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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Automatically Locating Sensor Position on an E-textile Garment Via Pattern Recognition

Love, Andrew R. 28 October 2009 (has links)
Electronic textiles are a sound platform for wearable computing. Many applications have been devised that use sensors placed on these textiles for fields such as medical monitoring and military use or for display purposes. Most of these applications require that the sensors have known locations for accurate results. Activity recognition is one application that is highly dependent on knowledge of the sensor position. Therefore, this thesis presents the design and implementation of a method whereby the location of the sensors on the electronic textile garments can be automatically identified when the user is performing an appropriate activity. The software design incorporates principle component analysis using singular value decomposition to identify the location of the sensors. This thesis presents a method to overcome the problem of bilateral symmetry through sensor connector design and sensor orientation detection. The scalability of the solution is maintained through the use of culling techniques. This thesis presents a flexible solution that allows for the fine-tuning of the accuracy of the results versus the number of valid queries, depending on the constraints of the application. The resulting algorithm is successfully tested on both motion capture and sensor data from an electronic textile garment. / Master of Science
2

Analysis of Spherical Harmonics and Singular Value Decomposition as Compression Tools in Image Processing.

Qamar, Aamir, Din, Islamud, Khan, Muhammad Abbas January 2012 (has links)
Spherical Harmonics (SPHARM) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) utilize the orthogonal relations of its parameters to represent and process images. The process involve mapping of the image from its original parameter domain to a new domain where the processing is performed. This process induces distortion and smoothing is required. The image now mapped to the new parameter domain is descripted using SPHARM and SVD using one at a time. The least significant values for the SPHARM coefficients and singular values of SVD are truncated which induces compression in the reconstructed image keeping the memory allocation in view. In this thesis, we have applied SPHARM and SVD tools to represent and reconstruct an image. The image is first mapped to the unit sphere (a sphere with unit radius). The image gets distorted that is maximum at the north and south poles, for which smoothing is approached by leaving 0.15*π space blank at each pole where no mapping is done. Sampling is performed for the θ and φ parameters and the image is represented using spherical harmonics and its coefficients are calculated. The same is then repeated for the SVD and singular values are computed. Reconstruction is performed using the calculated parameters, but defined over some finite domain, which is done by truncating the SPHARM coefficients and the singular values inducing image compression. Results are formulated for the various truncation choices and analyzed and finally it is concluded that SPHARM is better as compared with SVD as compression tool as there is not much difference in the quality of the reconstructed image with both tools, though SVD seem better quality wise, but with much higher memory allocation than SPHARM.
3

Singular Value Decomposition

Ek, Christoffer January 2012 (has links)
Digital information och kommunikation genom digitala medier är ett växande område. E-post och andra kommunikationsmedel används dagligen över hela världen. Parallellt med att området växer så växer även intresset av att hålla informationen säker. Transmission via antenner är inom signalbehandling ett välkänt område. Transmission från en sändare till en mottagare genom fri rymd är ett vanligt exempel. I en tuff miljö som till exempel ett rum med reflektioner och oberoende elektriska apparater kommer det att finnas en hel del distorsion i systemet och signalen som överförs kan, på grund av systemets egenskaper och buller förvrängas.Systemidentifiering är ett annat välkänt begrepp inom signalbehandling. Denna avhandling fokuserar på systemidentifiering i en tuff miljö med okända system. En presentation ges av matematiska verktyg från den linjära algebran samt en tillämpning inom signalbehandling. Denna avhandling grundar sig främst på en matrisfaktorisering känd som Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). SVD’n används här för att lösa komplicerade matrisinverser och identifiera system.Denna avhandling utförs i samarbete med Combitech AB. Deras expertis inom signalbehandling var till stor hjälp när teorin praktiserades. Med hjälp av ett välkänt programmeringsspråk känt som LabView praktiserades de matematiska verktygen och kunde synkroniseras med diverse instrument som användes för att generera signaler och system. / Digital information transmission is a growing field. Emails, videos and so on are transmitting around the world on a daily basis. Along the growth of using digital devises there is in some cases a great interest of keeping this information secure. In the field of signal processing a general concept is antenna transmission. Free space between an antenna transmitter and a receiver is an example of a system. In a rough environment such as a room with reflections and independent electrical devices there will be a lot of distortion in the system and the signal that is transmitted might, due to the system characteristics and noise be distorted. System identification is another well-known concept in signal processing. This thesis will focus on system identification in a rough environment and unknown systems. It will introduce mathematical tools from the field of linear algebra and applying them in signal processing. Mainly this thesis focus on a specific matrix factorization called Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). This is used to solve complicated inverses and identifying systems. This thesis is formed and accomplished in collaboration with Combitech AB. Their expertise in the field of signal processing was of great help when putting the algorithm in practice. Using a well-known programming script called LabView the mathematical tools were synchronized with the instruments that were used to generate the systems and signals.
4

SVD and PCA in Image Processing

Renkjumnong, Wasuta - 16 July 2007 (has links)
The Singular Value Decomposition is one of the most useful matrix factorizations in applied linear algebra, the Principal Component Analysis has been called one of the most valuable results of applied linear algebra. How and why principal component analysis is intimately related to the technique of singular value decomposition is shown. Their properties and applications are described. Assumptions behind this techniques as well as possible extensions to overcome these limitations are considered. This understanding leads to the real world applications, in particular, image processing of neurons. Noise reduction, and edge detection of neuron images are investigated.
5

