeking, mate retention, and kin care motives were predicted to have the most robust effect on increased condom use and intentions. Results found affiliation to predict positive increases in condom use, perceived subjective norms, and intent, mate seeking to predict positive increases in condom use, and kin care to predict positive increases in intent to use condoms. No effects were found for mate retention. For Study 3 (N = 413), affiliation, mate seeking, and kin care were predicted to have the most robust effect on the condom use measures. Affiliation emerged as the strongest predictor; all three subscales of affiliation significantly predict changes in condom use behaviors, intentions, and perceived behavioral control. Contrary to the original prediction, affiliation independence did not predict the relationship in the expected direction. Dispositional variation in worry about disease did not predict any differences in condom use, which calls into question whether it plays a role in shaping sexual behavior. Limitations of the current studies and future directions for research regarding motivations on sexual behavior are considered. / 1 / Kyra R. Ness-Lanckriet
3

The experience of having become sexually active for adolescent mothers /

Burns, Vicki E. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri--Columbia, 2003. / "May 2003." Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 285-308).
4

Sexual plasticity in a marine goby (Lythrypnus dalli) social, endocrine, and genetic influences on functional sex /

Rodgers, Edmund W. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Georgia State University, 2007. / Title from file title page. Mattew S Grober, committee chair; Kim Wallen, Charles Derby, Laura Carruth, Tim Bartness, committee members. Electronic text (107 p. : ill. (some col.)) : digital, PDF file. Description based on contents viewed Jan. 31, 2008. Includes bibliographical references. (p. 94-107)
5

The vocal behaviour of the Spring Peeper, Hyla crucifer/

Rosen, Michael. January 1974 (has links)
No description available.
6

Staying respectable : managing the moral repercussions of teenage sex and pregnancy

Briedis, Catherine M. January 1974 (has links)
No description available.
7

Reproductive behaviour in the male rat: importance of 5-HT2 receptor activity and relation to 5-HT2-dependent serotonergic stereotypy

Watson, Neil Verne 05 1900 (has links)
It is well established that the neurotransmitter serotonin participates in the control of sexual behaviour in the male rat. Recently, it has been found that serotonergic activity may either inhibit or facilitate sexual behaviour, depending on the subtypes of serotonin receptors involved. However, the participation of 5-HT2 receptors in the control of male rat copulation has received little experimental attention, and the published data are equivocal. In Experiments 1-4, it was established that the 5- HT2/1C agonist DCI inhibits sexual behaviour in male rats; this inhibition is effectively reversed by the antagonists ritanserin, pirenperone, and ketanserin. Comparison of these effects , with reference to the binding profiles of each drug, provided strong evidence that 5-HT2/1C receptors mediate an inhibitory influence on sexual behaviour in male rats. In addition, a tentative claim may be made that the effects of these drugs may be more attributable to 5-HT2 activity than 5-UT1C activity. ‘Wet dog shake’ behaviour in rats is known to be 5-HT2- dependent. Experiments 5—7 evaluated the novel proposition that the incidence of spontaneous wet dog shaking (WDS) by male rats in mating tests may provide a behavioural assay of concurrent 5—HT2 activity. WDS was found to be associated with copulatory inhibition in noncopulating males, compared to normal copulators, and this relationship was specific to mating situations. Activating 5-HT2/1C receptors with DOl simultaneously induced WDS and inhibited copulation. Thus, the incidence of spontaneous WDS in untreated males may reflect the function of a 5—HT2—mediated neural mechanism that tonically inhibits copulation in male rats. In Experiment 8, DOl microinjection in the nucleus raphe obscurus/inferior olivary complex also induced WDS and inhibited copulation. This suggests that the hypothesized 5- flT2-dependent inhibitory mechanism is vested in the ventromedial brainstem. Recent anatomical findings support this suggestion: cells in this region have bifurcating axons, projecting collaterally to both the medial preoptic area (implicated in sexual behaviour) and to the ventral cervical spinal cord (implicated in WDS). Overall, the results of the eight experiments provide strong evidence that 5-HT2 receptors mediate some of the inhibitory effects of serotonin on male rat sexual behaviour.
8