On the Multiway Principal Component Analysis

Ouyang, Jialin January 2023 (has links)
Multiway data are becoming more and more common. While there are many approaches to extending principal component analysis (PCA) from usual data matrices to multiway arrays, their conceptual differences from the usual PCA, and the methodological implications of such differences remain largely unknown. This thesis aims to specifically address these questions. In particular, we clarify the subtle difference between PCA and singular value decomposition (SVD) for multiway data, and show that multiway principal components (PCs) can be estimated reliably in absence of the eigengaps required by the usual PCA, and in general much more efficiently than the usual PCs. Furthermore, the sample multiway PCs are asymptotically independent and hence allow for separate and more accurate inferences about the population PCs. The practical merits of multiway PCA are further demonstrated through numerical, both simulated and real data, examples.
6

COMBINING THE MATRIX TRANSFORM METHOD WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TO ESTIMATE THE INTERFACIAL HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT CORRESPONDING TO VARIOUS MOLD COATINGS

Weathers, Jeffrey Wayne 07 May 2005 (has links)
The interfacial heat transfer coefficient is an important variable regarding the subject of metal castings. The error associated with the experimental temperature data must be dealt with appropriately so that they do not significantly affect the resulting interfacial heat transfer coefficient. The systematic and random errors are addressed using a combination of three-dimensional finite element modeling and the matrix transform method, respectively. Experimentally obtained A356 permanent mold casting data was used to estimate the interfacial heat transfer coefficient corresponding to common industrial mold coatings.
7

Activity Recognition Processing in a Self-Contained Wearable System

Chong, Justin Brandon 05 November 2008 (has links)
Electronic textiles provide an effective platform to contain wearable computing elements, especially components geared towards the application of activity recognition. An activity recogni tion system built into a wearable textile substrate can be utilized in a variety of areas including health monitoring, military applications, entertainment, and fashion. Many of the activity recognition and motion capture systems previously developed have several drawbacks and limitations with regard to their respective designs and implementations. Some such systems are often times expensive, not conducive to mass production, and may be difficult to calibrate. An effective system must also be scalable and should be deployable in a variety of environments and contexts. This thesis presents the design and implementation of a self-contained motion sensing wearable electronic textile system with an emphasis toward the application of activity recognition. The system is developed with scalability and deployability in mind, and as such, utilizes a two-tier hierarchical model combined with a network infrastructure and wireless connectivity. An example prototype system, in the form of a jumpsuit garment, is presented and is constructed from relatively inexpensive components and materials. / Master of Science
8

OBJECT RECOGNITION BY GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR IMAGING SYSTEMS WITH TEMPORAL SPECTRAL STATISTICS

Ono, Sashi, Lee, Hua 10 1900 (has links)
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings / October 18-21, 2004 / Town & Country Resort, San Diego, California / This paper describes a new approach to object recognition by using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) imaging systems. The recognition procedure utilizes the spectral content instead of the object shape in traditional methods. To produce the identification feature of an object, the most common spectral component is obtained by singular value decomposition (SVD) of the training sets. The identification process is then integrated into the backward propagation image reconstruction algorithm, which is implemented on the FMCW GPR imaging systems.
9

Probabilistic Robust Design For Dynamic Systems Using Metamodelling

Seecharan, Turuna Saraswati January 2007 (has links)
Designers use simulations to observe the behaviour of a system and to make design decisions to improve dynamic performance. However, for complex dynamic systems, these simulations are often time-consuming and, for robust design purposes, numerous simulations are required as a range of design variables is investigated. Furthermore, the optimum set is desired to meet specifications at particular instances in time. In this thesis, the dynamic response of a system is broken into discrete time instances and recorded into a matrix. Each column of this matrix corresponds to a discrete time instance and each row corresponds to the response at a particular design variable set. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is then used to separate this matrix into two matrices: one that consists of information in parameter-space and the other containing information in time-space. Metamodels are then used to efficiently and accurately calculate the response at some arbitrary set of design variables at any time. This efficiency is especially useful in Monte Carlo simulation where the responses are required at a very large sample of design variable sets. This work is then extended where the normalized sensitivities along with the first and second moments of the response are required at specific times. Later, the procedure of calculating the metamodel at specific times and how this metamodel is used in parameter design or integrated design for finding the optimum parameters given specifications at specific time steps is shown. In conclusion, this research shows that SVD and metamodelling can be used to apply probabilistic robust design tools where specifications at certain times are required for the optimum performance of a system.
10

Probabilistic Robust Design For Dynamic Systems Using Metamodelling

Seecharan, Turuna Saraswati January 2007 (has links)
Designers use simulations to observe the behaviour of a system and to make design decisions to improve dynamic performance. However, for complex dynamic systems, these simulations are often time-consuming and, for robust design purposes, numerous simulations are required as a range of design variables is investigated. Furthermore, the optimum set is desired to meet specifications at particular instances in time. In this thesis, the dynamic response of a system is broken into discrete time instances and recorded into a matrix. Each column of this matrix corresponds to a discrete time instance and each row corresponds to the response at a particular design variable set. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is then used to separate this matrix into two matrices: one that consists of information in parameter-space and the other containing information in time-space. Metamodels are then used to efficiently and accurately calculate the response at some arbitrary set of design variables at any time. This efficiency is especially useful in Monte Carlo simulation where the responses are required at a very large sample of design variable sets. This work is then extended where the normalized sensitivities along with the first and second moments of the response are required at specific times. Later, the procedure of calculating the metamodel at specific times and how this metamodel is used in parameter design or integrated design for finding the optimum parameters given specifications at specific time steps is shown. In conclusion, this research shows that SVD and metamodelling can be used to apply probabilistic robust design tools where specifications at certain times are required for the optimum performance of a system.

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