Young adolescents' intention to engage in pre-sexual activities: an exploratory study

Walker, Lisa Margot 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
9

Effects of Early Isolation on the Experiential, Hormonal and Neural Regulation of Sexual Behavior in Male Long-Evans Rats

Akbari, Emis 01 March 2010 (has links)
Reproductive success in the male rat depends on the ability to recognize appropriate sexual cues, motivation to respond to those cues, and coordination of the necessary motor sequences required to optimize sexual performance and an ejaculatory response. Early maternal environment is important in the normal development of copulatory behavior. Manipulation of this early social stimulation results in alterations in male sexual behavior and in the functioning of mediating endocrine and neurotransmitter systems. The present series of studies were designed to explore the effects of early life maternal deprivation and replacement maternal licking-like stimulation on the development of male rat sexual behavior and the neurophysiological mechanisms which mediate sexual performance with specific attention to the dopamine (DA) and androgen systems. Long-Evans male rats were reared with or without their mothers through the use of the artificial rearing (AR) paradigm. Half of the AR rats were provided with licking-like stimulation, consisting of periodic stroking with a paintbrush. In study 1, AR and maternally-reared (MR) rats were tested in adulthood for sexual behavior. Neuronal activation in response to copulation was assessed using an antibody against the protein product of the immediate early gene c-fos in brain regions that sub-serve sexual behavior. Study 2 explored whether sexual behavioral deficits observed in AR males can be reversed by later sexual experience. In this study, animals were sacrificed following a ninth copulatory trial and Fos immunoreactivity, androgen and estrogen-α receptors were assessed. In study 3, the effects of early maternal deprivation on partner preference in both males that are differentially reared, and, female preference towards these males were investigated. This explored if any behavioral deficits observed in AR males could be attributed to differences in their attractivity to females. Study 4 investigated the effects of early maternal deprivation on androgen sensitivity in adult males. Copulatory response to a receptive female was examined post-castration in AR and MR males and again following testosterone replacement. In study 5, levels of extracellular DA were investigated in the nucleus accumbens, an area critical in motivation, prior to and during copulation in sexually experienced AR and MR males using Microdialysis.
10

Effects of Early Isolation on the Experiential, Hormonal and Neural Regulation of Sexual Behavior in Male Long-Evans Rats

Akbari, Emis 01 March 2010 (has links)
Reproductive success in the male rat depends on the ability to recognize appropriate sexual cues, motivation to respond to those cues, and coordination of the necessary motor sequences required to optimize sexual performance and an ejaculatory response. Early maternal environment is important in the normal development of copulatory behavior. Manipulation of this early social stimulation results in alterations in male sexual behavior and in the functioning of mediating endocrine and neurotransmitter systems. The present series of studies were designed to explore the effects of early life maternal deprivation and replacement maternal licking-like stimulation on the development of male rat sexual behavior and the neurophysiological mechanisms which mediate sexual performance with specific attention to the dopamine (DA) and androgen systems. Long-Evans male rats were reared with or without their mothers through the use of the artificial rearing (AR) paradigm. Half of the AR rats were provided with licking-like stimulation, consisting of periodic stroking with a paintbrush. In study 1, AR and maternally-reared (MR) rats were tested in adulthood for sexual behavior. Neuronal activation in response to copulation was assessed using an antibody against the protein product of the immediate early gene c-fos in brain regions that sub-serve sexual behavior. Study 2 explored whether sexual behavioral deficits observed in AR males can be reversed by later sexual experience. In this study, animals were sacrificed following a ninth copulatory trial and Fos immunoreactivity, androgen and estrogen-α receptors were assessed. In study 3, the effects of early maternal deprivation on partner preference in both males that are differentially reared, and, female preference towards these males were investigated. This explored if any behavioral deficits observed in AR males could be attributed to differences in their attractivity to females. Study 4 investigated the effects of early maternal deprivation on androgen sensitivity in adult males. Copulatory response to a receptive female was examined post-castration in AR and MR males and again following testosterone replacement. In study 5, levels of extracellular DA were investigated in the nucleus accumbens, an area critical in motivation, prior to and during copulation in sexually experienced AR and MR males using Microdialysis.

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